A solution -- but for what?

Order for troops to the southern border looks like a weak Band-Aid fix

Is the president actually listening, or just trying to kill the noise?

President Obama has announced he will send an almost completely ineffective number of National Guard troops to the Southwest border in an attempt to pacify the pleas for action in Arizona and the United States. The orders do not yet specify which troops from which states will be sent, nor do they specify how our president believes that 1,200 troops on the border will create any solution when those closest to and most informed about the problem have clearly stated that the border needs 6,000 troops in order to begin cracking down on illegal immigration.

National Border Patrol Council President T. J. Bonner knows that this effort will provide little relief to the border violence. Bonner says we shouldn't be surprised if border violence continues as usual after the troops are deployed.

President Bush put forth a similarly ineffective plan, which actually prohibited Guardsmen from detaining illegal immigrants. Now, it looks like Obama is doing the same thing as Bush -- only this time, it's likely to be even less effective. He is calling for one-fifth of the number of troops, stretching them along 2,000 miles of border.

Bonner knows that this effort will do nothing, as do Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, and the state's two U.S. senators, John McCain and Jon Kyl. Repeatedly, they have maintained that this effort isn't enough. The troops will be stretched thinly, and while even a merely vigilant presence of border troops has a threatening effect on illegal immigrants and drug cartels on the border, there won't be enough intimidating presence to actuate this result.

It seems as though Obama is trying to eliminate the complaints about illegal immigrants rather than the illegals themselves. If the president was trying to provide a real solution, he would have listened to the people who know what the problem is and acted accordingly. Instead, he didn't even apprise McCain and Kyl about his National Guard decision Tuesday -- despite having met with them.

Georgia senators Johnny Isakson and Saxby Chambliss on Wednesday signed on to an amendment that would provide the 6,000 Guardsmen needed.

Meanwhile, the president is cynically sticking a Band-Aid on border violence and illegal immigration, hoping to silence the cries of U.S. citizens.

All the while, Texas officials wait for an answer to a year-and-a-half-old request for federal border help in that state.

True, we have to start somewhere, and any step forward is helpful, but shouldn't the first step at least resemble a step in an effective, informed direction?

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