Traditional values underfoot

When will Christianity-bashing stop?

“Florida Atlantic University respects all religions and welcomes people of all faiths, backgrounds and beliefs.”

 

Isn’t it amazing an institution of higher learning today has to say such a thing?

And isn’t it all the more amazing that the statement had to be issued to comfort Christians – who represent by far the majority religion in America?

Yet, Florida Atlantic University did have to say it, after an instructor at FAU-Davie told students to write “Jesus” on a piece of paper and stomp on it. News reports indicated one student, Ryan Rotela, was suspended after he refused.

The school denied that, but apologized and said the exercise – allegedly used to point out both the arbitrariness and the power of symbols – wouldn’t ever be used again.

While the school says there was never any disciplinary action against Rotela, for some reason he felt it necessary to be protected by the conservative Liberty Institute.

Regardless, we rather doubt such a lesson plan would have included stomping on the name of Muhammad. Why is it OK to do it with Jesus’ name?

Here’s why: It’s because it’s fashionable in some circles to bash Christians. And because Christians don’t pick up knives and torches and call for someone’s death; instead, they pick up the phone.

In some cases, that’s enough, however. No doubt many did pick up a phone and call FAU in protest, and that it helped FAU make an about face and apologize for the incident, after initially defending it.

Why does it take even a civilized backlash to get some people to do the right thing? Why is it that they think bashing Christianity is OK?

When will it stop?

The outrage is reminiscent of a South Carolina teacher’s stomping on an American flag – again, a convenient target but a most regrettable one. The incident exploded nationwide, angering veterans and other patriots and leading to the teacher’s firing. He appealed his termination.

It’s interesting that the symbols that get stomped are always those of traditional American values. Why is that?

And if these educators know so much about the power of symbols, how do they keep having them blow up in their faces?

More