Islamic Society of Augusta fills mosque to celebrate end of Ramadan

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Fasting turned to feasting for hundreds of Muslims gathered Thursday morning to celebrate the end of Islam’s holy month.

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Women bow their heads during morning prayer while celebrating Eid al-Fitr, the end of of Islam's holy month of Ramadan. This is the first year the Islamic Society of Augusta has held the festival at its community center, which opened last October.  EMILY ROSE BENNETT/STAFF
EMILY ROSE BENNETT/STAFF
Women bow their heads during morning prayer while celebrating Eid al-Fitr, the end of of Islam's holy month of Ramadan. This is the first year the Islamic Society of Augusta has held the festival at its community center, which opened last October.

Eid al-Fitr, the Festival of Fast-Breaking that marks the end of Ramadan, was an occasion for praying, eating and community-building at the Islamic Society of Augusta’s community center in Martinez.

“Ramadan was about self-restraint,” Imam Jamal Daoudi told the congregation during his sermon that followed prayer. “To discipline yourself in something minor so during the year you can discipline yourself in something bigger.”

During Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunup to sundown. Celebrating Eid al-Fitr “revives the life of the heart,” Daoudi said.

The crowd filled the mosque’s prayer space, which can accommodate 500 people, and women and children overflowed onto the indoor basketball courts. The mosque, which opened last October, was designed with room for growth and for large groups on holy days.

Last year on Eid al-Fitr, the festival was held at the community’s former mosque after construction delays postponed the opening of the new mosque in time for the end of Ramadan. The old mosque was so full that some arrived an hour early to get a spot and others waited outside in the rain for their chance to eat.

“It’s a lot more space. You don’t have to worry about if you get here late you will be out in the parking lot praying,” said Ayesha Ahmed, of Evans.

With more room, prayer isn’t disrupted by ambient noise, and there is more airflow to help the mosque stay cool, Ahmed said.

Ismail Kadur, of Martinez, said the Eid festival was a reminder of the vibrant community that responds to the invitation to prayer.

“You love to see it (the mosque) filled. Any place of worship you like to see it full,” he said. “Otherwise, it becomes just a building.”

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rmwhitley
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rmwhitley 08/08/13 - 05:27 pm
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Dadgum it.
Unpublished

Had it on my calender and missed it.

ragingbull
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ragingbull 08/08/13 - 06:14 pm
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Well, there you have it. And

Well, there you have it. And to think we Christians can not even have prayer in public schools. If we built a large building and a lot of people knelt and prayed outside the building, I am sure the only coverage we would receive is when the police responded when a complaint was filed.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/08/13 - 06:27 pm
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I'm glad it's over, too. :)

I'm glad it's over, too. :)

Truth Matters
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Truth Matters 08/09/13 - 05:12 am
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Hyperbole....

In fact, I see many Christian groups praying and worshipping outside. Most commonly for Easter Sunrise service. I have never heard of anyone calling in a complaint about that activity.

Also, there is Christian programming on TV 24/7; a listing of worship services in the Saturday paper; almost all are Christian.

Let's not see problems where there are none.

Bodhisattva
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Bodhisattva 08/09/13 - 06:01 am
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There you have it. One of the

There you have it. One of the major problem with many modern Christians. They are vastly in the majority. Work schedules, school, most holidays are geared to their religion, but unless everyone is forced to see, hear, and be exposed to nothing but their religion they whine that they are persecuted. Read the religion section. It's well over 90% Christian. Drive around and in some areas there are more churches than convenience stores, all Christian. Christian youth have the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, "See You at thee Pole" where students gather around the flag pole and pray before school, and many other religious opportunities in school. What they can't do is force ALL students to be subjected to sectarian prayer and religion, as well they shouldn't. All people have the right to practice their religion in this country. None should be forced to participate, or be in a captive situation where those around them participate, in a religion that is not their own. Just as you or I would not want to be forced to participate in a Muslim religious ceremony, they, a Buddhist, a Hindu, or one from any other religion, may not want to participate in a Christian service. Keep it at church or in your home, not at school or the workplace where there is a captive audience.

corgimom
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corgimom 08/09/13 - 08:10 am
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Another so-called Christian.

Another so-called Christian.

When he talks about "we Christians", let me just say not to include me in that narrow-minded, prejudiced, bigoted, anything-but-Christian "we".

geecheeriverman
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geecheeriverman 08/09/13 - 10:14 am
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FRONT PAGE NEWS

OK to print this article, but it is not front page news. I can not remember when a Christian celebration or activity was on the front page.

rmwhitley
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rmwhitley 08/09/13 - 02:26 pm
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Christianity,
Unpublished

to my knowledge, does not openly worship to KILL the infidels.

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