Crappie hot spots identified at Thurmond Lake

Monday, March 17, 2014 6:30 PM
Last updated 11:04 PM
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Augusta’s weather still has a chill to it, but the mouths of major creeks and rivers at Thurmond Lake are hot with crappie.

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The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has announced that hot spots for the state's second most popular freshwater fish at Clarks Hill - crappie - include Soap, Fishing, Grays and Newford creeks.  FILE
FILE
The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has announced that hot spots for the state's second most popular freshwater fish at Clarks Hill - crappie - include Soap, Fishing, Grays and Newford creeks.

The Georgia Department of Nat­u­ral Resources has announced that hot spots for the state’s second-most popular freshwater fish at the lake include Soap, Fishing, Grays and New­ford creeks.

State fishery biologists also pointed to the Little River arm as a place where anglers can expect to find large schools of crappie congregating in shallow water in preparation for “spawning migration.”

“If you can locate them, they’re biting very well,” Georgia fishery biologist Chris Nelson said.

During winter, Nelson said, crappie tend to congregate in deeper water, generally 15 to 30 feet deep, near the mouths of major tributaries and in the main lake.

As the water warms in late March, he said, the fish will start moving to more shallow water toward the middle and back of major tributaries, preferring to congregate around “woody cover” such as stumps, logs, downed trees, fish attractors and creek ledges.

State biologists said that large schools are easily located with sonar electronics and that minnows and small jigs are favored bait. Light spinning tackle spooled with 6- or 8-pound test line was recommended.

“People are catching good numbers and sizes of crappie,” Nelson said. “The average catch right now is about one-half to three-quarter pound, and it is not uncommon for someone to reel in 2-pounders.”

Anglers eager to get out on the water also can prepare themselves for cold-weather striped bass. This time of year, it is common to catch
5- to 15-pounders, with the occasional landing of a 30-pounder or greater, Nel­son said. The lake is annually stocked with striped bass and has an abundant baitfish population, including blueback herring and threadfin and gizzard shad.

State biologists said anglers should target the Little River arm or below Richard B. Russell Dam, especially during power generation, which creates a current and stimulates a feeding response.

“Stripers follow much of same patterns of crappie,” Nelson said. “They prefer water temperatures less than 75 degrees and tend to concentrate over river channels and around submerged islands where threadfin shad and blueback herring are abundant.”

Wildlife Resources Divi­sion biologists recommend medium-to-heavy 6- to 7-foot rods equipped with 12- to 18-pound test line. Some common striper lures are 3/8-ounce white bucktail jigs, soft plastic jerk baits and large minnow bait. Anglers should cast to the shoreline or try trolling these artificial lures.

For more consistent results, live bait is recommended – 4- to 6-inch minnows or shad and blueback herring where legal (available at many local bait and tackle shops).

Biologists recommend fishing live bait shallow, less than 10 feet, with a large bobber and no weight attached (free-lining), or fishing vertically (down-lining) with a 1-ounce sinker weight at greater depths of 10-30 feet. A size 2-4 hook is recommended for fishing these larger live baits and landing big stripers.

Nelson said crappie are a more popular find than striper and a very tasty fish to eat.

A Southerner, Nelson said he filets his crappie, soaks and marinates them in zesty Italian dressing, then deep fries them in a coating of bread crumbs.

“It kind of gives the fish a little bit of a different taste,” he said. “But to me and everybody who usually eats what I fix, they are pretty pleased.”

THE HOT SPOTS

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has announced four hot spots for crappie at Thurmond Lake:

1. Newford Creek

2. Fishing Creek

3. Soap Creek (above)

4. Grays Creek

Comments (4) Add comment
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itsanotherday1
42228
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itsanotherday1 03/17/14 - 11:35 pm
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Record crappie

Wesley, how big is that crappie in the pic?

Caption on pic: "hot spots for the state's second most popular freshwater fish at Clarks Hill - crappie -"

Jillian Hobday
18
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Jillian Hobday 03/18/14 - 12:40 am
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@itsanotherday1

The photo is a file photo from 2007. The striper in the photo is 42 inches and 38.3 pounds. It was caught near Soap Creek.

Riverman1
82436
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Riverman1 03/18/14 - 06:34 am
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I believe IAD was pulling

I believe IAD was pulling your leg. The article is about crappie, but a striper is in the photo?

itsanotherday1
42228
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itsanotherday1 03/18/14 - 08:56 am
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Thanks RM.

Thanks RM.

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