Rick McKee Editorial Cartoon

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seenitB4
91155
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seenitB4 02/17/12 - 07:16 am
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Yep...that's our world

Yep...that's our world today...sad

gaflyboy
5074
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gaflyboy 02/17/12 - 09:54 am
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The best form of comedy is

The best form of comedy is just to tell it like it is ... not funny! But a good one Rick.

bjphysics
36
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bjphysics 02/17/12 - 12:12 pm
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Bring back the 4th Amendment

Bring back the 4th Amendment for everyone.

KSL
135720
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KSL 02/17/12 - 12:16 pm
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If you are on the public

If you are on the public dole, you should lose some rights, kind of like being in prison.

KSL
135720
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KSL 02/17/12 - 12:29 pm
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bjphysics
36
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bjphysics 02/17/12 - 12:41 pm
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One step toward protecting

One step toward protecting your rights is to not endorse the diminution of other’s rights.

“The rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened.”

― John F. Kennedy

tanbaby
1305
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tanbaby 02/17/12 - 03:10 pm
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to KSL, isn't the only right
Unpublished

to KSL, isn't the only right that prisoners lose freedom??? they keep basically everything else...

bjphysics
36
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bjphysics 02/17/12 - 03:49 pm
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tanbaby, I think it's the

tanbaby, I think it's the other way around - prisoners keep most rights but: limits on 1st, lose all of 2nd and 4th.

They keep most of their other rights especially their 3rd right:

“No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.”

Prisoners do not have to bivouac soldiers in their cells but no mention is made of sailors so there could be a loophole there.

afadel
518
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afadel 02/17/12 - 05:57 pm
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aside from the question of

aside from the question of morality, Florida, which implemented this proposal, found that only a small percentage of people seeking public assistance tested positive. In fact, the implementation of the drug testing was much more expensive than any money saved. Oh, and I think a prominent politician who advocated the testing had a financial interest in the company which did a lot of the testing.

Contrary to some people's thinking, poverty and sickness which drive people to seek public assistance are not always caused by substance abuse.

Rick McKee
416
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Rick McKee 02/17/12 - 06:14 pm
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afadel, there is also

afadel, there is also evidence that in Florida, welfare applicants removed themselves from the process once they found out they would be drug-tested, having completed all other steps and being found eligible for benefits. Almost all employers require drug-testing these days, so should these welfare recipients ever attempt to enter the workforce, this will be good practice for them.

Jane18
12332
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Jane18 02/17/12 - 08:13 pm
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"a picture is worth a

"a picture is worth a thousand words". You nailed it Rick, and we know all the words(who).

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