Don't breed suffering

Puppy mills rank among the worst types of manufactured misery

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It’s difficult to find the words to adequately describe the disgust we should all feel when animals are poorly taken care of, neglected or abused.

When it’s done on a mass scale, there simply are no words.

One such alleged instance is a reported “puppy mill” in Johnston, S.C., where authorities last month removed some 200 dogs, nine horses and 40 birds that were living in conditions that officials called “deplorable.” Dogs were living, and getting stuck and injured, in hutches lined with mesh, and officials say the smell of urine and feces was overwhelming. Injured and suffering animals were seen by vets and dispersed to various shelters.

The owner has been arrested and charged, and stands innocent before the eyes of the law. We’ll let the case work its way through the system.

But we can say that, in other cases of puppy mills, the profit motive seems to strip some people of their basic humanity.

The term “puppy mill” itself doesn’t quite cut it. We ought to call them “misery ranches,” for that’s what they really produce.

All of creation is a gift from God, but domesticated animals come with a special bow on them. They arrive at our feet as furry little packages of unconditional, undying love – the best sorts of companions you can dream of.

As happily incurable “dog people,” we’ll address that species specifically: Dogs are not only a reminder of God’s love, but a lesson for us all on how best to approach life and love. They live completely in the moment. They are unquestioning in their love and loyalty. They are unfailingly happy to see you – and 10 minutes away is rewarded with as much excitement as 10 days. They never ask for more than they truly need – well, maybe an extra walk or hug or treat – and they don’t need much. Just food, water, varying degrees of shelter and enough love to keep their reliable little hearts happy.

Those of us who get all that may be a special breed ourselves. And for anyone to cynically prey upon our love for animals in order to make a buck is reprehensible.

To do so while at the same time neglecting and making animals suffer needlessly, particularly en masse, is – well, again, the words aren’t there. We checked.

If you don’t recognize that animals can suffer, and can do so at your hands; if you aren’t organizationally or emotionally capable of properly caring for other sentient beings; if you’re just in it for the money – then please: run, don’t walk, from any temptation to raise animals.

There’s too much suffering in this world for you to be breeding more of it.

Comments (5) Add comment
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soapy_725
43676
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soapy_725 10/01/12 - 07:08 am
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Disturbed animal loving people, disturbed writer.
Unpublished

Would that there was as much concern about the "baby mills" that produce unwanted, neglected and abused human babies. These are the ones that survive the butchers knife or the suction machine.

Priorities seem to be confused. But irresponsible humans are to blame in both instances. We live in a sick society.

Jane18
12332
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Jane18 10/01/12 - 07:47 am
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Animal Abuse

Some people have no shame, seenit! They either got lost in making money and then the money slowed down or stopped coming in from sales and they lost interest in what they were doing. If you notice, most of these people do not have a conscience, Or they would feel bad for the animals(not themselves).

JRC2024
8548
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JRC2024 10/01/12 - 08:33 am
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I love my dogs as much as

I love my dogs as much as anything I have. They are good for the soul, bring happiness when I come home , are wonderful companions and those loving eyes and wagging tails make me feel good. There should be some harsh punishment for people who run those kind of places.

JRC2024
8548
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JRC2024 10/01/12 - 08:33 am
1
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I love my dogs as much as

I love my dogs as much as anything I have. They are good for the soul, bring happiness when I come home , are wonderful companions and those loving eyes and wagging tails make me feel good. There should be some harsh punishment for people who run those kind of places.

seenitB4
85720
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seenitB4 10/01/12 - 09:50 am
2
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too bad

My post must have hit the mark!!

etbmfa
42
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etbmfa 10/01/12 - 04:42 pm
1
1
7 Things You Didn’t Know About Puppy Mills

Really, you want people to know you are against “puppy mills”? Gosh, where do you stand on murderers, pedophiles and rapists? For, or against?
The rabid AR rhetoric against so-called “puppy mills” is absurd. The term itself is a pejorative intended to slur ALL dog breeding. It’s as offensive a term as any racial or ethnic slur you can come up with, so PLEASE do us all a favor and quit the mindless yammering about “puppy mills.”
7 Things You Didn’t Know About Puppy Mills
1) The phrase “puppy mill” has been promoted in the media by the animal rights movement, people who want to end all animal ownership. It is applied indiscriminately by these fanatics to anyone who breeds dogs.
2) There are just two types of breeders: those who are humane and those who aren’t. Current laws prohibit inhumane, abusive and neglectful treatment of dogs. So-called “puppy mill bills” target according to number of dogs owned; however, what is important is the standard of care, not the numbers.
3) Most commercial breeders have state of the art kennels. They need to meet stringent USDA standards and the standards of their state laws.
4)”Sick” puppies do not sell. It is counterproductive for any industry to produce a defective product and expect to stay in business.
5) Passing laws to outlaw “puppy mills” will not solve anything. Inhumane breeders are already in violation of existing laws. New, stricter laws will only affect those breeders who are dedicated and caring. We need to enforce cruelty laws that are already on the books.
6) All the breeders in this country cannot produce enough puppies to meet the demands of the American market. Currently, hundreds of thousands of dogs and puppies are imported from other countries to meet the demand.
7) Breeders are not responsible for the presence of dogs in shelters. We have a problem with responsible ownership. Education is the key to improvement in this area.
For more information:
http://www.cfodconline.org/
http://www.petpac.net/
http://www.exposeanimalrights.com/
www.naiaonline.org
www.humanewatch.org
www.saveourdogs.net
www.nathanwinograd.com
www.saova.org

GaStang22
910
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GaStang22 10/01/12 - 10:14 pm
1
1
Sick!!
Unpublished

Did you guys also see that despite this woman and her family doing this for decades her only penalty was ....a measly $350?? Oh and a limit on the animals she can have....which didn't work the first time she was busted so it has to now right???? SICK SICK SICK!!!!!!

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