Teach discipline and focus

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It is amazing that the school boards for both Richmond and Columbia counties are willing to furlough teachers and increase class sizes, but at no time do I recall any reduction of the administration.

When Columbia County built a new office for the school board, it went from a small complex of one level to a rather large building with three floors. Initially the third floor was not to be needed, but I am sure it is now in use. Before the time when Columbia County’s superintendent was appointed rather than elected, a much smaller staff was needed. Now it seems to call for more and more administrators and paperwork with less and less discipline in the schools.

I attended school when one principal and secretary ran the school ,with a teacher (in primary grades) who was with the class from roll call to dismissal at the end of the day. That staff was the judge and jury, and carried out any discipline as needed – no running to the school board about how mistreated the children were.

If the teachers are to educate, that education includes discipline – yet present-day students seem to think they are able to decide when and what work they do in school. I am impressed by the new “vocational” school that Richmond County is implementing. Having had the occasion to visit Harlem High School in the past, it also is impressive with its vocational aspect.

Since every student will not attend college, it is great to have an alternative education goal. My oldest daughter chose not to attend college out of high school, but went to Augusta Tech, worked for a couple of years, then attended college, which was an excellent choice. Many teenagers do not know what they want to do in life at 18 or 19 years old, so a couple of years of maturity can be very beneficial to their choice of vocation.

I am old enough that the prospect of being drafted into the military dictated my period of maturing. You either volunteered or were going to be drafted if you were physically fit, so no company was going to hire you and train you in any skilled position.

Jerry O. Knight

Evans

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Martinez
154
Points
Martinez 03/18/12 - 02:14 am
6
0
This problem is not specific

This problem is not specific to Richmond or Columbia County. The issue is NCLB. It's all about test scores and graduation rates now. Discipline is dictated by laws that prohibit schools from suspending a child for more then a certain number of days per year. High schools with low performance are lowering the bar for grades and graduation as to not lose funding for poor performance. How else are students with 40+ days absent passing? Lower levels are simply teaching to the test since that dictates their funding. Hence all the recent cheating scandals. Administrations are now in direct conflict with the needs of the classroom. They send discipline problems right back to the classroom and sometimes even discipline the teacher for "lack of classroom control". It's hard to have class control when your students know that absent breaking the law, the school isn't going to suspend them and the teacher has to let them back in class. I say suspend or kick out those who don't behave, fail those who don't earn the grades and put some responsibility back on the students and their parents. Until this happens, administrations will continue to grow as districts try to balance doing more with less while under strict legislation that requires that every child succeed.

desertcat6
1140
Points
desertcat6 03/18/12 - 04:49 am
4
0
As a former teacher, I can

As a former teacher, I can tell you teachers really can make a difference. Unfortunately, the way teachers are trained and educated doesn't give them the tools required to inspire students to learn and achieve academic excellence. Those qualities are either in the teacher or they aren't. Prinipals can either encourage or stifle those qualities. School boards can either reward or ignore teacher quality. For the latter, mediorce schools become the norm.

avidreader
2957
Points
avidreader 03/18/12 - 10:35 am
2
0
A few weeks ago, I attended a

A few weeks ago, I attended a day-long seminar and met a teacher from another school. This teacher commented that "public schools are more about domestication than education". This phrase has been constantly spinning around in my head. How does a student with 40+ absences pass? But many do! Why do we waste so much time attempting to domesticate miscreants who have no interest in critical thinking and exploring knowledge? We just do! We live in a society of entitlements, and this philosophy has spread into the public school system -- a "C" for marginal effort. If 95% of the Juniors in a H.S. do not show up for graduation tests, the school does not make AYP. One can assume that suspensions come to a roaring halt during the third week of March.

pearlthesquirrel
786
Points
pearlthesquirrel 03/18/12 - 11:29 am
4
0
Well, well, well, it's good
Unpublished

Well, well, well, it's good to see somebody "bringing the heat" to the education debate / debacle - well, other than me that is......and J.O.K. brought the heat. When "cuts" are made, why is it that they always "start at the bottom" instead of "starting at the top"? That's a good question - a question I've been asking for centuries that nobody can or wants to answer. In April 1983, there was a report that came out entitled A Nation At Risk - maybe you've read it. Within A Nation At Risk was a line that grabbed everyones attention and opened everyones eyes - and word for word it went like this: "If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war." Does that ring a bell? Remember, I said this was 1983 - almost 30 years ago. And guess what? We're still yakking and yammering about this countries educational deficiencies. You see, education is just like the weather - everybody talks about it but nobody does anything about it! Admit it -"We, the people" are fighting a losing battle - the "entitlement" and "politically correct" machinery have entrenched themselves into the institution of education and now that they've got a stranglehold on it......well, they're not going to let go.
I can't wait for the 100 thumbs up I'll get for my magnificent, bodacious, ostentatious, loquacious comments.
Oh yea, one more thing.....peace out!

AutumnLeaves
5976
Points
AutumnLeaves 03/18/12 - 02:35 pm
1
0
I have a question: when the

I have a question: when the writer of the article mentions discipline, is he talking about discipline or corporal punishment? It seems, at least in the paragraph that says: "..that staff was judge and jury, and carried out disciple as needed...." that the writer is using the word discipline when he means corporal punishment. Good teachers guide, teach and set an example for children, so that their students can eventually discipline themselves. The word discipline is not a synonym for the phrase corporal punishment. They are two entirely different things.

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 03/18/12 - 04:56 pm
4
0
AutumnLeaves, Your third

AutumnLeaves,

Your third sentence concludes with the words "eventually discipline themselves."

Hard-headed(and soft-behinded) kids frequently require corporal punishment administered by caring adults to help them rein in their anti-social impulses. Fortunately,my maternal grandmother cared more about my future than she did the future of the peach saplings in her backyard.

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 03/18/12 - 07:14 pm
1
0
Agreed with Craig. Lack of

Agreed with Craig. Lack of discipline in todays liberal world has served no purpose but to drive our youth backwards socially and helped deprive our youth of what's left of our educational system. Children and youth are steering this ship because we allow them to and apparently have no problem with it.

Bizkit
29143
Points
Bizkit 03/18/12 - 10:27 pm
1
0
Sadly many of these kids who

Sadly many of these kids who can barely read and write then go to college. Most had to take enhancement classes to try to prepare them, but now those funds have been cut. So we have a significant fraction of college students who really don't belong in college because they have yet mastered a high school education. Now many will survive but after a year or two of mediocre or bad grades their GPA is shot and they will end up with a useless education. If you take over five years and have less than a B average you've wasted your money studies indicate.

Bizkit
29143
Points
Bizkit 03/18/12 - 10:44 pm
0
0
We need to cut, cut, cut,

We need to cut, cut, cut, because we already spend more for less return than anywhere in the world. Third world countries educate their youth better and for less. Private schools debateably educate our youth as good or better for less. The system is warped liked the fatted cow. We need to lean it up and give it some muscle. Money isn't the problem.

SCV Sam
0
Points
SCV Sam 03/19/12 - 05:59 pm
0
1
Three possible solutions: 1.
Unpublished

Three possible solutions:
1. Bring back the "BOARD of education" -- corporal punishment is God's way, and most government school pupils could use a healthy taste of it.
2. End the social experiments that ruined the government schools via activist judges starting in the 1960s.
3. End the government schools all together. God's Word charges a father, not a Big Bother government with educating a child. Georgia had no government schools prior to The War anyway, but rather had them forced upon by outside Reconstructionist occupiers. Reclaim our Southern heritage with families and churches educating.

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