A 'scandal'? Not by comparison

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain pauses while speaking at the Congressional Health Caucus Thought Leaders Series on Wednesday.

Herman Cain’s surprising top-tier presidential campaign will sail or sink based largely on his own behavior: what he may have done years ago, certainly, but perhaps more so what he does now; how he comports himself and handles what appears to be the biggest challenge of his life.

We suspect he has the character and chutzpah to handle it – but his political inexperience, so often considered a feather in his cap, is so far rearing its head. He needs to be more of a sea of calm in the midst of a hurricane, for that’s what is demanded of our president.

The jury is still out on how he’ll weather this.

But while we take his measure, it would behoove the country to keep several other things in mind.

First, that whoever leaked the allegations of sexual harassment to the media had ulterior motives – the chief one being that he or she wants to shape the presidential election, by preventing you from having the opportunity to vote for Herman Cain or make him our president. The question is, will Americans give shadowy, double-dealing back-stabbers that kind of power?

You also have to wonder how much more zealous the “mainstream” media are about all this than if, say, Cain were a Democrat. One of the forgotten aspects of the Bill Clinton scandal is that the media were at first loath to report it. And even then, they granted him the odd comfort of the 60 Minutes couch to rehabilitate his image (and lie through his teeth).

And speaking of the term “scandal,” we’ve heard several broadcast folks use it in this case. How sad, if the mere unsubstantiated report of anonymous allegations of possible past loutish behavior, yet unproved, is given such a label.

The word is more properly affixed to a presidential administration giving out hundreds of billions of taxpayer funds to its political cronies, only to lose the money on preordained business failures (Solyndra) – or a federal government that purposely allows hundreds of high-powered guns to be sold to ultra-violent Mexican drug cartels (without the Mexican government’s knowledge), and then a U.S. border agent is killed with one (Fast and Furious).

Or insiders trying to rig elections.

More

Sun, 12/04/2016 - 22:47

AP’s bias persists

Sun, 12/04/2016 - 18:09

Now the watchdogs bark