He let his people go

21st century pharaoh may have unleashed freedom in the land

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It happened exactly 32 years after the fall of the shah in Iran. But the Egyptian people's removal of President Hosni Mubarak Friday seems worlds apart.

Whereas the Iranians traded one tyranny for another, it appears our Egyptian friends are on a much more promising path to freedom.

We hope and pray that when the euphoria wears off and they catch up on their sleep that the Egyptian people can keep their country headed for the democratic republic the protesters seemed to want.

The stark truth is that this mostly -- amazingly -- peaceful revolution will either be very good or very bad, not just for the Egyptian people but most likely for many others in the Mideast, Arab and Israeli alike.

The key will be whether the Egyptians can hold it together long enough -- and keep the radical Muslim Brotherhood at bay well enough -- to create a secular government that respects their liberty and the liberty of others. A theocracy cannot hold sway over a free people; the two are so incompatible as to be mutually exclusive.

Of course, our worst fears are that an Islamic government will fill Mubarak's void. That cannot be good for the Egyptian people, or for U.S. interests -- or for peace in the Mideast.

But the alternative could be very, very good. Just consider the magnitude of a free Egypt, led by a secular government -- and all the implications for continued peace with Israel and a stability born of choice, not coercion.

And consider Iran -- where today a terrorist theocracy that, not too long ago, violently put down a popular uprising is now crowing about victory in Egypt. Really? The terrorcrats in Tehran better be careful what they wish for: If the Egyptian people come out of this freer and without a stultifying Islamic collar around their necks -- and we realize that's a huge "if" -- it could very well inspire a renewal of the freedom movement in Iran.

Now, that would be in everybody's best interests.

Except, of course, the tyrants'.

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usapatriot
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usapatriot 02/12/11 - 02:12 am
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"The key will be whether the

"The key will be whether the Egyptians can hold it together..."

And just who are these Egyptians? The military? The demonstrators? You don't know, do you AC. What was your point?

As Mark Levin said, 83.8 million of Egypt's 84 million people were home or working these last 18 days. The "man on the street" interviews showed how spontaneous this was. They don't know much except they wanted Mubarak out.

Sounds like a plan. "We don't know who or what's next, but this guy's gotta go NOW!" Nice of Obama to think that was a great plan too.

These people don't know what "freedom" is. Most are more concerned with having food day to day. 54% still think men and women need to be segregated in the work place. There's a nice start for democracy.

And there is that little sticking point that Islam and democracy were never meant for each other.

We can't assume that all the world wants our form of govt. We can't assume that all the world thinks like us. We can't believe that all people come to logical conclusions using the same mores and values we hold.

We can't assume all other people are like us or want to be like us.

Fact is, they don't.

Egyptian society is what, 5 - 10,000 years old? It's not far removed from its birth, is it?

Jon Lester
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Jon Lester 02/12/11 - 02:21 am
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@usapatriot: Seriously, dude,
Unpublished

@usapatriot: Seriously, dude, once you start quoting Mark Levin, it's time to stop listening. The man can't even add up how many people were demonstrating in Alexandria, Sharm el-Sheikh and other cities he probably couldn't name.

No, the new Egypt won't look very much like our society, and it's not just because of its demographics, but for having an informed public, as well.

deportem
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deportem 02/12/11 - 08:21 am
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The US supported Mubarak for

The US supported Mubarak for decades and sent Egypt tens of Billions of dollars in foreign aid over those decades. Mubarak was one of the moderates in the Middle East. Now that he has stepped down, the Muslim Brotherhood may wind up controlling the government. If the Egyptians thought they had it bad under Mubarak, it could get a lot worse for them, and for us.
Anyone remember waiting in lines for gas back in the 70s? If some of the leaders of the Arab oil producing countries decide the US needs to be punished for its interference, they will shut off the oil. They do NOT want democracy in their countries. By the way, we don't have it here, either, and our food prices are going up, millions of Americans are unemployed, our borders are wide open, etc.
How many millions of Americans marching in US streets would it take for Obama to step down?

Techfan
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Techfan 02/12/11 - 08:26 am
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They may be dictators but, by

They may be dictators but, by God, they're OUR dictators.

justthefacts
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justthefacts 02/12/11 - 08:34 am
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I have not seen the ACES or

I have not seen the ACES or anyone else, except Biden, who claimed Mubarak wasn't a dictator, advocate for supporting his remaining in power.

chascush
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chascush 02/12/11 - 08:37 am
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deportem, ‘How many millions

deportem, ‘How many millions of Americans marching in US streets would it take for Obama to step down?
The Tea party will be back out in 2012. All we need to do is vote to get the idiot community organizer out.

seenitB4
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seenitB4 02/12/11 - 09:29 am
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Why do we expect other

Why do we expect other countries to make good choices in leaders when we don't make them here??

Riverman1
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Riverman1 02/12/11 - 09:35 am
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I spent time in Egypt and

I spent time in Egypt and other mideastern countries. Egypt appeared to be the friendliest toward Americans and the most secular country. This was, of course, under Mubarak. I doubt whatever government takes power will be better for America.

chascush
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chascush 02/12/11 - 08:45 pm
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Egypt appeared to be the

Egypt appeared to be the friendliest toward Americans and the most secular country.’
There will be an all out war when several of the Muslim countries attack Israel. It will be sooner than later. I only hope it is not before we can get the trash out of the WH.

usapatriot
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usapatriot 02/12/11 - 11:35 pm
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Jon lester, did you count?

Jon lester, did you count? Even if he was off by 100-200k, that is belittling the point.

These people started demonstrating because they were hungry. Their civilization has been stagnant more or less for 5k years. They are Islamic in nature, not democratic.

Did you hear even 1 interview of a demonstrator saying who should replace Mubarak? What is their plan to fill a vacuum of power?

Their constitution says the Speaker of the People's Assembly takes over, not the vice President.

usapatriot
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usapatriot 02/12/11 - 11:37 pm
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Oh, Jon Lester, please call

Oh, Jon Lester, please call Mark Levin and match wits with the guy you say can't count. If, that is, you can spare a few moments away from watching Rachel Maddow.

usapatriot
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usapatriot 02/12/11 - 11:50 pm
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"Whereas the Iranians traded

"Whereas the Iranians traded one tyranny for another, it appears our Egyptian friends are on a much more promising path to freedom."

Who's writing this? The Iranian's that overthrew the Shah in 1979 were Islamic extremists, directed by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who was in exile in France.

These Egyptians are poor, hungry souls with no plan and ripe for Islamic takeover.

"And consider Iran -- where today a terrorist theocracy that, not too long ago, violently put down a popular uprising is now crowing about victory in Egypt. Really?"

Yeah, really AC. Because the "only" name around who wants to take over and who American liberals love is el-Baradei. He's the UN stooge who ran interference for Iran, claiming he could find no evidence of an Iranian nuclear weapons program.

This is why Iran is grinning ear to ear under their towels. Radical Islam's goal is to rule the world. They've just been handed a key piece in the Middle East. They will be taking an ally away from the US and restoring it to Islam. It will be a great PR event. More and more under educated, illiterate Arab youth will believe in their fatal Islamic destiny and join jihad.

If Jordan falls and Egypt becomes fundamentalist, Israel is backed into a corner and at some point will strike out. That's not good.

Still celebrating a "freedom" movement?

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