We need to sort this out

Proposal to end mail processing here ought to be stamped out

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Normally, a delay at the Post Office isn’t such a good thing.

This one may be a godsend.

The U.S. Postal Service has plans to close some 3,700 local post offices and 252 mail-processing facilities – including Augusta’s processing facility, meaning local mail would be routed through Macon or Columbia, depending on your zip code.

That’s just crazy. Why would Georgia’s second-largest city be first in line for such a closure? And to think, a letter you send to your neighbor would be trucked down to Macon or over to Columbia, then sorted and sent back? How inefficient and silly is that?

Thankfully, the Postal Service has announced a five-month reprieve, until May 15, to give Congress (and the rest of us) time to consider alternatives.

There are many. Changing to five-day delivery is one. And there is a lot of fat in the civil service system that could be trimmed with a little courage.

Restructuring and, yes, closing some facilities will likely be necessary; mail volume, and revenue, has dropped over the years as more consumers use electronic bill payment and e-mails to communicate. As a result of this, and high legacy costs, the Postal Service is facing an estimated $14 billion in fiscal 2012.

But we need to make sure the reorganization is done wisely, with efficiency front and center – and not the meat-cleaver methods so often employed in political decision-making. In addition, if the changes only add to delivery time – as they surely will – then that will likely further erode the public’s reliance on what they call “snail mail.” The danger is that a spiral downward becomes a nosedive.

People who rely on such things as government checks would no doubt be hit hardest.

A public hearing on the proposed closing is still scheduled for tonight at 6 o’clock at the Kroc Center, 1833 Broad St. We still need to show up and voice our concerns. While the reprieve has been granted, the mail processing center still sits on death row.

Tell them to take their proposal and mark “Return to Sender” on it.

Comments (46) Add comment
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harley_52
22812
Points
harley_52 12/15/11 - 05:05 pm
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I suggest the best solution

I suggest the best solution is to close the doors and end the USPS for good. Perhaps give a 6 month warning, or at least 90 days, but then close it, lock, stock, and barrel. Offer to sell the existing assets to private industry at fifty percent of appraised value and make some sort of rational agreement on how to transfer the people they may choose to hire along with their shares of whatever reserve funds might be accrued.

The problem is one of both Republican and Democrat doing and is precisely what should be expected when government gets into the provision of a service which should be provided by private industry.

bjphysics
36
Points
bjphysics 12/15/11 - 05:06 pm
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0
USPS needs an ad campaign

USPS needs an ad campaign that features Darrell Issa as the prosecutor trying to have Kris Kringle declared mentally incompetent; the defense can call his son, Billy, to the stand where he testifies his daddy told him Santa would bring him the GI-Joe with the Kung Fu grip and his daddy would never lie.

harley_52
22812
Points
harley_52 12/15/11 - 05:12 pm
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bjphysics said "Is it

bjphysics said "Is it Cultural literacy?"

Hmmm. Cultural literacy. I guess so. If I were a liberal I might hide behind a term like that. To me, it sounds like a term a liberal would come up with to explain why they just used a movie scene to explain a real world problem. Make the common assertion that 'only us enlightened folk really get it.'

Reminds me of an earlier assertion you made about Southerners.

bjphysics
36
Points
bjphysics 12/15/11 - 05:32 pm
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In 1984 I loved the movie Red

In 1984 I loved the movie Red Dawn; saw it 3 times on the big screen. My liberal friends insisted it was rightwing propaganda and dangerous for American-Soviet relations, I insisted it was free-speech and not anti-commie; rather it was pro-American, telling the story of how Americans would heed the call to defend their soil when the time came. I insisted the Soviets were just the appropriate fictional enemy to use in the film given current events and it would make no sense to use the Dutch or the French.

Because of my efforts and activities as a weapons designer for DoD, I was branded and expelled from the army of Liberal-Topia as a rightwing turncoat and coward:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXlUS5-ag_g

I was innocent, not a charge was true but the world would never know…

bjphysics
36
Points
bjphysics 12/15/11 - 05:47 pm
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I was also chastised for my

I was also chastised for my claim that the primary use of the 2nd Amendment should be for as many Americans as are willing, to keep a militarily effective weapon and ammo buried under environmentally protective conditions to be unearthed in the event of invasion or tyranny. I still believe that and still keep an AR-15 buried.

harley_52
22812
Points
harley_52 12/15/11 - 05:48 pm
0
0
Once after three putting an

Once after three putting an important hole in an expensive match with a friend I wanted to beat I broke a putter over my knee like the way the guy in the clip broke Chuck Connors' sword. Unfortunately, when the shaft broke it slashed a four-inch, jagged hole in my leg which bled like a stuck pig and forced me to head for the doctor's office, forfeiting the match and losing the cash.

Real world vs. movies. The sword broke perfectly in the movie. It probably wouldn't in real life.

bjphysics
36
Points
bjphysics 12/15/11 - 06:12 pm
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My dad was Special Forces, in

My dad was Special Forces, in 1963ish (I think) he was in Barbados for Operation Invade Somebody. In a bar some Navy guy was showing off a golf club he claimed “could not be broken”. My dad took the club and broke it over his knee twice, yielding three pieces. The handle, mid-piece, and end are mounted on a plaque hanging in his study. Go Army!

bjphysics
36
Points
bjphysics 12/15/11 - 06:13 pm
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0
Riverman1
81414
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Riverman1 12/15/11 - 06:25 pm
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BJ, Wolverines!!!

BJ, Wolverines!!!

bjphysics
36
Points
bjphysics 12/15/11 - 06:28 pm
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Wolverines!!!

Wolverines!!!

dstewartsr
20389
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dstewartsr 12/15/11 - 06:37 pm
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Unlike most of the posters, I

Unlike most of the posters, I actually worked for the Post Office, so my worm's eye view may not have the impressive weight and title of pre-concluded academic studies, but they are first hand:

Junk mail may be an annoyance, but it keeps the boat afloat, in general.

There ARE a number of inefficient and uneconomic small offices; like schools or other institutions, with size comes the efficiency of scale. We're getting our money's worth out of Martinez and Evans and Grovetown; each of these offices cover a vast area efficiently. Boneville? Not so much.

The bureacracy is staggering. Postal inspectors do nothing but harrass the actual workers. The worker pay is very good, and it has to be; the institution has all the Deming model of input and respect of a gulag- without the good weather. Eliminate nine out of ten P.I's; offer them the chance to stay on as junior rural carriers.

For those that don't know about mail delivery except from Dagwood & Blondie there isn't this one little satchel of mail. Mail is presorted (by the carrier) into trays, two parallel rows of letters one after another in reverse delivery order, pressed in tightly. On the route I worked, there were nine feet of letters on average, this does not include flyers, packages, special handling mail. Your rural carrier delivers this on a route (prescribed by the postal muckety-mucks) in a matter of hours, regardless of weather. The function of the postal inspector is to make sure the carrier does not stop too long --for say, like water, on one of Augusta's 100+ days while delivering in an open cab. This is done by an inspector randomly following in an airconditioned government vehicle.

Can we do without six-day delivery? Yes. But more to the point; can we do without the bureacrats? Oh hell, yes!

burninater
9361
Points
burninater 12/15/11 - 07:08 pm
0
0
Young Fred, here's another

Young Fred, here's another article with further case documentation of efficiency and service declines after privatization:

http://www.inthepublicinterest.org/node/457

Many of the scholarly articles on this topic are international studies, and I'm trying to stick to U.S. case studies as they are clearly more relevant.

"Comparisons between the public and private sector is something most citizens can witness first hand on a fairly regular basis" is an interesting statement -- you're not talking about TARP by chance, are you?

Carleton Duvall
6305
Points
Carleton Duvall 12/15/11 - 07:16 pm
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0
dstewartsr, As a customer of

dstewartsr, As a customer of the USPS, I am sure,longer than anyone that comments on these pages I would like to send my gratitude to you and others who have pride in their work.Your efforts are appreciated by most. Sadly, the post office has served its need as conditions beyond your control have brought that need to an end. Not today, maybe, but soon.

dstewartsr
20389
Points
dstewartsr 12/15/11 - 07:44 pm
0
0
Thank you for that, but I do

Thank you for that, but I do not agree. I suspect it will go on, once the onerous pension plan has been modified. I deal regularly and have lived abroad and will state my own experience is more efficient -in general- and sure less expensive. Reliability of service is actually at the top of the world's in every comparison.

dstewartsr
20389
Points
dstewartsr 12/15/11 - 07:49 pm
0
0
RM, BJ, while I suppose

RM, BJ, while I suppose having your own assault-style weapon is comforting, if there comes to a need for them, there will be an almost unlimited supply at hand. During WWII, the military dropped the FP-45 into occupied areas. It was a single-shot stamped metal government supplied zip gun. The idea was simple: The enemy has good guns; let us shoot him and take HIS. Worked then, will again.

You see more at http://www.adrax.com/watsons/lib.htm

Riverman1
81414
Points
Riverman1 12/15/11 - 07:58 pm
0
0
DStewartsr, THAT was

DStewartsr, THAT was interesting. Just remember if you are on guard duty with the Wolverines, you better not play around.

Remember the Japanese were afraid of our armed civilians.

KSL
124853
Points
KSL 12/15/11 - 09:38 pm
0
0
If Obamacare is good enough

If Obamacare is good enough for the taxpayers, and unfortunately the non-contributors of anything, why is it not good enough for postal workers. And for other government workers. And why not for the congressmen and the executive office and the judicial branch. If a Supreme Court judge was about to go under Obamacare, how do you think he/she would rule on the constitutionality? If Obama himself could not carry an arsenal of doctors on his trip abroad, would he want to be subjected to Obamacare? Would our ex-presidents live as long as they do?

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