How low?

Lower than a dog can dig, you'll find someone who'll shoot it

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Check under a rock.

There, you will find all kinds of creepy, crawly bugs.

Beneath them, you’ll find the kind of people who break into your home to just take what you’ve worked hard to buy.

Beneath them, you’ll find the kind of people who take a gun with them when they break into your home to just take what you’ve worked hard to buy.

Beneath them, you’ll find the kind of people who will shoot your dog when they break into your home to just take what you’ve worked hard to buy.

Beneath them you’ll find the kind of people who will shoot an injured veteran’s service dog when they break into her home to just take what she and her husband have worked hard to buy.

Yep. It’s about as low as you can go without hitting shale.

This is what befell Augusta’s Kinga Kiss-Johnson, an Army veteran enduring a slow and painful recovery from head and back injuries suffered while serving this country in Afghanistan.

While she was away from home for a short time the evening of May 7, Kiss-Johnson’s English Labrador retriever, Balto, was shot and wounded by a burglar. After a search, authorities arrested Joshua Kelly Patterson, 31, in the 1900 block of Wylds Road. He was charged with burglary, aggravated cruelty to animals, theft and misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

Kiss-Johnson had left Balto at home during an errand to get some dog food because he was still tired from a plane trip to The Warrior Games in Colorado Springs, Colo.

It was the third break-in at the home in the past year, the second inside of a week.

It’s bad enough that someone would break into a home and shoot a dog. But burglars and thieves have it in their capacity to make life in a city unbearable. Three break-ins in one year?

Unfortunately, the state of Georgia this year decided to go easier on all but the worst burglars. What we really need is to make life unbearable for them for a change. We need to do everything in our power to stop this scourge – particularly those burglars who are armed and at the ready to shoot the first thing that moves in a house.

The punishment cannot possibly fit the crime in some cases.

Comments (21) Add comment
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owensjef3
5639
Points
owensjef3 05/18/12 - 01:04 am
4
1
I agree
Unpublished

For the first time I'm in agreement.

HighSociety
1840
Points
HighSociety 05/18/12 - 03:41 am
4
2
Getting easier? We're at a

Getting easier? We're at a time now were we need to become harder. The state needs to stop giving money away, and start funding more prisons.

seenitB4
93730
Points
seenitB4 05/18/12 - 05:19 am
2
0
Crime is alive & well in parts of the county

It was the third break-in at the home in the past year, the second inside of a week.

Now tell me what is wrong with this picture???

Mtz & Evans ...it is coming soon .....just like this....

seenitB4
93730
Points
seenitB4 05/18/12 - 05:24 am
2
0
Away from it??

Some "think" that this doesn't happen near me....why worry.....you can't get far enough away....it will happen......what happens 3 miles or a few miles from you will be in your neck of the woods soon...

Put some input in crime in Richmond county B4 it over runs your county too.....2 teens were just robbed in Col. county just walking to a nearby store......

DuhJudge
206
Points
DuhJudge 05/18/12 - 05:49 am
4
1
The hand basket reached hell

The hand basket reached hell some time ago. Keep your eyes open and your gun near.

JohnBrownAug
1962
Points
JohnBrownAug 05/18/12 - 06:15 am
2
0
Out of Money for Prisons

We don't have enough money for more prisons, but we can arm ourselves, put up our own security systems and drastically change the criminal mindset as to breaking into houses.

I've lived in foreign countries where the residents went to great lengths to make their homes secure without depending on the overwhelmed police. It worked, too. The bad guys knew not to go near certain neighborhoods.

harley_52
25117
Points
harley_52 05/18/12 - 07:49 am
5
1
Perhaps we should attempt to

Perhaps we should attempt to find the root cause of Mr. Joshua Kelly Patterson's issues. He may have had an unhappy childhood. Perhaps his father was mean to him. Maybe his mother chose not to breast feed him and maybe he had a teacher who injured his self-esteem. Maybe he was forced to keep score in soccer games at too early an age, and maybe his teachers expected precision in math problems rather than just accepting "close enough" answers.

Is it really Mr. Joshua Kelly Patterson's fault, or is it OUR fault? Should he be punished, or should he be embraced by society and shown a little love and understanding for the pains he's suffered?

faithson
5449
Points
faithson 05/18/12 - 10:05 am
1
2
Funding of Social Scientists

Funding of Social Scientists is a must. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, the irony is that being science many on these boards would find the 'prescription' deemed necessary to deal with the problem rubbing up against their 'religious' ideology. Science deals with facts on the ground and does not allow the 'prejudice' of theology to hold sway when proscriptions for 'treatment' are advised.

harley_52
25117
Points
harley_52 05/18/12 - 10:43 am
3
1
My 8:49 post was, in case you

My 8:49 post was, in case you couldn't tell, made completely tongue in cheek. I was actually looking for the normal crew of left wingers to join me in springing to the defense of the indefensible and suggest this repulsive individual should be excused for what he did. That what he did wasn't HIS fault at all, but rather OUR fault. Actually, nothing could be further from my true position.

Shooting a Service Dog belonging to a wounded war veteran so you can steal her belongings is almost as low as it gets. It's almost as low as abusing and torturing a helpless child or any other helpless human being under any circumstances outside war and law enforcement (which should be viewed on a case by case situation. I have absolutely no patience or compassion for anyone who would do either of those things and I am a firm believer that society's only mistake in dealing with people like that is that we've become too soft, coddling, and unwilling to mete out punishment as it is really deserved.

We have so many criminals these days largely because they lacked discipline growing up and have no fear for either our justice or our penal systems.

burninater
9799
Points
burninater 05/18/12 - 10:54 am
1
1
How is trying to discover if

How is trying to discover if something may or may not have a preventable cause the same thing as excusing it? That simply makes no sense.

faithson
5449
Points
faithson 05/18/12 - 11:28 am
0
1
the essential question is

the essential question is whether these deviant behaviors are preventable and at what stage in development intervention can be useful, pre-birth being a case in point for some. No excuse intended for the present crop of criminals, just looking at ways to make it better as we progress.

harley_52
25117
Points
harley_52 05/18/12 - 11:28 am
3
0
Here's how I see it,

Here's how I see it, burninater. Maybe you see it differently. Your prerogative....

Finding out if some crime "has a preventable cause" may be a worthwhile exercise for some, but crime and criminals have been around for a very long time and lots of smart people have come up with all sorts of theories (and excuses) and have made lots of money writing books about it. Some (including me) consider it largely a waste of time and money and counterproductive to the goals of preventing crime.

The most effective way I can think of to prevent crime is to establish a security system to make it difficult for the potential criminals, but after apprehension and a finding of "guilty" by a duly established court, to punish the perpetrator to such an extent that he/she learns an unforgettable lesson, and that they (and others) are discouraged from committing such crimes in the future.

harley_52
25117
Points
harley_52 05/18/12 - 11:33 am
5
0
If you seek to discover

If you seek to discover "preventable causes" look no further than single parent families, fatherless homes, parents who don't believe in (or don't take the time to) discipline their children, and a society which coddles and forgives those who do bad things.

Start with the homes, then go to the schools. Root out all those who stand in the way of training children what's right and wrong.

Society will be the better for it.

burninater
9799
Points
burninater 05/18/12 - 11:46 am
1
1
Harley, it may be the case

Harley, it may be the case that some social scientists have not developed useful hypotheses for preventable causes of crime, but the hypotheses of your 12:33 post face the same difficulty. All of those factors you list, which have certainly increased since the early 90's, have been accompanied by a steady DECREASE in both violent AND property crime rates.

This is the value of evidence-based investigation. We all have ideas about what seems sensible to our own worldview, but that doesn't necessarily mean that those ideas are necessarily true.

harley_52
25117
Points
harley_52 05/18/12 - 12:12 pm
3
0
burninater said: "All of

burninater said: "All of those factors you list, which have certainly increased since the early 90's, have been accompanied by a steady DECREASE in both violent AND property crime rates."

I don't believe that's true. Where did you get your statistics? Are you certain of their validity? Are they counting crimes using the same criteria as in the early nineties? Are the reporting agencies actually reporting accurate data, or are they massaging it to make themselves look good?

Then he said "This is the value of evidence-based investigation. We all have ideas about what seems sensible to our own worldview, but that doesn't necessarily mean that those ideas are necessarily true."

If you're trying to tell me the information you claim you found through your "evidence-based investigation" is "necessarily true" I've got a bridge I'd like to sell you.

I've been around for a long time, burninater, certainly long enough not to believe everything I can find on the internet and certainly long enough to convince me that crime isn't decreasing.

burninater
9799
Points
burninater 05/18/12 - 12:13 pm
0
1
I should have completed my

I should have completed my thought, sorry:

... And by looking at the evidentiary bases of what are and are NOT pertinent factors, we can avoid, exactly as you caution, wasting precious time and resources trying to address factors that are not actually pertinent. Based on crime rate evidence, as much as declining traditional family values SEEM like a primary cause of crime, the evidently are not. Therefore, expending abundant political and financial capital on promoting values as a crime-deterrent is wasting resources. There's nothing wrong with doing so to defend a personal aesthetic idea of what families should look like, but in the specific case of decreasing crime rates, we shouldn't be fooling ourselves that resources promoting traditional family values are resources well-spent.

burninater
9799
Points
burninater 05/18/12 - 12:16 pm
0
0
Harley, the crime rate

Harley, the crime rate statistics I cite are FBI rates over time. I know you are quite particular about information pedigree -- I think we would both be hard-pressed to find a more accurate data collector of American crime rates over time.

burninater
9799
Points
burninater 05/18/12 - 12:19 pm
1
0
And I have no interest in

And I have no interest in trying to convince anyone of anything -- we all need to make our own decisions about how we view evidence, whether we choose to interact with reality based on what is real, or based on what we imagine to be real.

Cheers.

faithson
5449
Points
faithson 05/18/12 - 01:59 pm
0
0
Actually, their are

Actually, their are creditable studies on the decrease in violent crime (FBI Stats) that attribute this decrease to women's access to family planning services during the 80's and 90's. Less deviants, less deviant behavior. It is noted in these studies that 'incarceration' is a part of the answer, but not the end all be all some think.

faithson
5449
Points
faithson 05/18/12 - 02:09 pm
0
0
Crime statistics for the

Crime statistics for the United States are published annually by the Federal Bureau of Investigation

In 2009 America's crime rate was roughly the same as in 1968, with the homicide rate being at its lowest level since 1964.

The year 2010 was overall the safest year in almost forty years. The recent overall decrease has reflected upon all significant types of crime, with all violent and property crimes having decreased and reached an all-time low.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_the_United_States

Check out the 'reality' of our times...

harley_52
25117
Points
harley_52 05/18/12 - 03:45 pm
3
0
I trust zero information

I trust zero information emanating from the Obama Administration. That includes the Justice Department. I'm very skeptical of information from the FBI. I have absolutely no doubt that federal agencies run by Eric Holder and other Obama cronies are doing whatever they think will help in his re-election bid, not the least of which is doing whatever needs to be done to present a rosy picture of all Obama's accomplished during his first term.

Anybody who is willing to accept information provided by the Obama Administration does so at their own peril. As for me, I'll take all prudent measures necessary to protect myself and my family.

Burninater chooses to believe there is less crime today than there was ten, or twenty years ago. I don't believe that's true. He doesn't believe broken familes, families without fathers, the lack of discipline at home and in schools have increased crime. One can surmise that he thinks they helped bring down the crime statistics since he admits all have those factors has increased over the years.

I believe there is more crime, not less, regardless the statistics presented by the Administration. If there is any reduction in certain types of crime that's NOT due to reporting errors, I would attribute it to more and more citizens choosing to arm themselves and thereby making it a little more dangerous for criminals to attack potential victims.

faithson
5449
Points
faithson 05/18/12 - 04:26 pm
0
2
Prejudice

They have become so narrowed by tradition that they are blinded by prejudice and hardened by fear. UB quote

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