Historical marker to honor black journalist

A historical marker will be unveiled Saturday honoring the Rev. Silas Xavier Floyd, who documented the world of black Augustans from the 1890s to the 1920s, first as editor of the Augusta Sentinel newspaper and later through his columns in The Augusta Chronicle.

 

Floyd was a poet, author, school administrator, pastor, writer and editor.

The ceremony begins at 10 a.m. at 1025 12th St., his former home. The site is now the chapter house of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., whose members bought it in 1953.

Floyd’s writings include a biography of C.T. Walker; a children’s book, Floyd’s Flowers; a book of sermons, The Gospel of Service and Other Sermons; and numerous poems and articles in national publications.

A bylined contributor to The Chronicle from the early 1900s until his death in 1923, Floyd’s weekly column evolved into “Notes Among the Colored People,” which offered social commentary on African-American life.

Among his many accomplishments, Floyd was the principal of the First Ware Gram­mar School, a member of the Academy of Politi­cal and So­cial Sciences, the chairman of the Colored Char­i­table Relief in the wake of Au­gusta’s fire of 1916 and pastor of Tab­ernacle Baptist Church.

The marker is being erected by the Georgia His­tor­ical Society, Alpha Phi Al­pha Fraternity’s Alpha Chi Lambda chapter, and the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History.

 

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