Don't ask why

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Rabbi Harold Kushner wrote a wildly famous book years ago, but many people nonetheless get the title wrong when speaking to him.

It’s When Bad Things Happen to Good People, he likes to remind.

Not “why.”

“‘Why’ questions must be asked,” the Rev. Rodger Murchison said Thursday, “but in the end they are a one-way road to nowhere. I challenge us all to change our grief question from ‘Why’ to ‘What’.”

The good minister from First Baptist Church of Augusta was speaking at the packed funeral for slain Richmond County Sheriff’s Deputy James D. Paugh. But he could have been talking about any of us. Asking “why” yields little that our mortal brains can process. The better question is what: What will we do about the mysterious and maddening challenges that life hands us? What will our attitude be?

These are the things within our control and comprehension.

Famed psychiatrist Viktor Frankl suggested that we not ask questions of life anyway – rather, that we seek to understand what life is asking of us and respond accordingly.

As for the aftermath of Deputy Paugh’s murder, at the hands of a gunman who ultimately turned the weapon on himself, Rev. Murchison suggested being an ordinary person doing extraordinary things – a hero – like Paugh.

“Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is admirable — think about such things,” Murchison said, quoting the Bible.

Never is that advice more valuable than at times such as these.

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Riverman1
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Riverman1 10/30/11 - 09:04 am
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You have to wonder if Viktor

You have to wonder if Viktor Frankl ever experienced deep grief at the horrific events he witnessed and simply, sadly and stoically decided this is not right? There comes a time not to be optimistic, not so philosophical, but simply to grieve tragedy.

allhans
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allhans 10/30/11 - 11:18 am
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Not ask "why"? You might as

Not ask "why"? You might as well ask us not to mourn.

faithson
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faithson 10/30/11 - 12:43 pm
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Or you could ask 'why' the

Or you could ask 'why' the man had an assault rifle with multiple 20 round clips. We could do something about our 'grief'... we could ban assault anti-personal weapons and save a future law enforcement officers life. Yea, we could do THAT! I know the men and women in uniform sure would appreciate it

allhans
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allhans 10/30/11 - 01:28 pm
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faithson..and we would still

faithson..and we would still ask "why" it had to be someone I cared so much about.

TParty
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TParty 10/30/11 - 04:13 pm
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Isaiah 45:7

Isaiah 45:7

scott-hudson
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scott-hudson 10/30/11 - 10:09 pm
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You are right Michael

You are right Michael Ryan..We do not ask why...we ask what do we all do now...and the community did just that, and poured their love on our living law enforcement officers and their families. The day we laid JD Paugh to rest was a sad day for me personally, but it was also a day that reinforced in my heart why I am proud to call myself an Augustan. This community stood up and stood up tall.

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