The mourning after

Neglected moral values spawn culture of violence

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Friends were mourning rapper Slim Dunkin this week, shot to death at a video shoot at an Atlanta studio.

In Augusta, friends and family were mourning 19-year-old Webster Thacker this week, after he was shot and killed Dec. 14 in the 2500 block of Drayton Drive.

“Forty-nine alleged gang members have been arrested in Gwinnett County,” writes the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, “in connection with violent crimes surrounding an apartment complex, among them drug dealing, robberies of high school students and a murder.”

These stories are all unrelated but tied together by one single theme: the out-of-control violence in America’s cities.

Each time a young person is cut down in the prime of life, the question is always asked through teary eyes: Why? The answers are always unique to each situation, but, again, most often tied together by one single theme: the out-of-control violence in America’s cities.

The likely causes to this
crisis are unpleasant to consider, sometimes politically incorrect and impossible to overcome without everyone’s help. And a little honesty.

The causes involve a culture that glorifies “gangsters” and guns and machismo, treats women as chattel and children as non-entities, makes up the rules as it goes along, embraces drugs and pushes law enforcement away while leveling a threatening brow at anyone cooperating with police.

The causes involve a society in which church-going has decreased and church-goers have been increasingly mocked in the media, while two-parent families have largely become the exception – and that, too, is just fine with the media, which have canonized single mothers regardless of how they got that way.

Meanwhile, the media attack anyone speaking honestly about the situation. When presidential candidate Newt Gingrich suggested that child labor laws ought to be modified to allow kids to pitch in at school and maybe earn some cash and stow away some pride, he was carpet-bombed by the media. “Newt Gingrich hates poor children,” blared one headline.

What he actually said was that if kids wanted to work as, say, assistant janitors at their schools, they’d earn a little cash and have more pride in both their school and themselves – and “They’d begin the process of rising.

“Get any job that teaches you to show up on Monday.”

In standing by his remarks, Gingrich caused another firestorm by saying poor kids today have “no habits of working and nobody around them who works.”

Hate? Or truth? Hate? Or tough love? We may never know, since Gingrich’s ideas were summarily taken out back and shot.

You’re never going to solve small things, much less big problems, as long as you simply attack people for their ideas. At least Gingrich is trying to come up with something. What has Barack Obama proposed to help poor children find their way to the American dream and out of a culture of death?

If we’re afraid of ideas, how can we possibly hope to have the courage to stand up to armed thugs?

All those “whys” have answers, if we’re willing to face them. Peace doesn’t just happen. It is made to happen, by people of good will and solid constitutions.

Webster Thacker’s killing, unfortunately, did not come “out of the blue,” as one relative lamented. It was one sprig from a tree of murders, assaults and other crimes that are flowering in the rich soil of neglect and cowardice.

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Riverman1
93290
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Riverman1 12/22/11 - 04:52 am
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What do I have to do

What do I have to do proofread for you guys all the time? It’s gangstas not gangsters. But seriously besides welfare rules encouraging women to have illegitimate children being counterproductive, the most serious flaw in our system is the War on Drugs. These two problems are legislated and can be changed.

We need to drastically cut welfare that gives the mothers just enough money to stay on reservations like American Indians who get a couple of thousand dollars a month from the government for doing nothing and who have such a horrendous prevalence of alcoholism, drug use and unemployment.

The failure of the War on Drugs is obvious to all now. The drug usage has actually increased despite billions wasted. The judicial system is admitting defeat and starting various backdoor drug courts to decriminalize these crimes. Law enforcement agencies nationally and locally have been corrupted.

The major problem is the crime producing gangs that have come about to run the drug dealing. They are as prevalent and deadly as any during Prohibition were. When you have gangs breaking the law whether it's selling illegal liquor or drugs, they don't stop at breaking just those laws. That's what we learned from Prohibition.

When laws promote crime and the moral decay of society, change the laws.

seenitB4
96999
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seenitB4 12/22/11 - 07:13 am
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Ditto to what riverman just

Ditto to what riverman just said..

david jennings
624
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david jennings 12/22/11 - 08:15 am
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On riverman' comment, I have

On riverman' comment, I have to agree, the war on drugs is a failure. Irresponsible people will always be with us. Liquor is as dangerous as it gets,especially when used irresponsibly. Just because alchohol is legal does that mean I'm going out and buy a quart of liquor and drink it knowing I have a job to be at in the morning? No, it's being responsible. If I want to use drugs believe me, I can go out and get some with little problem before lunch, it being illegal doesn't matter to a user, they are already rolling the dice anyway putting their life in the hands of a street corner dealer, do we really think they won't take a chance getting caught? And if they do it's just a matter of a little inconvience, pay the probation fee, get out and go right back but be more careful this time. The taxpayers will pick up the tab for your court appointed lawyer and incarceration. Your wife and children will get welfare and food from the state. Ther has to be a better way.

burninater
9921
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burninater 12/22/11 - 09:19 am
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Off-topic but interesting

Off-topic but interesting little historical nuance on the Indian subsidy Riverman brought up -- the reason why Indians are on the dole is because of a neat little legal trick the U.S. govt did in the 1800's. See, the U.S. entered into numerous treaties with various tribes over the course of settlement. Legal disputes arose when those treaties were not honored. One made it to the Supreme Court, whose decision determined that tribes were actually domestic dependents, a "ward to his guardian", and therefore legally incapable of bringing suit in the cases of violated treaty obligations! Essentially, it would be like you or me trying to enforce a contract via civil suit and having the judge declare us incompetent and unable to enter into a legal contract in the first place.

The result is that by creating this legal status for tribes to avoid its treaty obligations, the U. S. is now a legal ward of tribal people.

"In Cherokee Nation v. Georgia (30 U.S. (5 Pet.) 1 (1831)), the Court addressed the question of whether the Cherokee Nation was a "foreign state" and, therefore, could sue the State of Georgia in federal court under diversity jurisdiction. Chief Justice Marshall ruled that federal courts had no jurisdiction over such a case because Indian tribes were merely "domestic dependent nations" existing "in a state of pupilage. Their relation to the United States resembles that of a ward to his guardian." "

http://www.americanbar.org/content/newsletter/publications/gp_solo_magaz...

Chillen
17
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Chillen 12/22/11 - 09:45 am
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It's a cultural problem.

It's a cultural problem. Until we have massive govt welfare reform and societal reform, the problem will continue. At the current time, I see no end in sight.

onlysane1left
223
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onlysane1left 12/22/11 - 12:13 pm
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Decent article today,

Decent article today, finally! I agree with the causes of city volence among youths. I must call out the NAACP, Boys and Girls Club, United Way and other organizations to find a way to work together and save you troubled youths. While Newt Gingrich is stingly truthful about the causes of why there is so much trouble in the low income neighborhoods, I strongly disagree with making them work at school. I understand the need to distill values and pride in children in "troubled" neighborhood, forcing them to work is a way to go, but not make this mandatory. I think programs after school, mentors, and better school atmosphere will help give them pride also, not just work.

Willow Bailey
20605
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Willow Bailey 12/22/11 - 12:42 pm
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Yes,to river, wrongs are not

Yes,to river, wrongs are not stagnant, they multiply, abound and pass down generationally.

Yes, to onlysane1, awareness PLUS purpose, upheld and modelled through RELATIONSHIPS (mentoring, parenting, teaching, living) will change our lives.

One addition, we have no sustainable power on our own. And "troubled neighborhoods", are not the only ones in "trouble".

burninater
9921
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burninater 12/22/11 - 12:47 pm
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Fred, I'm personally not

Fred, I'm personally not convinced it's a concerted effort of govt and MSM. I think MSM is appealing to its perceived audience -- conservative bias for the conservative audience, liberal bias for the liberal audience, while govt is a case-by-case instance of individuals or coalitions in positions of power, doing their best to carve out a bigger chunk of wealth or power at the expense of those lacking that position of power.

I think we get misdirected by certain talking heads to focus on these vast, invisible plots because then we aren't noticing -- or prosecuting -- the real, actual, individual instances of manipulation and abuse of power. It would be like a thug completely avoiding arrest by convincing the police they need to address the whole socioeconomic system rather than arresting them specifically for their crime -- but in the case of politicians and financial industry execs, people buy such nonsense and the crooks walk away, scott free.

allhans
24843
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allhans 12/22/11 - 12:50 pm
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0
Newt didn't say"make then

Newt didn't say"make then work", but give them the opportunity of earning some spending money. Boys did it not too many years ago, early morning paper routes, etc and giving them a job at the school would solve most transportation problems.
I think it would be a good thing, and I am NOT a fan of Newt..Just don't discount ideas because you don't like the person.

burninater
9921
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burninater 12/22/11 - 02:27 pm
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I agree with Rivermsn on drug

I agree with Rivermsn on drug laws. Currently, we have violent drug crime + addiction + costs of enforcement and incarceration. Decriminalize it, regulate it, and you're left with a likely moderate increase in addiction but a significant decrease in violent drug crime and enforcement and incarceration costs. I'd be willing to wager quite a bit that the costs of the increase in the former will be grossly overshadowed by the savings in the reductions of the latter two.

55 F-100
1
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55 F-100 12/22/11 - 03:04 pm
0
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The "war on drugs" isn't a

The "war on drugs" isn't a failure, the absence of sending the little hood-rat thugs to prison is the failure.
As far as welfare reform goes, stop paying for unwed mothers to have a career path of having babies that they can not afford. If the unwed mother cannot afford to pay the bills, then place the children up for adoption, and pay for the "mother" to have a hysterectomy....or.....make the "baby-daddy" pay the bills........problem solved.

FalseHopeLooseChange
5
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FalseHopeLooseChange 12/22/11 - 03:51 pm
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“Forty-nine alleged gang

“Forty-nine alleged gang members have been arrested in Gwinnett County,” ....

These unfortunate, misunderstood, and misguided youths should be eligible for parole about the time Magnolia Trace is up and running.
Maybe a kind, compassionate judge will parole them to Magnolia Trace, thinking a change of scenery will change their lives for the better.......

Ya Think?

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