Resumes and reality

New graduates have to adjust to a no-guarantees job market

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You cry when baby goes off to kindergarten. You cry again when baby struts across the stage to get a high school diploma. Then you cry when baby goes off to college.

Then maybe you cry when baby comes back.

Ask the Italian couple who recently went to authorities to begin eviction proceedings against their son, who “demands that his clothes be washed and ironed and his meals prepared. He really has no intention of leaving.”

He’s 41.

America’s future?

Trying to get a job is a full-time job these days, and it gets worse for those who don’t have a degree in an area of study that’s in high-demand.

Rhiannon Martin, an Augusta State University graduate, remains unemployed and living in her parents’ home even after graduating over five years ago with a degree in theater. She said in a Chronicle article Sept. 19, “I just want to do something I enjoy and stay out of debt.”

That used to be a fairly modest ambition.

She is like many other 20-somethings who have graduated with a college degree, especially in liberal arts, and have not found work. Unfortunately, Augusta does not offer as much in her field as the bigger cities do. Now she faces a tough decision: to stay within her comfort zone by living with her parents and pursue either more education or a job unrelated to theater, or move to a larger city and work toward getting work doing something she will enjoy.

It remains that the economy is horrible for new graduates; employers receive dozens of résumés a week for one position. Applicants now have to exceed all expectations, whether applying for their dream job or a fast-food chain.

Students who are still in college should take advantage of this time to get their foot in the door of their choosing simply by volunteering, interning and associating with programs that are related to their occupational interests – whether paid or not.

Even being involved in these extracurricular activities won’t guarantee much after graduation. Students need to be reasonable regarding their aspirations and realize that right now, they are going to have to go the long route to get where they want to be – it isn’t going to easy, regardless of one’s qualifications.

Many students are taking the road more traveled by majoring in health sciences or learning technical skills, which lead to some of the most lucrative careers in the market right now. Liberal arts students may need to decide if it’s really worth the initial investment of college tuition for a degree with an uncertain future, and whether they are willing to do more than just send out résumés every day, but to actually pack up and move to where they have a better opportunity to start a career they will enjoy. It all comes down to how badly they want it and how far they are willing to go to make it happen.

Even then, there are no guarantees.

These are choices graduates face almost every year, but never more than now. However, those who willingly choose to major in the arts, knowing the risks of unemployment, should also be willing to make changes and sacrifices to get a career in their field of choice. Otherwise they are just another résumé in the pile.

Comments (45) Add comment
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omnomnom
3964
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omnomnom 10/16/11 - 10:28 pm
0
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A timely well thought out

A timely well thought out editorial from ACES. Here are some other helpful suggestions to students or soon to be grad students out there. Outsource yourself! Go work in another country (its not just for corporations). Learn a trade. You ain't gotta go ter school ter make high dollars dagnabbit. Dumpster drive. Curb crawl. Grow your own garden. Raise rabbits fer food. Make paper mache Guy Fawkes masks out of the AC and Occupy Augusta.

Austin Rhodes
2866
Points
Austin Rhodes 10/16/11 - 10:34 pm
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Careful there ACES...I had a

Careful there ACES...I had a comment yanked that wasn't nearly as harsh as this...

robaroo
779
Points
robaroo 10/16/11 - 10:43 pm
0
0
You won't get a job with a

You won't get a job with a college degree in basket weaving. Employers hire people to do tasks they need have done.

But don't major in a technical degree if you don't have an interest in it or an aptitude in it. Whatever you major in, it has to be something you want to do or you won't be happy.

scott-hudson
10
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scott-hudson 10/16/11 - 10:54 pm
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0
This is a really dumb

This is a really dumb editorial. My degree is in Political Science and History and while I am in media, I also run a small business...both things I wanted, strived for and achieved...My degree helped me in many ways, but I have friends with MBA's that work as servers. Education + drive =success....Heck, I might go back and get a degree in theater just for the fun of it, it hasn't hurt Doug Joiner.

scott-hudson
10
Points
scott-hudson 10/16/11 - 10:58 pm
0
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And yeah, the 41 year old

And yeah, the 41 year old squatter in Italy? That is socialism for you. 'Nuff said.

scott-hudson
10
Points
scott-hudson 10/17/11 - 12:05 am
0
0
Young Fred, I do not

Young Fred, I do not disagree...I cleaned many a dish pit and grease trap before I became the boss and master of my destiny...you cannot even begin to imagine that smell (the grease trap!)...Right now, there are about 15 people at ASU that will graduate with a commercial book deal under their belt thanks to their drive and energy, they will enter the working world with a resume and a liberal arts degree, and it is then up to them to shine...we need those folks..we need actors and we need musicians...we also need car mechanics and there is a school for that too...one of my best friends owns a paint and body shop and he has no college degree, but he has made it well in life doing what he loves...I still think the editorial was dumb, don't give up on your dreams, make them come true...MAKE THEM come true.

DuhJudge
206
Points
DuhJudge 10/17/11 - 07:26 am
0
0
When a person chooses a

When a person chooses a school for higher education and they are only 17 or 18 years old, they will probably choose something to study that is familiar in some way that makes it relevant. But most will fail to excel. I am not much about the culture of encouraging everyone to go to college. The best education for most work positions comes from experience. I would send everyone to technical school in this economy. The whole idea about higher education is to make yourself more valuable. And the best jobs are networked anyway. A resume' .....because you went to college....like millions of others....??? An employer generally could care less about what you studied....they will teach you a job. Just demonstrate how you can be expected to excel and contribute. Or get a government job.

seenitB4
88080
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seenitB4 10/17/11 - 07:44 am
0
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I agree we need more tech

I agree we need more tech schools...not everyone is college material nor should they be..we need plumbers-landscapers-roofers-carpenters--hey ...the very jobs we still have in this country btw...so far they haven't figured a way to outsource them--weell they have brought in workers from other places though......sigh......it is tough in the USA today-----we have to change the job situation...the sooner the better..
Please check what you buy--try to buy USA products----you just might give your kid a job!

dougk
3
Points
dougk 10/17/11 - 07:51 am
0
0
It's not only dumb, Scott,
Unpublished

It's not only dumb, Scott, it's dangerous and misleading. Thankfully, no college student or would-be college student is reading it ...the dangerous part is that parents may be.

Riverman1
84893
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Riverman1 10/17/11 - 07:57 am
0
0
To take it another step,

To take it another step, journalism majors should be prepared to work part time menial labor jobs the way that market is. Editors can't demand a full salary at this time of hard copy media cutbacks and should be prepared to pursue journalism as a part time occupation. How's them apples?

Riverman1
84893
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Riverman1 10/17/11 - 07:59 am
0
0
Scott Hudson said, "Right

Scott Hudson said, "Right now, there are about 15 people at ASU that will graduate with a commercial book deal under their belt..."

I seriously doubt that if you are talking book deals with traditional publishers. Do you mean a form of self publishing, books on demand type arrangements?

seenitB4
88080
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seenitB4 10/17/11 - 08:25 am
0
0
I might write a novel & river

I might write a novel & river you just might be the leading man....about Georgia-rivers-land-country folks------southern goodoleboys...might out sell GWTW...hahhah

scott-hudson
10
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scott-hudson 10/17/11 - 08:44 am
0
0
No Riverman, a formal

No Riverman, a formal announcement is forthcoming. Dr. Debra VanTuyll and myself are under contract with a major publisher to write about the first 70 years of WGAC radio (from J.B Fuqua to James Brown and Harley Drew). The students will be listed as contributors and the book will be released Masters Week 2012.

Little Lamb
46392
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Little Lamb 10/17/11 - 09:02 am
0
0
The way I first read it was

The way I first read it was that each of the 15 students would have an individual book deal. As you explain it, it sounds like only one book deal with 17 authors.

scott-hudson
10
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scott-hudson 10/17/11 - 09:17 am
0
0
Yes, LL it is one book, the

Yes, LL it is one book, the students are aiding Dr. VanTuyll and I with every aspect of it, so they will be listed as contributors. However, it is a real commercial publication project and the students will be leaving college as published authors. A rare thing, but it is real and not vanity press.

Austin Rhodes
2866
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Austin Rhodes 10/17/11 - 09:27 am
0
0
There is a serious disconnect

There is a serious disconnect between desire and commitment when it comes to many of these folks putting in their time at the "bottom of the totem pole" before they move into the profitable stages of their career. My own daughter suffers from the notion of "champagne tastes on a root beer budget". She is steadily outgrowing the affliction, but it has taken a steady stream of "NO" from her parents, and the harsh reality of having to make monthly payments for stupid mistakes she made to wake her up. BTW...she is a sophomore in college, and 20 years old. If she isn't completely clear of this "mental weakness" by the time she graduates, I have failed her as a Father in a very important part of growing up.

The lack of personal dedication, combined with the technology evolution of the last 20 years that has eliminated many entry level positions (like in the fields of TV and radio), is a formidable obstacle.

scott-hudson
10
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scott-hudson 10/17/11 - 09:43 am
0
0
AR on that point I must

AR on that point I must whole-heartedly agree..I flunked out of college at 19, then went back at 30 and graduated the Honors Program...And you have made the point before that college isn't for everyone and it is certainly not going to MAKE you successful...but still, I don't think it is responsible to attempt to persuade people not to go just because the job market is tough...it is tough for everyone college educated or not.

Formerly Shivas
0
Points
Formerly Shivas 10/17/11 - 09:45 am
0
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Even Austin Rhodes places

Even Austin Rhodes places blame for his daughter's potential failure upon himself as a parent, instead of giving the responsibility to his daughter. Looks like a lot of failures occupying wall street.

Formerly Shivas
0
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Formerly Shivas 10/17/11 - 09:47 am
0
0
Oh, and I do agree with the

Oh, and I do agree with the AC. Look at all these journalism majors who can't find a real job, and end-up working at the AC, some even becoming editors. How else to explain such ignorant rantings. 999.

Chillen
17
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Chillen 10/17/11 - 09:56 am
0
0
We've come to a point in

We've come to a point in America where you really have to question the need for a college degree.

Many have tens (if not hundreds) of thousands in student loan debt. They've been told their entire lives that they must go to college or that they "deserve" to go to college. Just like everyone "deserved" to own a home (look where THAT got us!).

College is a good idea if you plan to be a nurse, a doctor, or a lawyer. But truly you don't need it for many career paths.

It's time for America to sit down, re-evaluate their priorities and make smarter choices. More independent choices. Don't do what society pushes you to do. Do what YOU know you need to do.

Willow Bailey
20602
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Willow Bailey 10/17/11 - 09:57 am
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Austin stated... "If she

Austin stated... "If she isn't completely clear of this "mental weakness" by the time she graduates, I have failed her as a Father in a very important part of growing up."

Not true, Austin. Remember your own youth, and be encouraged. You've done your best by her and she has a choice to listen or go her own way. Life will teach her. As a Dad, stand quietly by, ready to listen, love her, encourage her, and ask, hmmm, honey, what are YOU going to do about that? We didn't do it perfectly, and neither will they.

Girls are hardheaded, but they love their Dad's forever and actually recall what they have taught them, even if it takes years later... "Always Daddy's Girl."

Austin Rhodes
2866
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Austin Rhodes 10/17/11 - 10:01 am
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0
Formerly... Neither of of us

Formerly...
Neither of of us has failed, yet. At 20, the only failures involve incarceration, addiction, or unwed parenthood. The rest is all education and experience. I do not deny I have over indulged my daughter on occasion, but she drives a 15 year old car and works multiple jobs while attending school. She is doing just fine, and the experience she gained through her mistakes is invaluable. Mine too.

Formerly Shivas
0
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Formerly Shivas 10/17/11 - 10:00 am
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Finally, the real point is we

Finally, the real point is we complain about no manufactoring jobs, and everything moving to Mexico and other cheap labor countries, but crticize the OWS because they just need to get a job and pay dues. I guess that means working fast food. Wall Street is raping the country and has no incentive to keep jobs here because our labor costs cut into profit. That is the crux of OWS: Wall Street's uncontrollable greed has created an economic environment of maximizing profits at all costs, even moving jobs out of our country. Yet, the AC calls this capatilism, while OWS calls this greed. Can you not see there is truth to both of these points? I bet not, since we are a culture that would rather demonize through extreme entertainers such as Rush L., and other wannabes. Creates a toxic environment, but is great for ratings. Some would call that greed as well. Anything to maximize profit.

Chillen
17
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Chillen 10/17/11 - 10:00 am
0
0
Apprenticeships, 2 year tech

Apprenticeships, 2 year tech school degrees, tech high schools should be the future. But that might be labeled racist or holding back the "poor". So, I doubt it will be done.

Formerly Shivas
0
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Formerly Shivas 10/17/11 - 10:04 am
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0
AR, I said "potential

AR, I said "potential failure." I am sure she will be very succesful and I am sure you are a great parent. Bad political opinions, but I would not use that as a reflection upon your personal character. That is more a ploy of the right-wing.

Chillen
17
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Chillen 10/17/11 - 10:04 am
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"Wall Street's uncontrollable

"Wall Street's uncontrollable greed has created an economic environment of maximizing profits at all costs, even moving jobs out of our country."

This could also be written this way:

Washington's uncontrollable greed has created an economic environment of maximizing their power at all costs though corporate cronyism and bailouts of political donors.

The problem is in Washington. Not corporate America.

Riverman1
84893
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Riverman1 10/17/11 - 10:25 am
0
0
Scott said, "No Riverman, a

Scott said, "No Riverman, a formal announcement is forthcoming. Dr. Debra VanTuyll and myself are under contract with a major publisher to write about the first 70 years of WGAC radio (from J.B Fuqua to James Brown and Harley Drew). The students will be listed as contributors and the book will be released Masters Week 2012."

Scott, no big deal and I'm not trying to put you on the spot, but that's hardly the same as 15 students having contracts for books. You made it sound like getting a liberal arts degree would give you the ability to get a book contract with a major publisher.

I know the publishing industry well and about 1 out of 800 manuscripts is accepted by major publishers. What MAJOR publisher is going to publish a book about the history of WGAC? That sounds like a local press deal. These students won't gain much from having their names on that as PUBLISHED AUTHORS. You might be surprised that some commenters on these boards have had books published that did well.

By the way, Austin's comments are honest and insightful. It sounds like his daugther is doing great. As someone who has raised two kids, I'll just say there comes a time...ha.

seenitB4
88080
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seenitB4 10/17/11 - 10:14 am
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0
Corporate America OWNS

Corporate America OWNS congress chillen......

Chillen
17
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Chillen 10/17/11 - 10:25 am
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You are right seenitB4.

You are right seenitB4. That's why we need sweeping govt/political reform.

Our system has (somehow) allowed this to happen. You can't change the businesses (unless they are breaking the law - because they are private entities) but you can change our govt.

We must get the govt out of the business of playing favorites. No bailouts, no stimulus, no more crony contacts (think Pelosi's brother in law who just got a $700 MILLION loan for his solar business).

Anyone caught doing it should be tried & jailed.

We need serious political reform in this country if we are to survive as an intact nation.

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