Parents should take responsibility

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Parents have responsibility for their children. It is unfair to expect a teacher to raise your children. You brought them into this world, and you are the one to rear them, love them and care for them.

When a child is not doing well in school, do not blame the teacher; blame yourself for not paying attention to what your child is doing, and not properly handling the information the child's teacher provides you.

Seldom, if ever, does a teacher pick on a child.

If they say your child is not paying attention in class, then you must correct him. If your child's grades are falling behind, you must be creative; take something away from the child at home until grades improve.

Step in, take control of your family, know what your children are doing and help them to learn.

Read to them when they are young, help them as they grow, be certain that they are in the right activities and enjoy the process.

Education starts in pre-kindergarten in the school system, but it starts with you parents at their birth. Do your job.

Jean Brackett

Hephzibah

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johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 02/20/10 - 02:18 am
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Jean, the unintended

Jean, the unintended consequences of "helping" by taking from some to give to others (Robin Hood) or buying Dem votes or whatever the responsibility free subsidy system was intended for, has led to the promotion of the "...it's nobody's fault" mentality. Your comments are described as "racist" by those in denial and as hurtful by those not concerned. The enabling government action of attempting to "level the playing field" has created a mess that is unlikely to end before a major social change takes place in this country. This is the fuel for burning the country to the ground and we're well past the smoke stage.

orgpsych
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orgpsych 02/20/10 - 04:40 am
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Good morning, J.C. I'm not

Good morning, J.C. I'm not trying to be adversarial here but I don't quite see how the comment you posted here is directly connected to the letter written.

Ms Brackett (I assume Ms), I agree with what you wrote somewhere around 98%. Far too many parents "give up" their responsibility for raising their children to the school system that is really not prepared to handle that task. Unfortunately, they also work hard to retain their rights as parents. When the teacher does something they disagree with many parents drop big rocks on the teacher and the school until they change whatever is "offensive," even though the situation that started everything has not been changed at all.

Parents need to take responsibility for their children and their actions. As the children grow older they can loosen the controls somewhat but only if the basic foundation of responsible adulthood has been established.

The other 2% or so has to do with the quality of teachers that are out there. Most are wonderful people and I have been glad, even proud, to let them have my children to teach. There have been a few, though, that seem to treat children and parents as enemies to be held at bay. I had a number of conferences with teachers of one of my children that I walked away from wondering what that was all about.

A particularly memorable "meeting" involved my wife and me sitting in tiny chairs while a team of teachers (3) told us how bad our child was. Most of what was said seemed more like a simple diffrence of opinion than any kind of empirical fact. One teacher, though, was particularly scathing because she had handed out a quiz and the children were supposed to fill in the small circles to indicate their response. My child used the small circles to draw little animals, only on one circle per item (his answers). She was livid that he had failed to follow instructions. I asked her if he had passed the quiz and was told that she refused to even grade it. Bottom line: My child was bored stiff and had quietly amused himself while taking the quiz.

The system is not equipped to deal with bright children (not necessarily geniuses, just bright) who need more challenge. I see this as a predictable by-product of No Child Left Behind. Another unintended by-product is teachers who are ill equipped, because of poor training or simply being overwhelmed with the number of students, to deal with anyone who doesn't fit that standard mold of a "good child." While my child's abberant behavior was fairly mild and more on the "positive" side, I have seen many whose behavior veered very much to the negative side. All are lumped into the classroom as equals.

J.C., if your anti-Democrat message was intended to place the blame for this on that party, let me remind you that No Child Left Behind was a Republican program. It has been criticized by educators from the get-go.

To do a better job teachers need some help and that help, as you pointed out Ms Brackett, has to start with the parents caring about their children.

Dixieman
15357
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Dixieman 02/20/10 - 08:18 am
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Nice letter and true.

Nice letter and true. Parent-teacher conference attendance rates in the CSRA public schools are below 50%, even though parents are strongly encouraged and invited to attend at a convenient time. Kids are our responsibility, amen.

southernguy08
499
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southernguy08 02/20/10 - 09:23 am
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ORG, thanks, you have just
Unpublished

ORG, thanks, you have just shown the need for public schools to have real competition from private schools. School vouchers would make public schools strive harder to make students perform and achieve. Unfortunately, the NEA will never allow this to happen, and the union minded Dem Party will never go along.

WW1949
19
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WW1949 02/20/10 - 09:49 am
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ORGP, THAT IS WHY THERE IS

ORGP, THAT IS WHY THERE IS STILL THE NEED FOR ACCELERATED CLASSES SO THAT GIFTED STUDENTS HAVE MORE CHALLENGES AND DO NOT GET BORED. SUCH WAS THE CASE WHEN I WENT TO RICHMOND ACADEMY EVEN THOUGH I WASN'T IN THOSE CLASSES. I WAS JUST A NORMAL STUDENT WITH NORMAL PARENTS WHO TOOK PART IN MY LIFE ALONG WITH MOST OF THE PARENT STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS. MY PARENTS BACKED THE TEACHERS AND THERE WAS NEVER A GET UP IN YOUR FACE CONFROTATION IF I HAD A PROBLEM. NOT THAT WAY NOW WITH THE SCHOOL MAKEUP AND THE WAY CHILDREN ARE HAVING CHILDREN AND LEAVING IT UP TO EVERYBODY ELSE TO TAKE CARE AND PROVIDE FOR THEM. TOO BAD FOR THE CHILDREN BECAUSE THOSE THAT ARE RAISED LIKE THAT DO NOT HAVE A CHANCE.

disssman
6
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disssman 02/20/10 - 11:37 am
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I think Jean is partially

I think Jean is partially right but teachers still must at least make an effort to teach. As an example of that I pulled up the Crosscreek math department to see what the calendar of events shows for each math teacher in the school. Guess what less than 50 percent of teachers use the system at all and of the other 50% very few have anything more than a half hearted effort at posting something. Now I understand the need for parents to be involved, but why can't a teacher take 3 minutes to post what her class is doing? Is there a policy in the system for posting? If not, then why do we spend literally hundreds of thousands for a software program that is little used? P.S. It might be a good idea for the school or the BOE to post a telephone number that someone may answer after 3:00 in the afternoon. It seems they don't want to be bothered with questions throughout the entire system.

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