Faces of survival: Jane Enyeart

This monthlong series introduces women diagnosed with breast cancer

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HER BACKGROUND

Jane Enyeart's Yorkie, Dori, lost her leg after a fall, but hasn't let it slow her down. "She's my champion. We have each other. We both have our handicaps."  Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Jane Enyeart's Yorkie, Dori, lost her leg after a fall, but hasn't let it slow her down. "She's my champion. We have each other. We both have our handicaps."

AGE: 69

FAMILY: Three sons and eight grandchildren

OCCUPATION: Retired

DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT: May 2000, lumpectomy, chemotherapy and radiation

HER STORY

Enyeart calls herself the poster person for her type of cancer. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2000, had a lumpectomy and underwent treatment. Tumors popped up in her lungs in 2003 and 2008, and in a lymph node in 2009. Last month she went through radiation again for a tumor in the marrow of her femur.

She said most people, when cancer starts to travel around the body, live only about five more years. It's already been 10 since her initial diagnosis and she's still going strong.

"I've always just tried to make the best of everything," she said.

Enyeart has had practice in keeping her chin up in the face of adversity. Her husband left her for another woman while she was going through her first round of treatment for breast cancer.

She leaned on her family and friends to get her through all of it, and stayed active playing tennis and other sports, just like she always has.

She also finds inspiration in her little Yorkie, Dori, who fell off of a counter and broke her leg. It had to be amputated, but she doesn't let her missing leg slow her down.

Enyeart doesn't let cancer slow her down, either.

She now allows it to be only one small piece of her wonderful life, preferring to focus on things such as visiting her children, grandchildren and friends.

HER ADVICE

"Be proactive," she said. "Know as much as you can about the disease, the treatments, the drugs, the doctors. Stay connected and don't do it alone. There's no point in being miserable and feeling sorry for yourself. You just have to stay connected, stay interesting and stay interested."

-- Lisa Kaylor, staff

Jane Enyeart's Yorkie, Dori, lost her leg after falling off the counter, but she hasn't let it slow her down. "She's my champion. We have each other. We both have our handicaps." \nRAINIER EHRHARDT/STAFF

On life with cancer

"I don't live the life of the pink breast cancer person. I'd rather not talk about it and have people say, 'How are you feeling?' "

Jane Enyeart

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