His ultimate victory

Dred Scott receives deserved honor as pioneer in fight for racial equality

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Dred Scott got by luck what he tried to get by lawsuit:

His freedom.

The Missouri slave, whose name is immortalized by that infamous court case we all heard about in school, was ultimately set free by his owner’s conversion to abolitionist views, mere months after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against Scott in 1857.

It’s interesting that Scott’s legal argument rested on what amounts to a technicality: that he and his family had, at various times, lived in states and territories where slavery was outlawed. If he had won, he would’ve secured freedom only for his family, and perhaps a few others. But in losing the case, Scott became a symbol for a better argument encompassing many more souls: that slavery was immoral and unconstitutional.

While the court ruled against him, the case became an anti-slavery rallying cry and a flashpoint for the Civil War, and has since become synonymous with racism and horrendous legal decisions. The prison walls of Scott v. Sandford, which ruled blacks non-citizens, and later Plessy v. Ferguson, which approved segregation, were never fully taken down until the Brown v. Board of Education decisions of 1954 and 1955, and the subsequent Civil Rights Act.

But if we recognize the Dred Scott name, what do we know of him? And how many people on the street can give you an intelligent answer about who he was?

So many decades later, Dred Scott was honored Wednesday with a bronze bust that will be displayed on the Missouri capitol’s third floor.

It’s about time.

His case was one of the links in the chain of this country’s awful institution of slavery. But more than that, Dred Scott fought for his freedom with the ultimate peace and civility, by relying on the courts. The legal system of the time let him down, but inadvertently raised him up for all ages to remember.

The ultimate victory was his.

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Retired Army
17513
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Retired Army 05/14/12 - 12:10 am
4
4
1957 eh?

ACES writes: "mere months after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against Scott in 1957."

Just about right for this editorial staff's mode of thinking. Around 100 years too late for everything. Oh, you funny guys. :0 :)

Gawidah! I just hope this booboo doesn't escape into the print edition. Folks around America already think little of this towns editorial staff. How much would it cost to recall and reprint Monday's edition anyway?

You fix the date and I'll agree with you on the sentiment. Peace(as soon as I stop laughing that is)

FriedFacts
61
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FriedFacts 05/14/12 - 04:55 am
0
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Typo Represents the Reality
Unpublished

The editorial may be a hundred years off, but nothing actually changed for blacks until another hundred years. They still remained as second class citizens in an apartheid system for another century. The typo with the date is like a Freudian slip where the real meaning comes out.

Bizkit
35379
Points
Bizkit 05/14/12 - 06:27 am
3
3
It's called illusory

It's called illusory superiority.

Retired Army
17513
Points
Retired Army 05/14/12 - 08:07 am
3
2
Yeah, I feel your pain turtle

Yeah, I feel your pain turtle and bizkit. I have those same "feelings" when I, or one of my heros, flub too.

Why I had to admit to a mistake(that I was called on)on the boards just the other day. Them be some sour grapes indeed. I wonder what poor working stiff in the pressroom is taking the fall for this one.

Retired Army
17513
Points
Retired Army 05/14/12 - 08:09 am
3
2
Well, it looks as if the

Well, it looks as if the Chronicle comes to work at around 9:00 AM.

Granddaddy John
101
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Granddaddy John 05/14/12 - 12:29 pm
0
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The Civil War wasn't fought
Unpublished

The Civil War wasn't fought over slavery,research a liitle history Please.

Bizkit
35379
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Bizkit 05/14/12 - 08:18 pm
0
0
I overlook typos because

I overlook typos because apparently humans seem incapable of publishing many documents without errors. I haven't read any college text book (you'd think they would be perfect given the costs) that didn't have mistakes-some are hilarious. I think a recent study examined PhD disserations and found a majority had spelling errors, grammar errors and even plariarism. I remember the ole days of typing, making errors, and then start the whole page over-no Whiteout yet. I believe there were fewer errors in the ole days because people were more attentive because of the labor intensity. Nowadays just pull it off your jump drive, correct it, and republish it. No more hours of art in the darkroom printing images because you can use AdobePhotoshop and do anything with a digital image. Now if you publish in journals everything is electronic submissions. Poor snail mail doesn't have a chance does it but watch the govt bail it out for posterity-because its a cultural resource.

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