Paine management

Newest leaders ready to guide college through its difficulties

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If you’d like, for a moment, to escape the bustle of a new semester at the still freshly merged Georgia Regents University Augusta, we’d invite you to the other side of 15th Street, where a pair of new leadership appointments could be signaling the start of a brighter era for Paine College.

Paine College has taken on new leadership to help steer the institution out of financial difficulties.   ZACH BOYDEN-HOLMES/FILE
ZACH BOYDEN-HOLMES/FILE
Paine College has taken on new leadership to help steer the institution out of financial difficulties.

It has been a tough past couple of years for Paine. Questions over allegations of financial improprieties have threatened the school’s accreditation. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools’ Commission on Colleges sanctioned Paine last year and this year regarding use of federal and student aid – allegedly diverting education money to past-due bills and payroll, and failing to return unused federal aid for students who withdrew.

Now, two newly appointed leaders aim to turn the school around.

Edward Patrick, Clark Atlanta University’s former controller, is Paine’s new vice president of administrative and fiscal affairs. Samuel Sullivan is Paine’s provost and vice president of academic affairs – posts he had held on an interim basis since March.

Mr. Patrick’s 20-plus years of finance and accounting experience will be applied to Paine’s complicated financial situation. Dr. Sullivan’s mission also lies comfortably within his area of expertise: charting paths for student success. He aims to draw higher-achieving students to campus and to expand the college’s research opportunities.

Paine’s students and faculty couldn’t ask for two better people to guide them to greater accomplishments.

We hope Paine’s financial problems can be resolved with all deliberate speed. Anyone who cares about one of Georgia’s oldest colleges should want to know precisely what happened at Paine and how it will assure that it won’t occur again.

Paine cannot be allowed to fail. Its cultural and economic impact is too important to Augusta. The college that has produced such figures as acclaimed author Frank Yerby and civil rights leader Joseph Lowery deserves the opportunity to recover from its difficulties, and it deserves the unswerving support of the entire community to help make that happen.

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corgimom
27745
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corgimom 08/26/13 - 06:43 am
5
0
You can't force people to

You can't force people to attend a certain school, and they can't compete against the Hope Scholarship.

Bizkit
29143
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Bizkit 08/26/13 - 08:33 am
4
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The problem is the last four

The problem is the last four years both positions have been replaced each year with highly qualified people-each time the supposed savior of their problems. Yet problems persists.

soldout
1280
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soldout 08/26/13 - 09:05 am
3
0
missing one quality

apparently the quality of honesty has been missing so those leaders will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

RMSHEFF
13826
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RMSHEFF 08/26/13 - 09:07 am
2
1
It sound like the same people

It sound like the same people that ran Detroit and been running Paine. I only hope the students don't pick up on the management style.

deestafford
23536
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deestafford 08/26/13 - 09:12 am
2
1
I really hope Paine can be saved and prosper.

There is a need for historical black colleges because some blacks come out of high school unprepared to succeed in college yet will bloom and become successful in life because of their time and experiences at a college like Paine.

Too many times black students are lured to some colleges who want to pad their "diversity" figures and the students not being ready for that level of academics becomes frustrated and drop out. Those that go to schools like Paine grow, flourish, and become leaders in society and make this a better world.

Little Lamb
43821
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Little Lamb 08/26/13 - 09:25 am
4
0
Low

From the story:

Dr. Samuel Sullivan aims to draw higher-achieving students to campus and to expand the college’s research opportunities.

You have to wonder what past and present administrators were thinking when they decided to take in low-achieving students. Did they think the low-achieving students would absorb good study habits and good work ethic from others by osmosis? Did they think swelling the student population with low-achieving students would be a rising tide that would lift all boats?

Sorry, it does not work that way in real life. If you fill a school with low-achieving students, you create a low-achieving school.

I wish Dr. Sullivan success, but I must admit the truth of Bizkit's 8:33 comment.

MTBer
547
Points
MTBer 08/26/13 - 09:40 am
3
1
Not needed

There is no "need" for a historically black college. There is, however, a need for good colleges: some big, some small. Why does the double standard continue unabated, and unchallenged?

soapy_725
43553
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soapy_725 08/26/13 - 10:28 am
0
0
No failures under communism. Only mediocrity.
Unpublished

No failures under communism. Only mediocrity.

Riverman1
79223
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Riverman1 08/26/13 - 10:50 am
3
0
Have Paine's new football

Have Paine's new football team hurry up and go D-1 and play a couple of big schools every year and take in about a half million per game. That would help the school.

Riverman1
79223
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Riverman1 08/26/13 - 10:48 am
3
0
Last Year's Payouts to Small Schools

Oklahoma State vs. Savannah State (Week 1, 84-0): $385,000
Florida State vs. Murray State (Week 1, 69-3): $450,000
Pittsburgh vs. Youngstown State (Week 1, 31-17 – UPSET!): 400,000
Florida State vs. Savannah State (Week 2): $475,000
Oklahoma vs. Florida A&M (Week 2): $650,000
Alabama vs. Western Kentucky (Week 2): $1,000,000
Arkansas vs. Louisiana-Monroe (Week 2): $500,000 – part of $3,000,000, six-game deal
Virginia Tech vs. Austin Peay (Week 2): $318,750
Tennessee vs. Georgia State (Week 2): $500,000

Darby
23570
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Darby 08/26/13 - 03:53 pm
3
1
"Paine cannot be allowed to fail.

Its cultural and economic impact is too important to Augusta."

.
Words are cheap. Propping up a failed institution with tax dollars is not.

I don't care if it's UGA or Harvard, (I wish it were Harvard) all such institutions should be required to stand alone and on their own. If they are worth the cost, they will survive.

Unfortunately, that's not the world we have come to live in.

The well well WILL eventually run dry.

Darby
23570
Points
Darby 08/26/13 - 03:54 pm
2
1
"There is a need for historical black colleges

because some blacks come out of high school unprepared to succeed in college yet will bloom and become successful in life because of their time and experiences at a college like Paine."

Now that's just plain silly..

chascushman
6653
Points
chascushman 08/26/13 - 04:55 pm
2
1
"There is a need for
Unpublished

"There is a need for historical black colleges
because some blacks come out of high school unprepared to succeed in college"
There are a LOT of whites that "come out of high school unprepared to succeed in college". Do we need a special college for them?

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