Move all helpless victims out of Haiti

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We have all witnessed horrifying pictures on the news and in the newspapers of the devastating effects of the earthquake in Haiti.

We all see the aid that we are trying to send to these people. I read in the newspaper there are 1.5 million homeless in this country at this time. I read that the roads are not passable, the airport is damaged and the port is practically unreachable.

What I don't understand is why there has been little evacuation of the seriously wounded, babies, small children, pregnant women and the elderly. I saw a picture in the newspaper of an elderly man lying in the street begging for water. The nursing home he was a resident of had been demolished and there was no place for them. There is no food, no water, no shelter and very little medical attention.

When Katrina hit the United States, we were unable to send in aid fast enough and had to start evacuation procedures to get the people out of the area so they could obtain food, water, shelter and the medical services necessary to sustain human life. If we were unable to get the aid to New Orleans in a timely manner with all of our resources, how can we possibly get them to Haiti?

I think we need to use the planes and ships we have to temporarily move these people out of this area to safety. The healthy people can stay behind to help clean and rebuild their country, but the helpless should not be left there to do without. Can we not see that this is the necessary and humanitarian thing to do, or are we afraid if we move them out they may not want to go back?

Emilie C. Bowles

Sylvania

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soldout
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soldout 02/05/10 - 12:45 am
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Without being there I don't

Without being there I don't think any of us can grasp how big the problems are at this time. The best we can hope for is temporary help to substain life but their long-term problem is spiritual. New Orleans had the same type of problem with some of the same spiritual reasons. When people in the superdome wouldn't go to safety because the buses weren't air conditioned you soon realized you had a people problem as well as a storm problem. All answers happen in the spiritual realm before you see them in the natural. The other half of the island does well but not Haiti. So few people are strong enough to state the real causes of problems so the majority just does a temporary fix to feel good that they have done something. It is wonderful and good to help people but if you don't also help their spirit it is like restoring an old car to perfection and then pushing it off the cliff. We have lots of reality shows on TV but few in government and leadership of all kinds who actually speak and do according to reality.

Dixieman
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Dixieman 02/05/10 - 07:29 am
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They don't need evacuation.

They don't need evacuation. They need a sane government on site. Haiti has a great climate and location and some decent natural resources, just a humongous corruption and misgovernment problem.

lnegronp
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lnegronp 02/05/10 - 09:11 am
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It indeed is a sad situation

It indeed is a sad situation and my heart goes out to the people of Haiti. I too have donated to the cause but I look back at the homeless here in America and think...why isn't anyone helping them? So many people here have found themselves without jobs, without homes & without food, etc. due to the fall of the economy but no one is really helping them. Sure they will have unemployment but for how long? Where is their shelter? Where is their food? Where are the generous people in Hollywood helping them? Where was the telethons? Where were the donation buckets? Where was RedCross? And if you ask me where was I? I was collecting blankets, jackets and sleeping bags for them....so where were you?

jb5365
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jb5365 02/05/10 - 09:19 am
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OK, how about if we send them

OK, how about if we send them all to your house...

NoCatchyName
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NoCatchyName 02/05/10 - 09:22 am
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Emilie, you have a good heart

Emilie, you have a good heart and a generous nature, but your suggestion is not workable. The infrastructure of that country is shattered. The government there, never a model of efficiency, is in a shambles and a state of near paralysis. The good people who have gone there to help have, as yet, not been able to set up a system for the consistent and reliable distribution of water, food, or medical supplies.

How much more difficult would it be to try to bring these people to medical help than to take medical help to them? Currently the simpler task is beyond reach. If food can not be transported out and distributed how could the ill be collected and transported back? Where and how would they be triaged? Some people in that situation are fighting over food. What do you think would happen if they were offered the prospect of escaping altogether?

change display name
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change display name 02/05/10 - 09:58 am
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Many of the critically ill

Many of the critically ill were transported to hospitals in Florida and the other Gulf Coast states. Who is going to care for them after they are well? You? I hope you have a large guest bedroom and kitchen.

dichotomy
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dichotomy 02/05/10 - 10:57 am
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Notice that none of these

Notice that none of these patients are being flown to countries with universal socialized healthcare like Cuba, Venezuela, or Canada. Could that be because we already have the best medical care in the world and that it IS accessible to people with zero money. I wonder how their priority and payment would be handled under our proposed healthcare reform?

Chillen
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Chillen 02/05/10 - 11:38 am
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Unfortunately they can't be

Unfortunately they can't be brought here. First, who would pay for the medical care? Haiti certainly won't. And we can't either. At present, the U.S. is out of money, we can hardly help ourselves. Second, once they are here they would certainly remain here - with major handicaps & disabilities to strain our medicaid/welfare system. If you tried to send them home people would be crawling out of the woodwork to say how inhumane it would be to send them home. "They've built a life here now".

Dixieman's suggestion is the best. They need a proper govt to handle them for the long term. I've been to the island, on the Dominican Republic side. The land on that island is beautiful and prosperous when it is well managed like they do on the Dominican side.

For the short term, there are plenty of medical professionals and volunteers over there helping. The situation is horrible but I believe we are doing all we can. I'm not saying that it is enough, but it is all we can do.

deekster
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deekster 02/05/10 - 11:49 am
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Compassion without wisdom.

Compassion without wisdom. Only Americans would presume that they "want to leave their sovereign country". Help them as we would want to be helped.

deekster
24
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deekster 02/05/10 - 11:53 am
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We can't seem to let go of

We can't seem to let go of the idea of "making everyone in the world be a little American". It destroyed t he Native American Culture. It destroyed the African American Culture. Everyone does not want to be an American. They surely want our money. They don't want our politics, religion or our rules.

CobaltGeorge
153714
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CobaltGeorge 02/05/10 - 01:24 pm
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I didn't see this or I

I didn't see this or I wouldn't have posted under the Rants & Raves.
Subject: [Association of Retired Phoenix Officers] Haiti

I got this from a good friend of mine and I did not correct any language to leave it in it's original form......................................................................how sad this is!

To All,

I just returned from Haiti with Hebler. We flew in at 3 AM Sunday to the scene of such incredible destruction on one side, and enormous ineptitude and criminal neglect on the other.

Port of Prince is in ruins. The rest of the country is fairly intact.Our team was a rescue team and we carried special equipment that locates people buried under the rubble. There are easily 200,000 dead, the city smells like a charnal house. The bloody UN was there for 5 years doing apparently nothing but wasting US Taxpayers money. The ones I ran into were either incompetent or outright anti American. Most are French or French speakers, worthless every damn one of them. While 18oo rescuers were ready willing and able to leave the airport and go do our jobs, the UN and USAID ( another organization full of little OBamites and communists that openly speak against America) These two organizations exemplared their parochialism by:

USAID, when in control of all inbound flights, had food and water flights stacked up all the way to Miami, yet allowed Geraldo Rivera, Anderson Cooper and a host of other left wing news puppies to land.

Pulled all the security off the rescue teams so that Bill Clinton and his wife could have the grand tour, whilst we sat unable to get to people trapped in the rubble.

Stacked enough food and water for the relief over at the side of the airfield then put a guard on it while we dehydrated and wouldn't release a drop of it to the rescuers.

No shower facilities to decontaminate after digging or moving corpses all day, except for the FEMA teams who brought their own shower and decon equipment, as well as air conditioned tents.

No latrine facilities, less digging a hole if you set up a [filtered word] everyone was trying to use it.

I watched a 25 year old Obamite with the USAID shrieking hysterically, berate a full bird colonel in the air force, because he countermanded her orders, whilst trying to unscrew the air pattern. " You don't know what your president wants! The military isn't in charge here we are!"

If any of you are thinking of giving money to the Haitian relief, or to the UN don't waste your money. It will only go to further the goals of the French and the Liberal left.

If we are a fair and even society, why is it that only white couples are adopting Haitian orphans. Where the hell is that vocal minority that is always screaming about the injustice of American society.

Bad place, bad situation, but a perfect look at the new world order in action. New Orleans magnified a thousand times. Haiti doesn't need democracy, what Haiti needs is Papa Doc. That's not just my opinion , that is what virtually every Haitian we talked with said. the French run the UN treat us the same as when we were a colony, at least Papa Doc ran the country.

Oh, and as a last slap in the face the last four of us had to take US AIRWAYs home from Phoenix. They slapped me with a 590 dollar baggage charge for the four of us. The girl at the counter was almost in tears because she couldn't give us a discount or she would lose her job. Pass that on to the flying public.

Nick
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veritas14
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veritas14 02/05/10 - 02:01 pm
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I was in both Port-au-Prince

I was in both Port-au-Prince and Cap Hatien when Aristede was restored to power in '94 and 16 years later, Haiti is the same cesspool it was then. Very little in natural resources, virtually nothing in productivity and rampant corruption at all levels. American generosity was ineffective in '94 and beyond humanitarian assistance will be ineffective again. Same thing in Somalia in '93, look at the changes made in that country after we poured in millions of taxpayer dollars. No change. It is exactly as it was before. It appears Americans have big hearts but small brains, We simply refuse to learn from past experiences.

Chillen
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Chillen 02/05/10 - 02:09 pm
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Great letter cobaltgeorge,

Great letter cobaltgeorge, thanks for posting here.

CobaltGeorge
153714
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CobaltGeorge 02/05/10 - 02:14 pm
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Some of you may already know

Some of you may already know this but I will post anyway.
In the 1700's what is now Haiti was called the "Jewel of the Caribbean," and supplied about 40% of the world's sugar.

In 1791 the government of France passed legislation to phase out slavery in its Caribbean colonies and grant the former Negro slaves citizenship. Rather than becoming citizens, Haiti's Negro population mass murdered all whites and Mulattoes who could not flee the island in time. In 1804 only full-blooded Negroes remained and Haiti became the first Negro-ruled nation. The Haitian revolution dominated America's debate over slavery. While both the North and the South agreed that slavery should be ended, southerners and a large percentage of northerners universally opposed having a large population of freed slaves living in their midst. The Haitian "Revolution" was fresh in every one's mind.

Flash forward to 1915. The "Jewel of the Caribbean" is now a desolate cesspool, that is exporting almost no sugar. The United States decides to " take up the white man's burden" and send the U.S. Marine Corps to rebuild Haiti's infrastructure and feed it's starving population.

The United States gave huge amounts of money to Haiti and over-saw the building of 1,000 miles of road, telephone lines, modernized its port and helped Haiti to start exporting sugar once again. The U.S. also put an end to the thousands of bandits along Haiti's border with the Dominican Republic. The U.S. left in 1934 at the request of the then stabilized - and very ungrateful - Haitian government.

Haiti immediately sank straight back into total desolation and strife. In

1973 the United State once again began playing a huge role in Haiti, giving the island huge sums of money in handouts each year.

In 1994 the Clinton administration once again sent the U.S. military to Haiti to rebuild the island's infrastructure.

In 1995 the Peace Corps went to Haiti in large numbers to train the Haitians in job skills. The U.S. government spent almost one billion dollars providing food and job training to the Haitians between '95 and '99.

So, when Obama says that Haiti has our "full, unwavering, support," they have already had our full support since 1915.

soldout
1280
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soldout 02/05/10 - 08:01 pm
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Countries are fixed just like

Countries are fixed just like people...from the inside out and never from the outside in.

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