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Ice storm could cause power outages, impassable roads

Monday, Feb. 10, 2014 5:41 PM
Last updated Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014 1:00 AM
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An impending ice storm could bring more treachery than last month’s snowfall, emergency management officials warned Monday.

Widespread power outages and impassable roads were chief concerns as officials cautioned residents to prepare before the storm hits the Augusta area.

The National Weather Service in West Columbia, S.C. issued a winter storm warning Monday afternoon, forecasting freezing rain, sleet and significant ice accumulations. The warning is in effect from 7 p.m. Tuesday to noon Thursday.

“This is a really bizarre storm for us,” said meteorologist Mike Proud. “It’s going to take a few days to pass.”

Between .4 and .5 inches of ice are expected in Augusta, said Proud, adding that ice storms in the past several years have measured about one-tenth of an inch. Freezing rain is expected to begin about 9 or 10 p.m. Tuesday.

“This is considerably more ice than we’ve seen,” he said. “It is something out of the ordinary.”

In Richmond and Columbia counties, emergency management teams placed salt trucks on standby and began preparations to remove fallen tree branches and report power outages if they happen.

The Richmond County Emergency Operations Center will be staffed around the clock beginning Tuesday afternoon, said Mie Lucas, the disaster preparedness coordinator. On Monday, officials reviewed emergency responses to the late January snowstorm that closed schools and offices for days.

“We just had snow two weeks ago so we are operating on best practices from that,” Lucas said.

Lucas advised residents to stay home, if possible.

Columbia County Emergency Management Director Pam Tucker said crews added two pallets of salt to stocks and replenished supplies of rocks Monday to treat roads and bridges.

Beginning Tuesday night, the temperature will hover around the freezing mark until Thursday when Augusta could begin to thaw out, Proud said. Thursday’s forecast predicts a high in the low 40s.

SCHOOLS OPEN TUESDAY

The Columbia County School System will have a normal school schedule Tuesday. If weather conditions worsen, an early release will be announced and all after-school activities will be canceled. A decision about Wednesday’s school schedule will be announced Tuesday afternoon or evening.

Georgia Regents University and Georgia Regents Medical Center will have a normal workday Tuesday. For university classes scheduled Tuesday evening, a decision will be made by 2 p.m.

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TrulyWorried
16526
Points
TrulyWorried 02/10/14 - 07:41 pm
3
0
No Comments

Let us just hope for the best and stay put if at all possible.

Dixieman
17430
Points
Dixieman 02/11/14 - 09:57 am
4
2
Sleet, snow, sneet, filth, snarf, smurch, slop, frost, fnith...

Dixieman tires of this foul hateful winter weather. The only silver lining is that it reveals global warming/climate change for the big lie that it is. Gimme 10,000 points before spring please!!

nanowerx
1406
Points
nanowerx 02/11/14 - 09:21 am
0
0
want snow, you can keep the ice.

I don't have any real idea either way, but to say there is no climate change because of some cold weather is just as misinformed as saying climate change is happening simply because of some warm weather...

protip: if there is significant climate change in the future, it starts off as higher temperatures, then those higher temps disrupt the flow of cold water to the gulf from the north and warm water to the north from the gulf. When this balance in our oceans is thrown into chaos, an ice age will emerge.

I am not saying this will happen, I am just educating on what happens with significant climate change. You can't point to some snow or ice and do "ah ha! Its cold, that means global warming is a ruse!"

Little Old Lady
8937
Points
Little Old Lady 02/11/14 - 09:27 am
1
0
Climate Change

The climate has been changing since climate began. We are in a warming period between ice ages. In the 70s scientists were telling us an ice age was coming. Now it is global warming, then they called it climate change. Duh.

As I said on another post, I do hope the earth keeps warming while I am on it. I do not like cold weather.

Dixieman
17430
Points
Dixieman 02/11/14 - 10:11 am
2
0
Nanowerx and others:

Temperature goes up, proof of climate change.
Temperature goes down, proof of climate change.
Either way, well-intentioned power hungry leftists demand they be put in charge of the entire global economy as they know what is best for us peons.
I don't buy it.
You have to analyze and believe the following:
1. The climate in -- oh, about 1960, I guess you enviros get to pick the benchmark -- was the perfect ideal and we must immediately get back to it no matter what the cost.
2. The climate is actually changing. Not at all certain. Do you really believe nature is static? Or changing and dynamic?
3. The benefits of climate change (and there are many!) are outweighed by the detriments.
4. The cost of nudging the climate back to the ideal moment is less than the cost of the net detriment calculated in #3 above. (Many living in harsh colder climates would benefit).
5. It is possible for human activity to achieve #4. (One volcano eruption, which will inevitably occur, would undo all the proposed carbon reduction nonsense currently on the agenda).
6. Achieving #4 by changing the global climate is a better economic and social alternative than dealing with specific detrimental effects (i.e. relocating people living near coastlines, planting crops in new areas).
No one who is screaming about climate change has thought any of these things through, and I decline to give them any power to dictate how the world should be run. This is an hysterical and irrational overreaction to normal natural fluctuations. It is actually now an orthodox religion, requiring unquestioning obedience and the sneering at and punishment of heretics, and no longer remotely connected to proper scientific inquiry. (For you history buffs, there are lots of interesting parallels to those who were convinced in the year 999 that the milenium year 1000 would see the world end and Christ return to earth for the Last Judgment and went quite overboard in their conduct.)
So there.

scoopdedoop64
2488
Points
scoopdedoop64 02/11/14 - 10:24 am
2
0
Climate Change Cannot Be Stopped

Its not what we are doing as much as what is going to happen anyway. As the earth rotates the sun is going to get closer and eventually the earth will be destroyed by fire. So worrying about your carbon footprint won't really do much good.

masterpug
6
Points
masterpug 02/11/14 - 11:09 am
0
1
Volcanoes

Dixie, I'm not sure where you are getting your information on volcanoes, but the math doesn't add up. Humans put out an estimated 30 billion tons of CO2 a year, volcanoes only amount to .3 billion (source: http://www.agu.org/pubs/pdf/2011EO240001.pdf).

Anyway, the concern is less about who caused it (though the signs point pretty strongly at us) and more about what we can do to stop it from happening. Unpredictable weather and rising tides = really, really bad.

dichotomy
37534
Points
dichotomy 02/11/14 - 11:51 am
1
0
"then those higher temps

"then those higher temps disrupt the flow of cold water to the gulf from the north and warm water to the north from the gulf. When this balance in our oceans is thrown into chaos, an ice age will emerge. "

And we know this because it has happened before.......before man....before man-made CO2. Yes, climate change happens. And yes volcanos can have a dramatic impact on the climate...not from CO2....but from ash in the atmosphere. They alone can cause a mini ice age.

But the fact of the matter is that you cannot prevent warming, or an ice age, by forcing people to live like they are in the stone age. The world needs, and will continue to use energy and most of it will be carbon based. The climate will continue to change no matter what we do. It may get warmer, colder, or heaven forbid, it may stabilize and the greenie weenies will have to look for something else to crusade about. If the climate changes radically I suggest people either adapt or become mobile.

David Parker
7923
Points
David Parker 02/11/14 - 01:24 pm
0
0
ice fight after school 3

ice fight

after school

3 pm

TODAY

Gage Creed
19417
Points
Gage Creed 02/11/14 - 09:04 pm
0
0
Paging AlGore... please

Paging AlGore... please report to the Akademic Shokalskiy... your chopper is inbound...

Dixieman
17430
Points
Dixieman 02/12/14 - 06:45 am
2
0
masterpug:

Please re-read my post carefully.
1. I deliberately did NOT mention what caused climate change. It does not matter whether people did or not, does it? If climate is changing away from what enviros think is the ideal, we should be trying to stop it according to them no matter what the cause. Screeching that it is man-made is just their way of trying to make folks feel guilty and sign on to their misguided agenda. All that really matters are the items I did list, including whether human activity could reverse climate change - a different issue from what caused it.
2. I am not talking about current volcanic activity, but the effect of one major volcanic eruption, i.e. Mt. Saint Helens, one of the large volcanoes in Indonesia, etc. If a big one blows, it would utterly swamp the effect of anything people try to do.
------------------
"Furthermore, some scientists believe that spectacular volcanic eruptions, like that of Mt. St. Helens in 1980 and Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, actually lead to short-term global cooling, not warming, as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ash and other particles in the air and stratosphere reflect some solar energy instead of letting it into Earth’s atmosphere. SO2, which converts to sulfuric acid aerosol when it hits the stratosphere, can linger there for as long as seven years and can exercise a cooling effect long after a volcanic eruption has taken place.

"Scientists tracking the effects of the major 1991 eruption of the Philippines’ Mt. Pinatubo found that the overall effect of the blast was to cool the surface of the Earth globally by some 0.5 degrees Celsius a year later, even though rising human greenhouse gas emissions and an El Nino event (a warm water current which periodically flows along the coast of Ecuador and Peru in South America) caused some surface warming during the 1991-1993 study period."

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