Broad Street Ramble 10k draws more than 300 runners

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It was going to take a little more than a broken toe and bum heel to keep Karen Ragan from finishing the 36th annual Broad Street Ramble 10k on Saturday.

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Runners make their way to the starting line Saturday for the Broad Street Ramble 10K. The race, started in 1977 by the Augusta Striders Run­ning Club - formerly the Augusta Track Club - benefited the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Augusta for the second year in a row.   JON-MICHAEL SULLIVAN/STAFF
JON-MICHAEL SULLIVAN/STAFF
Runners make their way to the starting line Saturday for the Broad Street Ramble 10K. The race, started in 1977 by the Augusta Striders Run­ning Club - formerly the Augusta Track Club - benefited the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Augusta for the second year in a row.

Shortly after crossing the finish line at Augusta Common, the Grovetown resident had one foot planted on a bag of ice.

“(My heel) is absolutely killing me,” she said. “It started hurting the first step I took. I thought it would subside, but it didn’t. I figured I would just try and quit if it hurt too bad.”

But like the more than 300 other runners, she made it back in time to enjoy the live music and beer that awaited participants.

The race, started in 1977 by the Augusta Striders Run­ning Club, benefited the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Augusta for the second year in a row.

William Caskey, the running club’s president, said it holds three events a year with the purpose of giving back to the community.

“The Augusta Striders has a dual mission,” he said. “It’s to promote running and fitness in general in the CSRA, but also to be a philanthropic organization. We want (the race) to be a meaningful contribution to our community.”
Betts Murdison, the president and CEO of the Au­gus­ta Ronald McDonald House, said the money raised Satur­day will help fund its new $5.8 million building.

With the race so close to Hal­loween, Caskey said runners were encouraged to race in costumes. Prizes were awarded for the best individual and group costumes.

With a thick, gray beard and a red trucker cap, Army Capt. David Anderson trotted his way to a second-place finish. Anderson, dressed in red running shorts and a white T-shirt, was doing his best Forrest Gump impersonation.
“I couldn’t find a beard that was brown, so I’ll have to dye it,” he said while catching his breath.

Though he didn’t place first, Anderson said he was glad to have participated.

“It’s an awesome event,” he said. “I’m glad to have been a part of it. The money goes to a good cause.”

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