Hard time in Norway

If he survives his prison's rock-climbing wall and mini-bar, killer gets out in 21

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Stores in Norway may be selling out of torches and pitchforks.

There is a possibility that Anders Behring Breivik, confessed murderer of nearly 100 innocent men, women and children, will be sentenced to only 21 years in prison, max. Not only that, but his likely prison sounds more like a trendy resort -- with a rock-climbing wall, music recording studio, and mini-fridge in each inmate's "cell."

Needless to say, not all of the loved ones of the victims, folks around the world -- or Norwegians themselves -- are pleased.

Certainly, Norway's rates of crimes and incarcerations are much lower in comparison to America. But while many around the world like to point indignantly to America's death penalty, Norway's criminal justice system seems overly criminal-friendly. Some of its prisons are located on an island where the inmates work on a farm, help rebuild barns and, by doing so, are supposed to realize the error of their ways before re-entering society.

Such an approach may work in some classes of crime with some categories of criminal. But our friends in Norway may soon discover that their system is painfully lax on monsters such as the mass killer of Oslo.

This wanton reprobate paraded around as a police officer pretending to offer young campers protection right before he shot them at point blank range -- claiming it was "necessary" that he slaughter hordes of innocents to prove some demented point.

No amount of time alone with a rock wall will rehabilitate this loony loner. Anders Behring Breivik should never be released back into society, and certainly not in 21 years or less. He has already warned that he intends to spend the rest of his life in jail; if he's released, he may only seek ways to return.

But even if he gets out of prison, does not kill anyone, and is living quietly in the city as a fully changed man, the angry and devastated loved ones of the victims will have only suffered their loss for 21 agonizing years -- only to see the killer enjoying life as a free man among them.

And, if there were any torches and pitchforks left in the country, they might just be turned on him.

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Techfan
6462
Points
Techfan 08/08/11 - 04:49 am
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0
Once again the AC borrows

Once again the AC borrows (plagiarizes?) from the right wing blogoshere. Also, as usual, they either don't do the research to find out the whole story, or choose to only print part of the truth. The max sentence in Norway is 21 years, but judges have the right to keep the person in jail if he is deemed to be a risk to others or repeat his crimes. This is determined at 5 year intervals. I would say the likelihood of Breivik ever getting out is extremely slim.

burninater
9943
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burninater 08/08/11 - 06:00 am
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Influential Augustans

Influential Augustans explaining successful criminal management policy to Norwegians is like the Octomom explaining birth control to a nun. Try a mirror some time, you might start seeing things.

harley_52
26074
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harley_52 08/08/11 - 07:03 am
0
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Innocent civilians have no

Innocent civilians have no protection from armed lunatics, no protection from thieves in the night, nor from armed assassins hell bent on slaughtering them in the name of Allah.

Governments typically assume the role of citizen protector to some degree, but can't be at all places at all times. A proper role for government is to encourage, or at the very least allow, citizens to provide their own protection until government help arrives.

Norway, as an institution, is as much to blame here as Behring Breivik. Their laws and customs made the horrific slaughter possible. For a full hour and a half, his was the only gun on the island. He murdered the counselors and the children, one by one, shooting one and hunting down the next even as they tried climbing trees and swimming to escape his wrath. When he ran out of ammunition, he stopped to reload and then moved on with the slaughter. Nobody could stop him. Norway had set the stage, they gave Behring Breivik the leading role.

dougk
3
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dougk 08/08/11 - 08:27 am
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You certainly hit that nail
Unpublished

You certainly hit that nail on the head, burninator.

harley_52
26074
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harley_52 08/08/11 - 09:44 am
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According to one author, "If

According to one author, "If you're going to go on a maniacal murder rampage and then not have the decency to include yourself in the body count -- Norway is the place to do it."

He says "Norway takes the mantra of rehabilitation to an extreme. Not only are there no death sentences, there aren't life sentences. The maximum Breivik can face is 21 years (not per murder, but in total). Yes, there is a caveat that says a prisoner deemed to still be a threat can have his sentence expanded in five year blocks -- but in a very real sense, that means he will come up for parole every five years for the rest of his life -- or until he is no longer seen as a threat. Few killers in Norway serve more than 14 years."

When you have a government that refuses to let citizens arm themselves, takes weapons away from the police, and then coddles convicted murderers with short sentences to cushy prisons should anybody really be surprised at what happened?

http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/07/25/the_not_so_terrible_fate_...

burninater
9943
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burninater 08/08/11 - 10:11 am
0
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When you have a government

When you have a government that refuses to let citizens arm themselves, takes weapons away from the police, and then coddles convicted murderers with short sentences to cushy prisons should anybody really be surprised at what happened?
--------
By "what happened", do you mean consistently having one of the lowest violent crime rates, year after year, in the world?

Saying that this individual is representative of Norwegian criminality is identical to saying that this individual is representative of right-wing Christianity.

Neither is true, and accordingly, this single act does not nullify the clear example shown in Norway of a culture of nonviolence producing a nonviolent citizenry.

dougk
3
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dougk 08/08/11 - 10:12 am
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Homicide rate for Norway .6
Unpublished

Homicide rate for Norway .6 per 100,000 residents, compared to 5 per 100,000 in the U.S. Norway needs to get on the ball and follow the U.S., and it, too, can have a homicide rate 8 times higher, right harley??

justthefacts
25475
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justthefacts 08/08/11 - 10:17 am
0
0
Whole different dynamics in

Whole different dynamics in Norway. Whole different culture.

harley_52
26074
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harley_52 08/08/11 - 10:23 am
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dougk, you're stuck on

dougk, you're stuck on meaningless statistics. Ask the victims in this specific case.

I don't remember presenting the U.S. as any sort of model to be compared or emulated here. The U.S. has its own problems and our neither our crime rate nor our rate of recidivism are what I'm addressing.

My main point is that an armed citizenry is the best way to protect citizens from this sort of mayhem. Unless the government can protect citizens 100 percent of the time with a 100 percent success rate, they have no business denying them the capability to protect themselves.

Chillen
17
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Chillen 08/08/11 - 10:25 am
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I want to be "just like"

I want to be "just like" Norway.......
Where extremely tough gun laws make citizens sitting ducks.
Where tax rates are out of control.
Where the weather is freezing most of the year (average temp below freezing 5 months a year!).
Where I can live in a tiny country just the size of New Mexico that is far easier to manage that the giant United States.
Where government control is easy to find and a citizenry who have "accepted" that control reside.
Where the govt owns many key industries (sound familiar? cough cough obama!)

Sounds like a fantastic place.

harley_52
26074
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harley_52 08/08/11 - 10:31 am
0
0
Things are changing in

Things are changing in Norway, burninator, and across all of Europe. Traditional, European societies are being overrun by immigrants, most of whom have a different view of how their new countries should be run. European countries will soon be populated with significant minorities (and then majorities) of muslim immigrants. Even without terrorism, the transition from a European to a Muslim societies, legal systems, and governments will not come easily.

I am not suggesting this single horrific act is representative of anything in particular. I am saying it could have been prevented by a less restrictive gun policy. That's a fact that can't be reasonably argued and one that I think will be discussed a lot more frequently as the transition continues.

dougk
3
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dougk 08/08/11 - 10:37 am
0
0
Ethnocentrism runs amuck. At
Unpublished

Ethnocentrism runs amuck.
At least Norway has a AAA credit rating.

allhans
24964
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allhans 08/08/11 - 10:48 am
0
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The slaughter might have been

The slaughter might have been an unusual occurrence, the question is...Can it happen again, and will it?

Chillen
17
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Chillen 08/08/11 - 10:52 am
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allhans. The answer is

allhans. The answer is unfortunately yes. Human nature is what it is and it will never change.

Some people are controlled by government. Some people are controlled by right & wrong (morals). But some people are just uncontrollable. So yes, it will happen again. As long as humans are on the planet.

harley_52
26074
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harley_52 08/08/11 - 11:03 am
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***The slaughter might have

***The slaughter might have been an unusual occurrence, the question is...Can it happen again, and will it?***

Sure it will.

However, the chances of it happening in the immediate vicinity of someone legally carrying a concealed weapon are reduced substantially.

hounddog
0
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hounddog 08/08/11 - 05:23 pm
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dougk, ‘Homicide rate for
Unpublished

dougk, ‘Homicide rate for Norway .6 per 100,000 residents, compared to 5 per 100,000 in the U.S.’
Norway does not have the entitlement mentally that has been spread in the USA by liberal\progressives, leaders in the black community and black churches.
Our government is afraid to focus in on the real problem.

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