ASU could take fiscal lessons from Paine

  • Follow Letters

Regarding the education budget shortfall announced by Gov. Sonny Perdue for Georgia's institutions of higher learning;

Recently the budget reduction announced by the state amounted to approximately 30 percent for Augusta State University. William Bloodworth, president of Augusta State, said that the reductions would hurt Augusta State, and he is trying hard to find ways to soften the blow to the school's overall operations.

I would like to say to Dr. Bloodworth that perhaps now is the time for he and George C. Bradley to establish a dialogue.

Dr. Bradford, at Paine College, has been providing quality education to his students with comparatively meager funds. Paine has never, in its 128-year history, had the luxury of funds at the level Augusta State has enjoyed from the very first day of its existence. So now maybe a workshop with Paine by the financial personnel at Augusta State would be in order. I can't speak for Dr. Bradley, but I believe that he wouldn't mind providing the help ASU may need.

Some will see this letter as a slap at major white universities, and they perhaps would be right. But also see this as a wake-up call, because America has too often overlooked its state-supported black colleges and universities; this is no secret to all Americans, both black and white.

Augusta State, take your swing -- it's your turn at the economic plate. Black colleges and universities have been striking out for all too long, but they have grown and they have learned how to succeed.

Joseph Diggs Sr.

Augusta

Comments (8) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
Nat the Cat
1
Points
Nat the Cat 03/04/10 - 09:26 pm
0
0
You have got to be kidding!!!

You have got to be kidding!!!

Nat the Cat
1
Points
Nat the Cat 03/04/10 - 09:28 pm
0
0
Well, is it Bradford,

Well, is it Bradford, Bradley, Bloodworth, Bloodhound, or Blind? It sounds like a bad law firm.

corgimom
34239
Points
corgimom 03/05/10 - 03:26 am
0
0
If they handle money so well,

If they handle money so well, why is Augusta-Richmond County always giving them money? Does this mean that RC taxpayers no longer have to subsidize it through sales taxes?

dashiel
176
Points
dashiel 03/05/10 - 08:31 am
0
0
Paine has always managed to

Paine has always managed to attract and keep excellent professors, including several who hold Ivy League doctorates and publish widely enough that they are not dependent on their relatively meager salaries. Quality of this kind can only be earned. The best and the brightest students appear to value a quality education more than an impressive campus.

grouse
1635
Points
grouse 03/05/10 - 08:56 am
0
0
I don't think the letter
Unpublished

I don't think the letter writer is accurate regarding funding...this would make an interesting article.

lsmith
105
Points
lsmith 03/05/10 - 09:25 am
0
0
Diggs, How about comparing
Unpublished

Diggs, How about comparing apples to apples. Comparing Augusta State funding to Paine college's is simple math. Augusta State has an enrollment of over 6500 students. Paine college 882. So Augusta State is more than 6 times as large in needs and use of funds. 1,581 students at Augusta State are African American alone. So they're educating twice as many black students as does Paine College. I do not know what the total funding levels are at either college but common sense dictates Augusta State has a larger funding need and embraces a more diverse student population, something which also contributes to higher costs of education.
I guess there is some reason why Augusta State appeals more to students of all races, colors, creeds, religions and nationalities. It might be related to the quality of education they expect to receive there.
I don't really think Augusta State President could benefit much from a conversaton with George Bradley. However, Bradley might benefit from such a conversation.

livinginthebuckle
0
Points
livinginthebuckle 03/05/10 - 11:51 am
0
0
Will Paine college credits

Will Paine college credits transfer to other institutions now? I don't mean specialty courses like nursing. I mean core courses like English and Math. Last I heard, state colleges would not accept them from Paine but that was years ago and may have changed?

truth_be_told
223
Points
truth_be_told 03/05/10 - 11:57 am
0
0
Settle the arguement. Ask

Settle the arguement. Ask ANY potential employeer who would they rather hire--all other things being equal--a Paine graduate or an ASU graduate.

SouthernPride
0
Points
SouthernPride 03/06/10 - 08:32 am
0
0
Paine College is a joke. I

Paine College is a joke. I knew so many blacks that transferred to ASU because they felt the education they were getting at Paine was being handed to them due to their skin color. And there is no one teaching at Paine with an Ivy League degree. I actually have a friend that teaches there (couldn't find a jog anywhere else teaching at the college level) and tells me quite often that the curriculum is a joke.

They should close Paine down and let the Medical College expand into that space. After all, I don't know anyone who hires a Paine College graduate.

omnomnom
3964
Points
omnomnom 03/07/10 - 03:26 pm
0
0
most paine grads i know are

most paine grads i know are way behind the curve.. can barely handle entry level jobs.. isnt paine college getting a free gym from the city? hardly self sustaining. i had the "privilege" of going there to cover their view of the jena six case. such racist professors, goodness.. even better, was the (then) president of the school demanding everything i had on tape be "off the record"

Back to Top

Top headlines

Augusta's ties to Liberia date back to 1836

Richmond County’s ties to West Africa date back to the 1830s, when plantation owner Richard Tubman wrote in his will that his slaves were to be offered freedom. More recently, Augustans have ...
Search Augusta jobs