Dire loves company

Public sector will find private sector friends on the other end of dire

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We have lots of empathy for local schools now going through yet more budget cutting.

Empathy. Not sympathy.

The fact is, the private sector in this country has already gone through this, time and time again.

Workers have been laid off over and over. Their benefits have been cut back, even as their workloads have increased. Their companies have struggled just to survive.

As for furloughs, which nobody enjoys implementing, in the private sector they’re called “pay cuts.” The difference: With a furlough, at least you get a day off!

Another difference between the public and private sectors is the amount you hear about the difficulties in each. Cutbacks at most businesses never make the news. Employees in the private sector aren’t as secure in their jobs, and therefore feel less free to bemoan their fates in public.

So when having to turn appliances and lights off more in area schools is considered “pain,” that’s where the empathy cuts off and the sympathy never takes hold.

It’s called being more efficient.

We don’t envy the Richmond County Board of Education and other top district officials having to cover for $19 million in state cuts, or the principals having to find 7 percent cuts at their schools. Real pain – not just more work and smarter planning – will be required.

We appreciate the teachers who will be covering for each other, in order to avoid hiring as many substitutes. We know teachers already have a lot on their plates. And we appreciate others in the district stepping it up and thinking outside the box.

Just know you’re not alone.

Businesses, especially the mom and pop ones, put their livelihoods on the line every day – those that have been able to weather the storms since the 2008 financial collapse, anyway. They can tell you what it’s like in the trenches when you’re in survival mode.

Such challenges can
discourage you or invigorate you. They can destroy you or make you stronger. Often it’s pure fate that determines that. Most often, however, it’s fortitude and attitude – both of which you are in charge of yourself.

We have the utmost confidence in our Board of Education and district Superintendent Dr. Frank Roberson to steer Richmond County schools through these dire financial straits. But nobody should expect to be exempt from having to run this obstacle course.

There are those on the other end who can assure you it’s navigable.

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Riverman1
86668
Points
Riverman1 06/08/13 - 01:58 am
7
1
Take The Fruit Out of School Jell-O

We’ve observed the painful cuts in private business and at the Chronicle. It’s no fun. The public sector always lags behind economic cycles until they start to believe they are exempt from the downturns. The truth is we all become more efficient and frugal when the economy goes south. Keep in mind it’s a natural and necessary response.

Rhetor
1020
Points
Rhetor 06/08/13 - 07:20 am
4
13
appalling

I don't know where to begin, as the conservatives' disdain for our nation's children seems to be unlimited. However, just to start: do you realize that newspaper readers need to, well, be able to read? And that cutbacks in education have the potential to destroy your market? I don't suppose that you guys thought of that, did you? Have a nice day. Be grateful that a teacher taught you to read.

Old Timmer
260
Points
Old Timmer 06/08/13 - 07:33 am
4
0
Kinda right!

I agree cuts must be made BUT your comments about "avoid hiring substitutes" proves that you know nothing about what goes on in the current day classroom.

soapy_725
43757
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soapy_725 06/08/13 - 08:07 am
1
0
Multitasking in school.....
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teacher, referee, policeman, jailer, government test giver, social worker, psychologist, linguist, legal aide, nurse, self defense expert, para-parent, punching bag......

There is so little time for the primary objective, teaching.

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 08:46 am
8
3
You are right, Rhetor.
Unpublished

You are right, Rhetor. Spending more money on education has, so far, done remarkably well in bettering the education of the children. (end sarcasm font)

So you say conservatives have disdain for children because they don't want to continue spending money we don't have? The liberals seem to show their great love of children by ensuring that each and every one of them has a debt that they can't possibly pay, therefore forcing them to have more children to pay it off. Interesting strategy. Personally I prefer financial responsibility.

And why is it the left so often tries to pull at the heartstrings of people by claiming something is "for the children?" Emotion v/s logic.

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 10:38 am
6
1
HA, this one is for you.

"You are right, Rhetor. Spending more money on education has, so far, done remarkably well in bettering the education of the children. (end sarcasm font)"

I have to agree with HA on this one. Liberals believe that "pushing money" at every problem is the "magic" answer ! However, if both sides agree that there is an on-going problem with public education, we need to try and fix the problem ! Personally, I truly believe that the problem is an almost complete lack of discipline ! NOW, we have to come up with a "politically correct" way of discipline.

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 10:52 am
5
0
GOOD IDEA for another editorial:

It probably would help tremindously if editorial writers on both sides of the Savannha River would ask the states' governments, "Why mandate things like raises and better benefits, if the state is not going to pay for these ??!!"

rmwhitley
5547
Points
rmwhitley 06/08/13 - 10:57 am
0
0
There are
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teachers who are really good at their jobs and there are teachers who shouldn't even drive a school bus. The job security issue needs to be addressed. Atlanta Public Schools, Clayton County Schools, DeKalb County Schools and more yet to be exposed are examples of failure to dismiss "teachers" not cut out for the job. When being a guvmint employee is no longer a safe haven for the lazy and slackers, you will finally find those who really care about what they are doing and then start saving OUR money.

Darby
26830
Points
Darby 06/08/13 - 11:01 am
5
2
"We have the utmost confidence in our Board

of Education and district Superintendent Dr. Frank Roberson to steer Richmond County schools through these dire financial straits."

.
Really???? They've done such a marvelous job so far haven't they?

And thanks, Rhetor for those totally predictable remarks. Money (even when there is none) is always the first and only solution to emanate from the liberal mindset.

It's odd how private schools across the nation produce a better product with less money time and time again. Could motivation be a factor?

Teachers serve a purpose, but only IF they are true to that purpose. My grandkids were NOT taught to read by a government employee. Although they graduated from public school, (Davidson) they learned reading, science, math, etc., by home schooling. (Again, motivation.)

There's nothing wrong with the idea of public school except the lockstep view that it's our educational salvation rather than just one alternative. Another form of the "diversity" that liberals both love and hate.

Our school system, especially when it fails us, cannot be a "sacred cow" in troubled financial times. If it is, we will never make of it what we need to, because there will never be the motivation to do better.

Bizkit
32828
Points
Bizkit 06/08/13 - 11:07 am
5
2
Progressives always want to

Progressives always want to spend, spend, spend-even when it doesn't actually do anything. America spends more on education (and healthcare) than any nation on the planet-yet third world countries can educate their children better than we with a fraction of the costs. Money really isn't the problem with our education system-although I've always argued teachers make too little. Govt subsidies allows states to fluff up everything so when the govt cuts then the state is left stranded with more than it can support. The research sector grew in the 80s with Clinton's dramatic increases yet it wasn't sustainable which now has created a bottleneck of lots of researchers competing for a smaller pie. It's a lesson we should learn-don't let govt drive things because they always fail. A lot of our national debt is from the Social Security Trust fund-which was a trust the govt shouldn't touch but they did-so we can't "trust" the govt to do things correctly. Events of late further support that with the Obama administration.

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 11:11 am
7
0
Is there ANYBODY that doesn't think discipline ?

It is too often that the few brats that WILL NOT behave, hender the rest of the students and teacher from doing good work !!

Bizkit
32828
Points
Bizkit 06/08/13 - 11:11 am
5
0
Yeah, did ya'll read about

Yeah, did ya'll read about the catholic schools providing superior educated students at an unbelievably low costs. Part of the problem isn't in the school but in our children-a cultural problem. American born ethnic groups often do poorly in our school system, yet these same ethnic groups immigrate here from Africa, Venezuela, etc. and they usually are stellar students. What's the difference-culture.

dahreese
4743
Points
dahreese 06/08/13 - 11:31 am
1
6
"Money (even when there is
Unpublished

"Money (even when there is none) is always the first and only solution to emanate from the liberal mindset."

"And why is it the left so often tries to pull at the heartstrings of people by claiming something is "for the children?" Emotion v/s logic."

Perhaps those of you with the "right-wing mindset" who agree with this gruel should go into the classroom and explain "for the children" how the cutbacks are going to be beneficial to them; less classroom paper, less field trips, less extra curricula activities, second rate technology because you kids aren't worth first rate technology and a first rate education, the benefits of larger classes and less personal attention when you need help with a problem, waiting until 'real cold' weather occurs before raising the thermostat to keep you warm or waiting until 'real heat' before using the a/c, less toilet paper and handtowels in the restrooms, less school busses and fewer routes and you'll need to walk a few more blocks to catch your school bus, less audio-visual equipment, less library materials, no updated text books.

"It's odd how private schools across the nation produce a better product with less money time and time again."

This is patently false. Research has shown that on the whole private and charter schools are not producing a better product than public schools.

(And, no, HA, I'm not going to "prove it!")

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 11:42 am
3
1
dahreese @ 11:31

"(And, no, HA, I'm not going to "prove it!")"

I usually DON'T agree with HA, but can't you at least see the point about more money equaling better education ?!

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 12:31 pm
7
3
Nice...preemptively refusing
Unpublished

Nice...preemptively refusing to back up baseless and false statements. Gotta love those liberals.

Maybe YOU, dahreese, can explain how spending until you collapse the economy like Greece is good for the children, because you liberals are so addicted to spending money that they don't have.

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 12:43 pm
5
3
I believe the real reason
Unpublished

I believe the real reason dahreese refuses to prove that the statement was "patently false" is because this and many other studies show that the statement actually is true. But never let facts (verifiable facts, not just made up ones) get in the way of a debate.

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/news/local-education/private-schools...

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 01:00 pm
4
3
I would have no problem
Unpublished

I would have no problem explaining how cutbacks are good for the children.

Children...we are going to have to use the computers we have for a few more years. You will have to bring your own pencils and paper to school. The buses might have to make 2 trips like they used to. You may have to wear your jacket in class because the temperature is a little cooler than you like. BUT as a result of cutting back, the country will still be free and prosperous when you graduate. You won't have to go on food stamps because you will be able to find a job (if there's money for food stamps), and you won't have to worry about a national debt that even your grandchildren can't pay off. You are going to have to get the superior education that your parents and grandparents got before the USDE decided to intervene and spend more money than we have, and produce less quality. It will all be worth it.

That wasn't so hard, now was it? Or would you rather just try to convince them that we can have anything we want in schools regardless of what the cost is. I certainly hope you and people like you aren't teaching economics in any of these schools.

rmwhitley
5547
Points
rmwhitley 06/08/13 - 01:03 pm
0
0
I can remember
Unpublished

when Thomas Edison and Albert Einstein complained about no fed. money, no field trips, no "extra curricla" activities, no first-rate technology, classrooms too cold, blah blah blah blah blah. They suffered through some pretty stormy weather, lousy teaching ( without unions), financial crisis after crisis to become something very few, if any, aspire to become today. We have dumbed down education because minorities want EVERYTHING handed to them on a gold platter. I'm surprised that some of you libbies can even get your sorry derrieres off of the bed each morning without some form of gubmint aid.

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 01:08 pm
4
2
HA, very well put !

"Children...we are going to have to use the computers we have for a few more years. You will have to bring your own pencils and paper to school. The buses might have to make 2 trips like they used to. You may have to wear your jacket in class because the temperature is a little cooler than you like. BUT as a result of cutting back, the country will still be free and prosperous when you graduate. You won't have to go on food stamps because you will be able to find a job (if there's money for food stamps), and you won't have to worry about a national debt that even your grandchildren can't pay off. You are going to have to get the superior education that your parents and grandparents got before the USDE decided to intervene and spend more money than we have, and produce less quality. It will all be worth it."

HA, how about expounding on the discipline angle.

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 01:11 pm
6
2
There was a time when most
Unpublished

There was a time when most students feared "acting up" in class. Today there is zero repercussion from such behavior. I agree Mr Bledsoe. We badly need discipline in school. A nun with a ruler can almost work miracles.

Mark your calendar. We agree on most everything today! LOL

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 01:16 pm
3
1
HA, you have really nailed this editorial today !

"Mark your calendar. We agree on most everything today! LOL"

It was bound to happen someday !!

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 01:21 pm
4
0
Speaking of discipline...

The question still begs an answer, "What kind of discipline would / could all parents agree to ??!!"

itsanotherday1
45229
Points
itsanotherday1 06/08/13 - 02:29 pm
7
0
Mr. Bledsoe, I believe you

Mr. Bledsoe, I believe you are whistling into the wind inre discipline. Too many parents don't discipline at home, and more yet won't allow discipline at school. Talk to any teacher.

dahreese
4743
Points
dahreese 06/08/13 - 02:39 pm
2
4
Here are two sources not
Unpublished

Here are two sources not written by pro/con advocates (as is the source provided by HA).

As to either of you actually going into a classroom and giving your little speech, unless its elementary school, the middle/junior/high school kids know better and would laugh you out of their classes.

http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Ed_Private_vs_Schools/

www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1670063,00.html‎
--------------------------------------------
Rregarding the discipline question, I'd be very interested in just how you would handle discipline...?

Darby
26830
Points
Darby 06/08/13 - 02:48 pm
4
2
With regard to teacher pay. IF they

are doing the job they were hired to do in the public sector, then teachers today are UNDERPAID.

In my not so humble opinion, that means that about 20 to 25 percent of the teachers in Richmond Count are not paid enough.

On the other hand, that means that 75 to 80 percent of our teachers are grossly OVERPAID.

Doubt that? Look at our national standings. Worse yet, compare the American states with the higher achievement to the rest of the world to see that money spent per child is NOT a solution, just a political diversion.

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 02:52 pm
4
3
dahreese, I'm glad to see you
Unpublished

dahreese, I'm glad to see you are at least trying, but the fact remains that your statement that "It's odd how private schools across the nation produce a better product with less money time and time again." is patently false was proven to be a lie already. I showed evidence backing it up, therefore proving that it is NOT patently false. No one is saying it is true in every case. But thanks for at least trying to back up what you say. The effort is appreciated. And since you seem to be in the mood, try backing this statement up with some factual evidence....starting with what is inaccurate with what I said.
"As to either of you actually going into a classroom and giving your little speech, unless its elementary school, the middle/junior/high school kids know better and would laugh you out of their classes."

Explain how or why they would "know better." Especially since nothing I said was untrue.

Darby
26830
Points
Darby 06/08/13 - 02:52 pm
4
2
Although discipline is needed, a motivated

teacher can impart knowledge to the most recalcitrant student.

A "teacher" who is just putting in the hours while waiting for payday is an impediment to a child's education.

We have far too many of the latter and far too few of the former.

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 02:55 pm
4
3
More evidence showing the statement is NOT "patently false."
Unpublished

http://www.mdjonline.com/view/full_story/15541614/article-Private-school...

Feel free to attack the source again instead of any of the evidence in the study.

t3bledsoe
14291
Points
t3bledsoe 06/08/13 - 02:55 pm
6
0
Seeking a "politically correct" punishment.

"Rregarding the discipline question, I'd be very interested in just how you would handle discipline...?"

If the majority of parents and faculty AGREE that discipline is a major factor, then I believe there should be more stern punishment than is allowed currently.

Humble Angela
41338
Points
Humble Angela 06/08/13 - 02:58 pm
3
3
Discipline....a few
Unpublished

Discipline....a few examples.

How about janitorial duties after school? After school detention? It is obvious that moving them to a different school, full of thugs like themselves isn't working.

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