Faces of our future

Desperately needed medical professionals are key to saving U.S. health care

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Match Day at Georgia Regents University’s Medical College of Georgia is a spectacle.

Jessie Crabbe (middle) celebrates after she learns she was selected to do her residency at the University of Florida's Shands Hospital during Match Day at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University in Augusta on March 21. Our newest medical graduates are a vital part of health care's future.  MICHAEL HOLAHAN/STAFF
MICHAEL HOLAHAN/STAFF
Jessie Crabbe (middle) celebrates after she learns she was selected to do her residency at the University of Florida's Shands Hospital during Match Day at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University in Augusta on March 21. Our newest medical graduates are a vital part of health care's future.

The annual event, in which fourth-year medical students find out where they will begin their residency programs, is colorful, emotional and jubilant. Many students don outrageous costumes and blow off steam – deservedly so – when they receive the envelopes that divulge their residency destinations.

The enthusiasm and compassion of aspiring doctors is a reminder of the medical profession’s highly personal, highly intimate social contract. They remind us that it’s people, not governments, who have your best wellness decisions in mind in the increasingly bureaucratic business of medicine.

Their happy faces form the collective face of the future of U.S. health care.

These young people are the ones most capable of fixing our nation’s health care problems.

America is going to need every single one of them – and a lot more: Nearly half of all U.S. doctors are older than 50. The country’s physician shortfall could be as high as 150,000 doctors in the next decade.

The shortage will be worst in rural areas, where 20 percent of the U.S. population lives but less than 5 percent of doctors work.

Moreover, the number of residency slots – for post-graduate, real-world training – has not kept pace with the number of medical students since the federal government capped residency funding in 1997.

Georgia is hurting more than most. The state ranked 39th in the ratio of doctors per 100,000 population in 2010, the most recent year for available data.

President Obama’s 2015 budget proposal for $5 billion in new physician training programs is a bright spot. It calls for training 13,000 primary care residents over the next 10 years, as well as increasing the National Health Service Corps from 8,900 primary care providers a year to 15,000 a year.

This is the right way for the government to encourage growth in the health care field. In contrast, Obamacare encourages the growth of paperwork while discouraging the practice of medicine.

Doctors are expensive and, in too many places, rare. We should be focused on ways to make them less so.

America desperately needs more health care professionals and more residency slots, particularly in underserved rural areas. That’s how you save health care – not by feeding tax dollars to some sprawling government beast that spews red tape.

Earlier we mentioned the faces of health care’s future. One of those faces belongs to Guilly Rebagay of Martinez. If you saw The Augusta Chronicle’s front-page March 22 story about Match Day, you read about him being awarded a residency spot at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, one of the teaching affiliates of Harvard Medical School.

You also probably saw Mr. Rebagay in the big front-page photo. He was the young man celebrating in the red Power Ranger costume.

We’re familiar with Guilly, and couldn’t be prouder.

He was one of the 25 top high-school seniors The Chronicle selected for its annual Best and Brightest Award in 2006. He was president of Augusta Prep’s student council. He’s been a tutor and a food bank volunteer. He’s active in his church. He’s a superb pianist.

We challenge you to find a kinder, more well-rounded young man. We suspect dictionary editors interview Guilly whenever they want to fine-tune their definition of “altruism.”

We need more eager,
enthusiastic aspiring physicians like him.

Lots of them.

Fast.

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Young Fred
22352
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Young Fred 03/30/14 - 01:39 am
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yippie kiya

Very heartening because we have this: "..In contrast, Obamacare encourages the growth of paperwork while discouraging the practice of medicine..."

But then we have this: "Their happy faces form the collective face of the future of U.S. health care. These young people are the ones most capable of fixing our nation’s health care problems."

Tis exactly why I continue to support the gem we have downtown! Ya, jerkwads contine to try and "f" up a good thing by forcing the unenforceable - or at least the "illadvised enforceable" but so far peeps are standing by what they think are "best".

Bodhisattva
8083
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Bodhisattva 03/30/14 - 06:41 am
2
7
"Obamacare encourages the growth of paperwork" Total bull

The Affordable Care Act pushes the use and implementation of electronic records which REDUCES the amount of paperwork. The only way there is any increase in paperwork is that more people are insured, but there will be less paperwork per patient. I'm very aware the Chronicle editorial staff often works from talking point sheets sent out by right wing think tanks. Since this little ditty popped on on one of Heritage's pages, and with Jim Deminted's post at Heritage, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it came from them. Opinion is one thing. Deliberately passing what you know as false information to the public is another. This paper should be ashamed at such a desperate and underhanded ploy.

edcushman
7930
Points
edcushman 03/30/14 - 07:33 am
5
1
"The Affordable Care Act
Unpublished

"The Affordable Care Act pushes the use and implementation of electronic records which REDUCES the amount of paperwork."
bod, accounting to my primary doctor and my eye specialist they are spending more time entering data and less treating patients. Both have said they will not take ANY NEW Medicare or Medicaid patients because of the paper work and the cuts in what they pay. You should become better informed before making statements.
You "should be ashamed at such a desperate and underhanded ploy".

Riverman1
99153
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Riverman1 03/30/14 - 08:12 am
4
0
University Hosp Not In The Match Box

How many of those grads will University Hospital provide resident slots for?

Truth Matters
8620
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Truth Matters 03/30/14 - 08:14 am
1
6
I am very grateful that my

I am very grateful that my physicians use electronic records. Certain records can be accessed right from my home when needed. I can send questions, schedule appointments, and complete many other tasks outside of office hours. This saves time and gas when I don't have to drive across town to complete these tasks.

Alert: Expect the next few days' editorials and letters to the editor to be heavy on the anti-ACA side. It's a last ditch effort to deter as many people as possible from signing up for the ACA before the March 31 deadline.

Never mind that the politicians pushing so hard against the ACA already have the best healthcare taxpayers can buy. There is something ethically bankrupt with this picture.

Truth Matters
8620
Points
Truth Matters 03/30/14 - 08:14 am
0
2
I am very grateful that my

I am very grateful that my physicians use electronic records. Certain records can be accessed right from my home when needed. I can send questions, schedule appointments, and complete many other tasks outside of office hours. This saves time and gas when I don't have to drive across town to complete these tasks.

Alert: Expect the next few days' editorials and letters to the editor to be heavy on the anti-ACA side. It's a last ditch effort to deter as many people as possible from signing up for the ACA before the March 31 deadline.

Never mind that the politicians pushing so hard against the ACA already have the best healthcare taxpayers can buy. There is something ethically bankrupt with this picture.

Truth Matters
8620
Points
Truth Matters 03/30/14 - 08:16 am
0
0
Oops! Sorry about the double

Oops! Sorry about the double post.

ymnbde
11019
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ymnbde 03/30/14 - 08:29 am
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first, we should have gotten the doctors

then we would not have needed the O'care
and if poor kids are given the same choice as rich kids
in the form of school choice
we'll have more doctors
but will O do that?
nO, O wOn't dO that
O will do something that causes more of this
THREE SCHOOLS IN RICHMOND COUNTY
HAD ZERO STUDENTS PASS THE AP EXAMS LAST YEAR

deestafford
34353
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deestafford 03/30/14 - 08:32 am
3
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I know of no other profession which requires so much..

I know of no other profession which requires so much education and post-education training than does that of becoming a doctor. Then, and only then, can they begin to early any money. My hat is off and they have my deep gratitude for their hard work and dedication to making our lives better and healthier.

Unfortunately, the career and calling upon which they are embarking is vastly different and will become more different than it was when they made their career choices. That is because of interference and hindering by the government and specifically the Democrats and their push for Obamacare.

Bod, as far as electronic medical records go it will cost hundreds of thousands of dollars for small doctors to convert and much more for doctors with large practices to convert. It's so easy for the left to say, "Just hire someone to do it." with no idea that will be an additional cost on the doctor without any increase in benefit.

On top of this electronic medical records hoax of benefiting there is a change in the codes the doctors have to send to insurance companies as to what the ailment or injury maybe. This is an international requirement which has increased the number of codes from a few thousand to tens of thousands. Another requirement placed upon the medical profession which increases cost with no increase in income or benefit.

A combination of ignorance and stupidity on the part of the left/statists led by the incompetent Obama, his handlers, and the Democrats in Congress have changed what was the best healthcare system in the world toward another inefficient government run program.

Why is it we have so many stupid people who think that the government can do anything better than the private sector? Protecting the country with the military should be the primary mission of the federal government; yet, we are willing to turn over almost total control of our lives to some cubicle dweller in DC who knows absolutely nothing about what goes on in the real world in the area in which they have been assigned a task.

soldout
1287
Points
soldout 03/30/14 - 09:10 am
1
1
the problem is being fixed

The solution to this need for more doctors is being solved by energy medicine methods that are being done by a few and being taught to others. Some say these methods could reduce the number of doctors needed from 50-70%. There are some great doctors but many are just pushing drugs to help people get by and very little healing is going on these days. Basically only a few find the root cause for things. It isn't their fault. It is the way they are taught and the influence of the drug companies. There is not only hope in people discovering energy medicine like NAET and EFT but I see doctors in Augusta in very high positions that understand these approaches and are using them. Their attitude is, "lets fix folks no matter what the approach". In some of the younger medical folks I see hope in that they realize much of the approach has been wrong. When I show them simple methods about the electrical system that runs the immune system or point them to books like "Cross Currents" by Dr. Becker they get very excited and wonder why is this information so unknown. There are people today that can be told by phone that someone is sick and in 5 minutes determine what is wrong with them; make the electrical adjustment remotely, and have the person feeling better in a little while, you then know there is hope. No doctor trip, no time used by the patient, no drug, no herb, no supplement and no side effects. These new doctors will be blessed with this help and if they choose to learn some energy methods along the way they will run circles around their associates and have much more job satisfaction.

carcraft
30108
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carcraft 03/30/14 - 09:43 am
3
0
Truth Matters, electronic

Truth Matters, electronic record keeping has not improved efficiency or reduced cost as the arrogant Obama and his minions thought. Of course never having done anything other than community organizing how would he know? Where I work electronic record keeping is a hassle. I have screens freeze up and I reboot, so I am taking care of the computer instead of the patient. I have to delete entries that auto populate to meet the demand of some bureaucrat somewhere that do not apply to my current patient. When I print a record I have to boot up, log on, click, sign in click, print etc. It takes more time than you can imagine. I am not alone in these feelings. Here is a New York Times article. Doctors are now hiring scribes to deal with the REQUIRED electronic record keeping! So instead of reducing costs we now have another level health care provider added to the system that has to be paid for. Did I mention we also need to maintain an IT department to keep the whole system running? It is a complete mess, and you also have to worry about cyber security with the HIPPA rules etc. in place. http://ri.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0LEV7mTKThTOCgAFEgPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByMG... If there is anything confidential or you don't want made public I would not get my reports or records placed on the internet.

itsanotherday1
49959
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itsanotherday1 03/30/14 - 09:59 am
2
0
"Paperwork" is a generic term

"Paperwork" is a generic term for documentation, not a literal description. Talk about finding a nit to pick to create a diversion from the FACTS!

t3bledsoe
14291
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t3bledsoe 03/30/14 - 12:17 pm
0
2
General comment

FINNALLY the ACES tells the real truth about why there is going to be such a need for more health proffesionals. It is not necessarily The ACA, BUT that doctors older than 50 are going to retire at an alarming rate!! I will go so far as to recommend that health proffesionals be given a pass on some of these UNNECESSARY years of internship!! With the Internet and Google BEING FULL of medical information, why not teach these medical professionals how to use the Internet more wisely to determine a diagnossis!! This idea brings health care into the 21st century and NOT CONTINUEING the old and out-dated way of teaching and allowing health care proffesionals to do an exelent job much more quickly!! GET WITH THE MODERN DAY PROGRAM!!!!

t3bledsoe
14291
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t3bledsoe 03/30/14 - 12:41 pm
0
2
Bodhisattva @ 7:41

"The Affordable Care Act pushes the use and implementation of electronic records which REDUCES the amount of paperwork. The only way there is any increase in paperwork is that more people are insured, but there will be less paperwork per patient"

I agree that electronic capabilities are the way to go! I don't know about other doctors' offices, BUT my doctor's office seems to be running very well with electronics with only seldom need for "paper" scripts for medications.

edcushman
7930
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edcushman 03/30/14 - 02:10 pm
3
0
"I am very grateful that my
Unpublished

"I am very grateful that my physicians use electronic records."
TM, I saw an article about doctors that could not afford to put in the equipment required by Obamacare. Some were retiring but most will not be taking Medicare or Medicaid. Obamacare is going to destroy health in this country but then that is the plan of Marxists/democrats. There will be a single payer system within the next 10 years with every one receiving poor healthcare.

carcraft
30108
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carcraft 03/30/14 - 02:29 pm
3
0
T 3bledsoe, read my link and

T 3bledsoe, read my link and my comment to Bod. There is a whole new level of health care employee called a scribe who does the computer charting for the Doctor adding to the expense of health care.

fedex227
11192
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fedex227 03/30/14 - 06:59 pm
0
0
.
Unpublished

.

Bizkit
37131
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Bizkit 03/30/14 - 08:13 pm
1
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HIPAA is officially a joke

HIPAA is officially a joke with Medical records because the ease of hacking into these-just a matter of time when this will have malice or political consequences likely.

Bizkit
37131
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Bizkit 03/30/14 - 09:10 pm
0
0
Car you forgot about the

Car you forgot about the added expense of staffing just to deal with insurance related issues. Overhead is increasing for physicians with 60% or more in overhead it's ridiculous."Overhead for a physician practice has increased substantially over the past 15 years. With reimbursements dropping, malpractice costs rising and salaries for employees increasing, the overhead percentage increase for a physician practice has outpaced the consumer price index significantly. This means that physicians are working the same or harder for substantially less money than they did 15 years ago.
Most physicians believe that their practice’s overhead is somewhere between 40% and 50% of their charges. The truth is that in today’s medical practices, it is actually between 60% and 70%."

carcraft
30108
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carcraft 03/30/14 - 09:42 pm
1
0
Bizkit, that one person

Bizkit, that one person (scribe) is just to deal with electronic record keeping!

iaaffg
3182
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iaaffg 04/04/14 - 05:55 am
0
0
emr may reduce the physical
Unpublished

emr may reduce the physical paperwork, but believe me, if you have to print out an emr record, it has waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more paperwork to it than a regular old paper medical chart. i know, i am a medical record reviewer and have reviewed thousands upon thousands of both types of records. i also used to work at bedside and experienced the joys of emr, and whoever pointed out the problems with actually charting emr-style makes a valid point: when you spend so much time on a computer, waiting for this screen or that screen or for it to unfreeze or re-boot, this is loss of time that can be spent w/a patient rather than a machine. the one definite pro for emr is that one can actually read what is written in the chart rather than try to decipher chicken scratch marks (the penmanship of the majority of people in health care is abysmal). many older docs are refusing to install emr systems in their offices b/c of the expense and hassle and little payback in return; they are going to retire soon rather than put up with all this government mandated garbage being shoved down their throats. and who can blame them? so you'll have a medical field full of little newbie docs running around and no older docs who have the experience, and where will that leave our precious healthcare? good luck, y'all, i'm going to lean towards functional medicine rather than this traditional Big Pharma westernized stuff currently on the menu in the u.s.a. that's designed to keep you enslaved to your doctor and the corner pharmacy store for the remainder of your life.

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