Sympathy misplaced over execution

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It was extremely disgusting to me when I read the June 25 Associated Press article about the Roy Blankenship execution.

Brian Kammer, the defense attorney, made the bleeding-heart statement about the needless suffering that this rapist-killer experienced. Kammer said it was unconscionable.

Dr. David Waisel, a Harvard medical professor, was also crying that "they clearly botched" this execution and that Mr. Blankenship clearly suffered.

Neither of these intellectuals even mentioned the victim, Sarah Mims Bowen. I wonder if her "head jerked and there was needless suffering." She was raped and had a heart attack in 1978.

This low-life was kept alive for 33 years! Can you imagine the cost to the taxpayers?

I truly feel this rapist-killer should have been killed in the same manner as his victim, and not take 33 years to do it. Our system needs to be more concerned about innocent victims. Their priorities are certainly misplaced.

I wonder if Brian Kammer and David Weisel would have felt differently had the victim been their wife, daughter or sister. I think not.

Reubin Loper

Augusta

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Fundamental_Arminian
1833
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Fundamental_Arminian 07/17/11 - 06:37 am
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Thirty-three years is an

Thirty-three years is an awful long time between this crime and its punishment. For the death penalty to have a deterring effect, we need to shorten the time. "Because sentence against an evil work is not executed speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set in them to do evil" (Ecclesiastes 8:11 KJV).

southernguy08
499
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southernguy08 07/17/11 - 07:27 am
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RETIRED, would it make you
Unpublished

RETIRED, would it make you feel better if the executioner was a liberal?

david jennings
590
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david jennings 07/17/11 - 07:59 am
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While I find no pleasure in

While I find no pleasure in the punishment I dont feel sympathy for any slight suffering.I do feel for the victim.I wouldnt want the job of executioner but I sure dont want my tax money used to support anyone who is sorry enough to do the crime,The man owed society and the victims family.I cant imagine living in a lawless state,its bad enough with laws.

rmwhitley
5547
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rmwhitley 07/17/11 - 10:30 am
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Mr. RetiredArmy, I'd be mored
Unpublished

Mr. RetiredArmy, I'd be mored than honored to offer my services to rid the planet of scum such as blankenship and to help kammer reflect upon his "civic" duty.

rmwhitley
5547
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rmwhitley 07/17/11 - 10:44 am
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Mr. RetiredArmy, I'd be mored
Unpublished

Mr. RetiredArmy, I'd be mored than honored to offer my services to rid the planet of scum such as blankenship and to help kammer reflect upon his "civic" duty.

TrukinRanger
1748
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TrukinRanger 07/17/11 - 10:45 am
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I guess you could say I'm a
Unpublished

I guess you could say I'm a liberal. I'd be happy to apply for the position of button pusher, IV injector, trigger puller, etc. I have a limit on my liberal views and sometimes you just have to stand up against evil people.

Swampman
46
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Swampman 07/17/11 - 11:31 am
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Nevermind that we have a

Nevermind that we have a constitutional prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment - and Mr. Roper's reactionary (if understandable) sense of anger and outrage is precisely the reason we have it. The founding fathers were well aware of capital punishment's monstrous excesses - immolation, breaking on the wheel, drawing and quartering, crucifixion, etc. - and were having none of that in the new republic.

I'm an unapologetic political moderate - meaning, I stand to the left of many of you - who supports capital punishment for the most heinous criminals. Rapists-murderers top my list of appropriate recipients. But we must never debase our justice system to a literal eye-for-an-eye level, no matter how justified our outrage.

That said, I really don't like lethal injection as a method of execution. Execution should not be a medical procedure and medical professionals should not be involved beyond certifying death. Lethal injection is a gross violation of medical ethics. What is the alternative? Firing squad. We already have armed officers of the court.

And, honestly, if we must show a rapist-murderer the compassion we extend to a beloved old dog, I simply cannot much care if he twitches as the drugs take effect.

One point upon which Mr. Roper and I agree: 33 years of delay is ridiculous.

mike1sc
217
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mike1sc 07/17/11 - 12:36 pm
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I spent over thirty years as

I spent over thirty years as an employee in the Federal Prison System, working over the years in pretty much all the different security level facilities. We like to say we are the most humane country in the world, but we don't like to see the list we are on when discussing the "other" countries of the world that still use executions of some sort. Lets face it...the 33 years the families of the victims in this case had to wait was such a long long time, and all of us funded his 33 years incarceration as well. But its the balance the US continues to look for in dealing with capital punishment cases in trying to maintain a humane look while we prepare to kill someone...a contradiction of terms in itself!

After working my entire adult life in prison environments and rubbing elbows with numerous dangerous human beings who acted like sub-humans more times than not, everyone reading this should be able to easily determine whether I am an advocate of capital punishment or not. However, while I am, the system is so greatly flawed I personally don't know if it is worth it or not. We spend thousand times over on the incarceration of criminals than we do on any programs for their victims....is it just me or do we have that backwards?

Somewhere along the way we've lost our way......

Pu239
284
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Pu239 07/17/11 - 12:41 pm
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Mr. Kammer and Dr. Waisel
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Mr. Kammer and Dr. Waisel seem to be out of touch with reality....It is my sincere hope that Mr. Blankenship suffered.

allhans
23615
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allhans 07/17/11 - 07:59 pm
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(

(

Willow Bailey
20580
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Willow Bailey 07/17/11 - 02:49 pm
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I think you are on the wrong

I think you are on the wrong story, allhans.

da-realist
8
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da-realist 07/17/11 - 02:57 pm
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Allhans?????

Allhans?????

southernguy08
499
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southernguy08 07/17/11 - 03:42 pm
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RETIRED, if I say yes, you'll
Unpublished

RETIRED, if I say yes, you'll accuse me of extremism. If I say no, you'll accuse me of being a hypocrite. You're not fooling anyone.

harley_52
23159
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harley_52 07/17/11 - 03:59 pm
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I rather liked the statement

I rather liked the statement made by the Florida Attorney General years ago when the progressives were wailing and whining that sparks and smoke were coming from the heads of those executed in the Florida Electric Chair so much so that the chair came to be known as "Ol' Smokey."

Progressives were nearly apoplectic. "It's cruel and inhumane," they insisted. "Stop all executions," they demanded.

When asked about the question, the Attorney General said he wasn't in favor of stopping the executions because he thought it might having a positive on crime. He said the message was "if you're thinking of murdering someone, maybe you don't want to do it in Florida because we seem to be having this 'little' problem with our electric chair."

I agree with Mr. Loper. Convicted murderers should be put to death quickly and in the same manner as that from which their victims died. Worrying about "cruel and inhmane" punishment for a heinous murderer is something reserved only in the realm of a dedicated progressive, whether they admit it, or not.

allhans
23615
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allhans 07/17/11 - 04:37 pm
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Yep! Lost in Space...

Yep! Lost in Space...

Willow Bailey
20580
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Willow Bailey 07/17/11 - 05:50 pm
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I am neither liberal nor

I am neither liberal nor progressive; but I would want to be certain.
Our system is flawed in many areas.

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/innocence-and-death-penalty

harley_52
23159
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harley_52 07/17/11 - 06:06 pm
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If you're talking about our

If you're talking about our judicial system (being flawed) I am in total agreement.

Too many criminals are let go for the flimsiest of reasons, or for no reason at all.

You don't have to look too far back to find notable cases where murderers, sometimes mass murderers, escape their just deserves simply as a result of our "flawed system."

The names Manson, Simpson, and Anthony spring immediately to mind.

Those who are convicted, sentenced to death, and ultimately not executed are almost always the beneficiary of some judicial slight of hand, or some legal loophole only money could buy.

The progressives would have you believe the ones who escaped the death penalty are all church going, family loving, hard working citizens who were wrongly charged by a pernicious law enforcement system and convicted by a judicial system that favors only the "rich."

Juries do make mistakes, but it's almost always to the favor of the criminal and because of efforts to be ultra-generous to the suspected criminal, especially in Capital cases.

Pu239
284
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Pu239 07/17/11 - 07:52 pm
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The only flaw in this justice
Unpublished

The only flaw in this justice is that it took 33 years to occur..." In the early morning hours Blankenship left a bar after a night of drinking and began to walk home. As he walked past the victim's upstairs apartment, he decided that he wanted to break in. The victim, Sarah Mims Bowen, was a 78-year-old woman for whom Blankenship had done repair work. He climbed up a railing to a porch of her apartment where he kicked out the lower pane of a window. After waiting and watching briefly, he entered the apartment, and grabbed Sarah from behind. Sarah struggled and fell and Blankenship fell on top of her. Sarah became unconscious, and Blankenship picked her up and took her back to her bed, where he raped her. Her bloody and nude body was discovered by friends and neighbors She had been severely beaten, scratched, bitten and forcibly raped. A plastic bottle of hand lotion had been forced into her vagina. Footprints left by an unusually patterned sole were found at the scene and led toward Blankenship's house. His fingerprints were also found at the scene, and shoes identical to the type that made the prints were recovered from his possession. After he was arrested by police, Blankenship made a confession. However, he denied that he beat Sarah Bowen severely, and at trial he recanted part of his confession and stated that he was unable to consummate the rape. Forensic evidence established that Sarah Bowen died from heart failure brought on by the trauma. Scrapings taken from the fingernails of the victim matched the blood type of Blankenship. The death sentence was imposed three separate times after two reversals."

rmwhitley
5547
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rmwhitley 07/17/11 - 08:28 pm
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The eye for eye is the only
Unpublished

The eye for eye is the only method scum understands. Seal Team 6 sought eye for eye retribution, literally. Give as much as scum deserve. Roaches have more worth than those animals on death row. Jury's do make mistakes. o.j. simpson and casey anthony come to mind. If you "moderates, lefties and defense attorneys" are so disgusted with the death penalty, why not donate some of your precious time in the heart of the criminals santuarys. you have all of the answers so it's only natural that you intercede with the criminals and show them the errors of their ways?

GaStang22
910
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GaStang22 07/17/11 - 11:34 pm
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I agree with this guy. These
Unpublished

I agree with this guy. These lowlifes shouldn't be coddled for 33 years wasting moral working peoples money before their sentence is carried out and why spend all this money on LI, a bullet is much cheaper. You can't deter any crimes with laws and sentences like this. Look at the millions we have wasted of that loser Brian Nichols, he should have been killed loooooong ago!!! Obviously the bleeding heart way isn't working, yet they refuse to admit it and cost thousands of other innocent people their lives.

copperhead
1035
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copperhead 07/18/11 - 01:52 am
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AMNESTY! for all criminals!

AMNESTY! for all criminals! IF 24 million non-citizens deserve amnesty,ALL citizens deserve no less! AMNESTY FOR ALL!

AutumnLeaves
7591
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AutumnLeaves 07/23/11 - 08:58 am
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It would cost a lot LESS

It would cost a lot LESS money if we did away with the barbaric practice of the death penalty. The appeals in death penalty cases can be notoriously many and all expensive, usually at the taxpayers' pain. A civilized society should not be involved in government-sanctioned premeditated murder. It is one thing defending oneself, one's children, or one's country to the death, but it is another calculating the premeditated death of another, no matter what the criminal offense of the person punished in this manner. I live in a country that does that, in a country with a court system, that no matter how lofty its goals, no matter how well it has done, is NOT infallible! It has put to death people who were later proven NOT GUILTY. If you want to look to the Bible to the OLD Testament and the eye for an eye scripture, weigh that against the larger fact that a human court system put our Lord, Jesus Christ, to death, who is and was not only NOT GUILTY, but the MOST INNOCENT of all! If that isn't a lesson for us, I don't know what is. Let the guilty suffer in their prisons. It is less expensive both economically and spiritually to do that, than for the American people, willing or unwilling, to be complicit in premeditated murder by allowing this type of sentence to continue to be carried out.

AutumnLeaves
7591
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AutumnLeaves 07/23/11 - 09:02 am
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Keep in mind, that if we do

Keep in mind, that if we do put to death someone who is proven not guilty in the future, unlike God, we can not raise him back up from the dead.

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