Authorities investigate North Augusta fish kill

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Authorities in South Carolina were investigating an apparent fish kill at North Augusta’s Brick Pond Park.

The event, which involved about 40 fish, is likely to be weather related, said Tonya Bontatibus, the executive director of Savannah Riverkeeper.

Periods of hot, then cool weather, interspersed with heavy cold rains, can cause a sudden loss of oxygen in ponds or streams, which in turn can result in a fish kill, said Georgia Wildlife Resources fisheries biologist Ed Bettross.

Bettross said he is aware of similar die-offs in Georgia in recent months.

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Little Lamb
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Little Lamb 08/19/13 - 10:39 pm
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I don't buy it

Cold water, especially fueled by cold rainfall, produces increases in dissolved oxygen levels in creeks, streams, ponds, puddles, rivers, etc. The published explanation is a whitewash.

Besides, why are they consulting Georgia biologists for a South Carolina event?

Little Lamb
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Little Lamb 08/19/13 - 10:25 pm
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betty

From the story:

Bettross said he is aware of similar die-offs in Georgia in recent months.

Yeah, like the one up there in Betty's Branch a couple of weeks ago. That was a whitewash, too.

bdouglas
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bdouglas 08/19/13 - 10:27 pm
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@LL

The quote was from a Georgia Wildlife Resources rep, not the investigation. First sentence says "Authorities in South Carolina were investigating ..."

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/20/13 - 12:26 am
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Cold weather and oxygen

LL is right. Cold water causes increased oxygen levels. But if water stratification is present, it is possible for the surface water, which is usually warmer, to contain more oxygen. In this case, a cool front with cold rain could cause a fish kill. Or it could be some type of pollutant, bacteria or algae.

Bodhisattva
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Bodhisattva 08/20/13 - 06:51 am
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If it's a heavily residential

If it's a heavily residential area, periods of heavy rainfall cause e. coli levels (due to pets) plus chemical levels due to lawn and garden fertilizer/herbicides/and insecticides to increase dramatically. You would think rain would dilute the amounts but, in todays world, it's just the opposite due to the amounts that are present. At least that's where the conversation turned recently during a monsoon like storm while camping at the lake with a buddy who has his graduate degree in agronomy, and who had just finished reading a study about it. I'll take his word for it. He's done field study on soil science for over 30 years and is over all a pretty smart fellow.

etlinks
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etlinks 08/20/13 - 07:15 am
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Lets see what effect project

Lets see what effect project jackson has on the ponds.

corgimom
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corgimom 08/20/13 - 07:21 am
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And sometimes, fish just die.

And sometimes, fish just die.

Little Lamb
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Little Lamb 08/20/13 - 07:56 am
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Wise

Corgimom makes a wise comment, so I'll give her a thumbs up to counteract the two thumbs down up there.

Sometimes, fish just die. You don't need to have a government-financed study every time there are dead fish observed.

seenitB4
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seenitB4 08/20/13 - 08:05 am
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Fish just die

Is that why the dolphins beach themselves?

GnipGnop
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GnipGnop 08/20/13 - 08:13 am
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Add a aerator

Not sure why any pond doesn't have one...

Bizkit
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Bizkit 08/20/13 - 08:48 am
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Bod is correct storm water

Bod is correct storm water runoff from urban development produces large amounts of pollution (people always worry about agricultural)-the rapid runoff also affects the hydrological cycle because water runs off and doesn't penetrate the soil too. These pollutions will affect the balance of bacteria and viruses (viruses outnumber bacteria and kill off half each day which is good but too much is bad) which affect algae or protist like dinoflagellates that produce toxins. Growing up on the Gulf Coast I noted more frequent and more devastating fish and dolphin kills which were just attributed to red tide without any study-but I had never seen so many dolphins die.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/20/13 - 09:50 am
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Golf courses are notorious

Golf courses are notorious for producing toxic run-off.

Watermedic
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Watermedic 08/20/13 - 02:38 pm
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The cooler influent water

The cooler influent water temps caused the pond to "turn over". The upper strata being cooler and more dense than the lower strata causes them to flip. With the cooler temps and less sunlight, algae doesnt produce the normal amounts of oxygen. So when the pond turns over, the dissolved oxygen is reduced to levels where some fish die.

Watermedic
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Watermedic 08/20/13 - 02:40 pm
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So the answer is "Yes" it is

So the answer is "Yes" it is weather related.

Gage Creed
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Gage Creed 08/20/13 - 06:34 pm
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Sounds like Claude and the

Sounds like Claude and the Game Warden may have been fishin' at the Brick Pond...

gargoyle
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gargoyle 08/20/13 - 07:14 pm
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What Watermedic said ...A

What Watermedic said ...A pond rolling happens more often than most think usually in the fall but can happen anytime. With the temp drop we had last week and a cold rain that would be the first place to look.

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