Shiloh Comprehensive Community Center to provide classes for displaced 15th Street residents

Friday, July 26, 2013 5:29 PM
Last updated 10:44 PM
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To help smooth the transition to new homes, residents along 15th Street including tenants of Cherry Tree Crossing can get free counseling and education services from Shiloh Comprehensive Community Center.

The educational program is designed to help individuals and families who will be displaced when Augusta Housing Authority vacates Cherry Tree Crossing before demolishing the public housing project. Additionally, a small number of residents in the area could be affected by a Georgia Department of Transportation plan to widen 15th Street from two to four lanes.

“You’ve got to have a plan to relocate,” said Shiloh’s executive director, Elizabeth Jones.

Because many Cherry Tree Crossing residents will choose to take Section 8 vouchers, the classes will coach individuals on new responsibilities that come with moving from public housing to regular neighborhoods, Jones said. Residents need to be familiar with responsibilities such as maintaining landscaping, caring for a house or apartment and paying rent and bills.

“We are going to talk to them about what it takes to be a good neighbor,” she said. “When people transition into neighborhoods, we want them to be a part of the neighborhood and not a problem in the neighborhood.”

Additionally, the classes will help individuals make informed choices about employment before moving to a new location, Jones said. Residents need to make sure there are employers nearby and they have sufficient access to public transportation if needed.

The first phase of classes begins Sept. 9 and will continue throughout the area’s redevelopment process beginning at different times as needed, Jones said.

The 15th Street corridor has been the focus of the Augusta Sustainable Development Implementation Program, a $1.8 million study addressing affordable housing, jobs, commercial development and transportation in a large section of Augusta’s urban core.

The sustainable development program is ahead of schedule and under budget, said John Paul Stout, the city’s sustainable development manager. U.S. Housing and Urban Development funds totaling $70,000 were redirected to provide the services at Shiloh.

“The success rate of people who have grown up in public housing and make the transition to Section 8 housing has been historically very low, not just in Augusta but nationwide,” Stout said.

Augusta Housing Authority also provides one-on-one counseling services with its tenants before and during relocation, said the director of resident services, Buddy Oldfield.

If the resident wants to use a Section 8 voucher, the housing authority will show them housing options where the voucher can be used.

“A person is going to be assigned to you from the time we start relocating you until the time you are settled,” Oldfield said.

SIGN UP

Registration for relocation classes and counseling at Shiloh Comprehensive Community Center begins Monday. Complete an application at the center, 1635 15th St., Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.

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Little Lamb
46022
Points
Little Lamb 07/26/13 - 09:14 pm
4
1
You Can Say That Again

From the story:

“The success rate of people who have grown up in public housing and make the transition to Section 8 housing has been historically very low, not just in Augusta but nationwide,” said John Paul Stout, Augusta’s sustainable development manager.

Funny, I didn't read Susan McCord’s story on the hiring of a new sustainable development director. Ol’ Fred can bring in all kinds of new directors and coordinators and supervisors now that there is a new personnel manual in place that allows him to hire whomever he wants whenever he wants.

Friends, Augusta taxpayers are in for a downward spiral.

Augustaisdying
526
Points
Augustaisdying 07/27/13 - 02:13 am
0
0
Yeah, right.
Unpublished

They don't want to work.

Spread the thugs all over Augusta, and waste tax dollars on trying to get them to think of something other than spinning rims and the crack pipe.

Good luck with that.

Augusta = Detroit.

mosovich
805
Points
mosovich 07/27/13 - 08:08 am
3
1
“The success rate of people

“The success rate of people who have grown up in public housing and make the transition to Section 8 housing has been historically very low, not just in Augusta but nationwide,” Stout said.

Of course it's low.. You're taking people that have basically had to have no responsibility because everyone else is providing everything for them and expecting them over night to know how to do everything..

Riverman1
84068
Points
Riverman1 07/27/13 - 08:37 am
4
0
Wrong Kind of Classes

Classes to help people know how to live in their Section 8 houses. I’d feel better if they were having classes to teach people how to get out of public housing, no matter the name of it.

sassylassie
455
Points
sassylassie 07/27/13 - 10:53 am
3
0
These classes should be

These classes should be mandatory-and conclude with the individual developing a plan to get themselves and their family out of public housing within 6 months. The gimme mentality has got to end. Our country is on the verge of going where Detroit is now.

willie7
955
Points
willie7 07/27/13 - 10:57 am
0
0
I know the people from Cherry
Unpublished

I know the people from Cherry Tree Crossing are coming to South Augusta.
And I know some people who plan to leave and move to Columbia County.
South Augusta will become a haven for Section Eight residents.

corgimom
32532
Points
corgimom 07/27/13 - 10:57 am
2
3
There aren't enough jobs in

There aren't enough jobs in Augusta for them to get off public housing.

Let me repeat that.

There aren't enough jobs in Augusta for them to get off public housing.

They aren't going to get off of public housing.

There aren't enough jobs in the US. There just aren't.

sassylassie
455
Points
sassylassie 07/27/13 - 11:55 am
3
0
This is the way I see

This is the way I see it;
There are a lot of jobs in this area that people don't want to do, and many people are looking for jobs that they only want to do, when the reality is that there are times we may have to take a job that we need to do in order to provide for our families. Sometimes a job is a stepping stone to a better- paying position and individuals who CAN work NEED to work to do what they have to do to provide for their families and get off the handout rolls.
Not all of our jobs are perfect , or where we thought we might be at this point in our lives, but to move into other positions, sometimes we have to take those jobs that are less than ideal.
I think far too many beggars are being choosy when the reality is that there are jobs available- but no one wants to take them.
My example is that I travel frequently and have noticed that in some cities, the hotel housekeepers, especially at more of the upscale hotels in larger cities, aren't African American or Caucasian, they are Hispanic. The trend seems to be and I have heard from hotel managers that no one else WANTS those positions but Hispanic women , and they are lined up to take those jobs and work their tails off to keep them. They are doing what they have to do to provide for their chores. And many of them, believe it or not, work 2 shifts between different hotels. Interesting. And other people say they can't find a job and I believe it's because it's not really the job they want. I know this is not the case for everyone-- just good for thought...

sassylassie
455
Points
sassylassie 07/27/13 - 11:58 am
1
0
I was trying to say provide

I was trying to say provide for their families- pardon the typo

Sweet son
10406
Points
Sweet son 07/27/13 - 01:21 pm
3
0
There ARE jobs available and the operative word is "job."

These entitlement people don't want a job because it will require them to work which is something they know nothing about. The Cherry Tree people are in most cases some elderly that came up through the system and can't actually work. They should not be given Section 8 housing because they won't be able to keep up a residence.

Then there are the other Cherry Tree residents who are predominately female with multiple children who won't work. They don't want to work and they won't! They too should not be given Section 8 housing. You can't train someone to be a good neighbor if they are unwilling to put a little effort in! They will lay up in the house and watch a big screen TV and talk on an Obama cellphone just like they did in the project. They will overload the house with multiple families to increase the household income. The adult females will attract males who have only one thing on their minds.

Don't think I know what I'm talking about? There is a Section 8 house across the street from my parents and I know full well what goes on! Renters come and go about every two to three months and myparents never know what will come next. Most often it has not been good!

I am not going to take up for whites either when it comes to 'real' work. They too will not do the manual labor jobs that is why when you see someone in a job that requires their muscles in this day and time it will be a Hispanic person. They will work!!

No easy answers here and I wish these folks no ill will but the place most suited would be in another project because that is what they know. I also know this is not possible because project housing is not available.

corgimom
32532
Points
corgimom 07/27/13 - 01:58 pm
1
4
The unemployment rate in

The unemployment rate in Augusta is over 9%.

The poverty rate in Augusta is over 23%.

There AREN'T ENOUGH JOBS in Augusta, it has nothing to do with wanting to work.

When you add to that a very big county with a woefully inadequate transit system, this is what you get.

Look in the Sunday AC tomorrow. See how many jobs are listed.

Augusta is becoming a county of call centers and fast-food restaurants, and they can only hire so many people. Look around you. See how many "help wanted" signs there are. There aren't nearly enough to absorb all the unemployed. The entry-level jobs are paying minimum wage, that tells you right there that there are too many workers, too few jobs. Whenever you see lots and lots of low-paying jobs, you will see a big unemployed labor pool.

That's another thing- results don't lie.

It used to be, back in the 60's and 70's, there were jobs and you could find work. Not any more.

corgimom
32532
Points
corgimom 07/27/13 - 02:00 pm
2
0
Sweet son, get your parents

Sweet son, get your parents out of there as soon as you can. I am serious, it's not going to get better, and it will get worse.

I'm ok with someone being on Section 8- but then it becomes a halfway house for boyfriends, sons, uncles, cousins, nephews, friends, and friends of friends that have just gotten out of prison or are going back to prison (and sometimes they are one and the same.)

Sweet son
10406
Points
Sweet son 07/27/13 - 04:33 pm
3
0
@corgimom

Thanks for your concern for my parents! I really, sincerely really mean it! They bought their house in 1963 so around Christmas time they will have lived there for 50 years. You know as well as I parents in their 80s will not welcome a son suggesting that they move. Also, my Mom in particular understands the danger and is ever vigilant to situations occurring across the street.

Your description: "halfway house for boyfriends, sons, uncles, cousins, nephews, friends, and friends of friends that have just gotten out of prison or are going back to prison (and sometimes they are one and the same" is right on the money when it comes to the males I've see around. And, you are also right about it not getting any better. I just hope that the good Lord will take care of them until he welcomes them into His kingdom.

I can tell you got my point regarding moving from the "hood"/project to Section 8 will place these people in an unknown world with responsibilities which they have never had and will ultimately ignore.

Of course you know that they live in South Augusta in one of the last decent neighborhoods there. As the last old folks pass away it will also be like the rest of the South part of the county.

It always seems that countyman and all of his knowledge is saying great things about the Southside but I think that even he lives in Columbia County.

I love my Southside roots but that area is continuing to be lost to crime and violence and like Tara will soon be Gone With the Wind!

Sweet son.

Shortcomment
1163
Points
Shortcomment 07/27/13 - 05:25 pm
2
0
Hate to be cold about this but, 2 things.

1. More classes of the educational, in some cases, might have helped, in some cases, to avoid being there to begin with.

2. What is the class to entail?
It is just fill in the blanks on a form.
a. Sign/print your name here._______
b. Enter your Obama Phone # here. ________
c. Enter # number people in house minus boyfriend(s) here . ______
d. Enter Date we can move you here. _______
e. Do you need Benefit Updating assistance? yes/no

Shortcomment
1163
Points
Shortcomment 07/27/13 - 05:42 pm
2
0
corgimom
32532
Points
corgimom 07/27/13 - 06:57 pm
0
0
sweet son, I lived in a

sweet son, I lived in a low-income project. I was nearly shot in a drive-by shooting while getting my mail out of my mailbox, in broad daylight. Bullets don't have people's names on them.

Those criminals use guns like we use Q-Tips.

Your parents could get shot, nothing is worth that. And if they are elderly, I can guarantee you that somebody is watching them and thinking about how to rob them, they just haven't gotten around to it yet. They are very vulnerable, especially if one of them becomes bedridden or is hospitalized. And make no mistake, their house IS being watched, every day.

If they insist on staying, buy them a shotgun for every room, put an alarm system in their home, and a huge vicious dog. Fence in the entire property and have the dog run free. Two dogs are even better than one. The criminals are lazy trash and don't like to get bit.

Now, I'll worry about them, and I know you do too.
*sigh*

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