Hundreds gather in Augusta to protest Zimmerman verdict

Saturday, July 20, 2013 8:44 PM
Last updated Sunday, July 21, 2013 6:17 PM
  • Follow Latest News

Dozens stood at the corner of Wal­ton Way and James Brown Bou­le­vard on Saturday with neon-colored signs with “Stop the violence” scrawled across them in black ink.

Back | Next
Earl Sinkler (center), of Augusta, joins other Travyon Martin supporters at the corner of Walton Way and James Brown Boulevard after the Trayvon Martin After-the-Verdict Rally, which was held at the John H. Ruffin Jr. Courthouse. Sinkler said he wanted to show his support for the Martin family. "I can sympathize with them; I can empathize with them," he said.   JON-MICHAEL SULLIVAN/STAFF
JON-MICHAEL SULLIVAN/STAFF
Earl Sinkler (center), of Augusta, joins other Travyon Martin supporters at the corner of Walton Way and James Brown Boulevard after the Trayvon Martin After-the-Verdict Rally, which was held at the John H. Ruffin Jr. Courthouse. Sinkler said he wanted to show his support for the Martin family. "I can sympathize with them; I can empathize with them," he said.

Behind them, a crowd of several hundred was forming at the footsteps of the Augusta-Richmond Coun­ty Judicial Center for a rally called for after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

“Although we respect the jurisprudence decision, this nation as a whole is protesting the outcome based on the fact a young man was shot and killed,” Charles J. Smith Sr., the president of Augusta’s NAACP branch, told the crowd. “This is why we feel like (Zimmer­man) should have been found guilty.”

Speakers took turns at the microphone, standing in the shadow of the Lady Justice statue.

Shirley Nixon, of Augusta, navigated the crowd with voter registration cards tucked under one arm. She carried a megaphone in the other, reminding attendees that voting is one way to make a difference. Nixon said 50 people had registered to vote by noon.

“If they register to vote, they can have a say in what goes on,” she said.

Across the way, ralliers pushed through the crowd to buy shirts displaying a picture of a hooded Martin. Neichole Wimberly, of Au­gusta, said the shirts, which resemble a boxing poster, show the verdict was only round No. 1 of the fight for justice, with round No. 2 requiring support from the community.

“I don’t feel like nobody – white, black, Puerto Rican – should walk free after committing a crime,” said Wimberly, who was selling the shirts. “Somebody has to do something. Somebody has to push the laws.”

Christa Freeman, a law student from Augusta, said the rally was meant to call on the support of the community and to address issues at home so that other such incidents won’t happen in the future.

“Trayvon is a child of America, not just black America,” she said. “Today is just a start, of course. The verdict was just announced last Saturday, so we are just now starting to mobilize.”

Shari Collier, whose 27-year-old son was slain in 2010, said she can sympathize with Martin’s family. She said she hopes the rally will bring justice for everyone.

“This is not a black issue,” Collier said. “This is a people issue.”

At a community forum at Wil­liams Memorial Christian Metho­dist Episcopal Church, eight panelists covered topics from Florida’s “stand your ground” law to involvment in the Augusta community.

Tubman Education Center Prin­ci­pal Wayne Frazier, one of the panelists, challenged parents to take a more active role in the lives of their children.

“We profile our own children,” he said. “How do you think other people are going to feel when we profile our own children? We’re trying to get our children to do things we don’t do.”

After being recognized by a few members in the crowd, state Sen. Har­die Davis made his way to the front to offer some final thoughts.

“I don’t run from issues like this,” he said. “Where do we go from here? What are you going to do about it? It’s going to take you rolling up your sleeves in this community.”

Comments (77) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
corgimom
36778
Points
corgimom 07/21/13 - 03:11 pm
3
4
"A person that becomes

"A person that becomes immediately paranoid that an individual is suspicious, simply because he is a young black man, does not belong in jail. He belongs in a mental institution."

My son was racially profiled by the Columbia police because he was white in a black area. I had to show ID to the Columbia police because I didn't look like I fit in, at the low-income, 99% black housing development that I lived in. I guess by that theory, the Columbia police belong in a mental institution.

The bigger concepts in this are not being addressed. What isn't being addressed is that people are so afraid of being crime victims, they have to have Neighborhood Watches. People have to patrol neighborhoods on their own, to prevent burglaries. They have to ask strangers what they are doing in a neighborhood, because they know there aren't enough police to suppress crime

Our homeowner association recently issued private decals to be put on our cars, so that the Char-Meck PD could tell what cars belonged in our neighborhood and which ones didn't. We have Section 8 housing not far from us, and homes in our area are being broken into.

It has gotten to the point that any stranger, anywhere, is presumed to be suspicious, because crime has gotten so out of hand. Because the drug problem has gotten so bad, that no neighborhood is safe, anymore.

This could've happened anywhere in the US.

You see all the posters on here that talk about they are armed at all times, because they don't want to be a crime victim. They are the next George Zimmermans.

It IS going to happen again. And again. And again.

Burninator, I don't know where you live, but if they tear down a Federal housing project and move them all out near where you live, you are going to be suspicious of every stranger too. Trust me on this.

Florida is one giant drug market surrounded on 3 sides by water. And it's going to get that bad in Augusta in just a few years.

Until you've lived in a high-crime area, until you've had to install an alarm system in your home in order to keep what little you have, until you've had to look out your window to make sure the crackheads aren't around to mug you when you walk to your car, you really can't understand that kind of worry. It's like living under siege.

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 03:18 pm
3
1
burninator

Another person completely confused on what "Stalking" actually is!!

Question: Is a Private Investigator, hired by my wife to follow and take pictures of me, "stalking" me?

Will ANYONE answer this simply question?

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 03:27 pm
3
3
"that he followed the teen,

"that he followed the teen, got into a confrontation with the teen and shot the teen dead."

Let's not forget the fact Zimmerman, was shown to be truthful on the lie detector when he stated he DID NOT initiate contact with Martin!! But that wouldn't fit your agenda, would it?

"Trayvon stood his ground against a stalking, armed stranger, and was murdered. Zimmerman's little baby cuts and little bloody nose, probably the result of his clumsy-looking self falling over his own two feet, does not justify shooting that child in cold blood."

Do you have EVIDENCE on any of this? The prosecution sure didn't, so I'm wondering if you withheld evidence pertinent to the case?? Do you HONESTLY believe Martion would have attacked a man, with fists, that he KNEW had a firearm? No, he wouldn't!! MY OPINION is, he probably thought he could beat the crap out of this "Weird Cracker" that was following him, and he attempted to do so.

Love how you guys play words games, using "Chased, Stalked". Then saying "little bloody nose" when his nose injury was diagnosed as a "Closed fracture". Wow, little bloody nose, huh? It's also pathetic that you guys keep referring to him as a child. A 6'02 180 lbs man is QUITE A CHILD!!! A child capable of causing a "closed fracture" to a grown man's nose!!

Did you know Georgia considers 17 years old an ADULT!!! So, keep up the nice word games!!!

InChristLove
22481
Points
InChristLove 07/21/13 - 03:47 pm
3
2
"If the mere sight of a young

"If the mere sight of a young black man elicits such paranoia in you that you feel the need to stalk and confront him while carrying deadly force, you need professional mental help."

Some seem to dismissed evidence in the case that Zimmerman DID NOT STALK OR CONFRONT Trayvon.

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 04:11 pm
3
4
You can't rationalize with

You can't rationalize with these people!! It gets very old having to PROVE their lies with TRUTH; looking up the legal definition of stalking, force, unlawful force, etc. But, I believe we've proven every lie they've told as just that, lies!! For more proof, go to yesterday's thread about the Zimmerman case. I don't feel like posting all the links and definitions at this time!!

Bottom line: Martin was NOT stalked, not chased, not placed in REASONABLE fear for his life, not confronted or contacted, not assaulted!! As a matter of FACT, which was proven in COURT; Martin did the initial confronting AND assaulting!! You fellas have a nice day and try not to let TRUTH, explode your brain!!

SWIRES
33
Points
SWIRES 07/21/13 - 04:16 pm
3
1
Why is the media stirring

Why is the media stirring this up ..You had an article about this yesterday.. Anything for a story..Shame.

palmetto1008
9782
Points
palmetto1008 07/21/13 - 04:22 pm
2
4
Just for argument's sake, the
Unpublished

Just for argument's sake, the word stalk can be used without reference to the legal definition of stalk(ing). Just as "self-defense" can be uttered without rising to the level required for a defense in a court of law. (And, by the way, no specific reference to the current case should be inferred.)

Little Lamb
47986
Points
Little Lamb 07/21/13 - 04:40 pm
3
2
Just a word

Yes, I guess you can use the word stalk outside of the legal context. But just as Specsta used the word stalk, he also used the word murder. He said that Zimmerman murdered Martin. I guess he was using that word murder outside of the legal context.

We're living in Wonderland, where words mean whatever the speaker means at any given time; thus no standards by which the rest of society can go by.

Darby
28388
Points
Darby 07/21/13 - 04:52 pm
5
4
"The outrage at the verdict stems from the

fact that Trayvon's murder could have been any one of our sons. And the murderer is a free man."

.
No, the outrage stems from the fact that in this crazy upside down world there are still people who call self defense murder.

If you want to shake your head at that, go ahead. It won't change anything.

There was only ONE law broken that night. When the thug Trayvon assaulted what he THOUGHT was an unarmed man, he broke the law. In effect, Trayvon killed himself.

THE ESTABLISHED FACTS:

(1) Zimmerman carried a concealed weapon. (No law broken there.)

(2) Zimmerman was a member of his neighborhood watch team. (No law broken there.)

(3) Zimmerman followed someone in his neighborhood that he did not recognize. (No law broken there.)

(4) Martin, when he noticed someone following him, could have elected to go home, but didn't. (No law broken there.)

(5) Martin decided to lay in wait and confront the individual who was following him. (No law broken there.)

(6) Martin inexplicably decided to sucker punch his follower in the nose, then bash his head into the concrete. (All sort of laws broken there.)

(7) Zimmerman manages to wrest his weapon from it's holster and defend himself before he is to pass into unconsciousness. (No law broken there.)

.
Someone once said: We are all entitled to our own opinion. None of us are entitled to our own set of facts.

kiwiinamerica
961
Points
kiwiinamerica 07/21/13 - 04:47 pm
0
0
Show trial
Unpublished

Zimmerman's trial was nothing more than a show trial brought about by political pressure and mob rule. The cops had it right from the start.

oldredneckman96
5115
Points
oldredneckman96 07/21/13 - 04:51 pm
5
4
Criminals
Unpublished

Criminals will not rest until they can roam and rob without fear of an armed citizen protecting the fabric of our Constitution. Since "Stand Your Ground" laws are in the fabric of out Constitution, it does not matter what a State does or does not do about it. I do not have to run to protect myself! If I bring Skittles to a gunfight, that would be my bad decision, one I will not make. The first thing I bring is good manners taught to me by my parents. That has served me well for over 60 years, too bad Martins parents did not teach that.

Darby
28388
Points
Darby 07/21/13 - 05:26 pm
4
3
Just remember folks, outrage and runaway

emotions, combined with contempt for the law are the long established hallmarks of vigilantism.

And that's all we're seeing today from the would be "defenders" of Trayvon Martin.

Little Lamb
47986
Points
Little Lamb 07/21/13 - 05:25 pm
4
3
Debate

When you are debating, you try to make your debating points respond to the topic and to counter debate points of your opponent. I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around this debating point from specsta:

You guys still don't get it. The outrage at the verdict stems from the fact that Trayvon's murder could have been any one of our sons.

Couldn't the victim of any murder be the son of anybody? When you generalize everything, you lose any meaningfulness.

Thus, the outrage is pointless and needs to stop.

specsta
6775
Points
specsta 07/21/13 - 06:49 pm
3
3
Still A Minor

myfather15 wrote - "Did you know Georgia considers 17 years old an ADULT!!! So, keep up the nice word games!!!"

Hmmm...I don't know ANY 17-year-olds that can legally sign a binding contract, perform in an adult film, buy cigarettes, register to vote, cast a vote, work on dangerous jobs, gamble, buy a firearm, or serve on a jury.

The ONLY place where a 17-year-old can be considered an adult is in the criminal justice system when overzealous prosecutors try minors as adults for crimes.

Now who's playing "word games"?

specsta
6775
Points
specsta 07/21/13 - 06:56 pm
4
3
@ Little Lamb

Any one of our sons, or daughters as well, could have gone to a convenience store, bought candy and tea, and walked home in the rain. That's the common thread in this.

No parent expects their child to be murdered - simply because they looked "suspicious" by a trigger-happy Barney Fife, who ignored the instructions of the police department to leave the kid alone and not follow him.

Little Lamb
47986
Points
Little Lamb 07/21/13 - 07:29 pm
2
1
Mush

Martin was shot (not murdered) for banging Zimmerman's head into the concrete. If it had continued, Zimmerman would have lost consciousness.

Of course, if you believe Martin's friend, Rachel Jeantel, Zimmerman should have intuitively understood that Martin was merely giving Zimmerman a "whoop a**" and was not going to beat him into a coma. Zimmerman should have intuitively understood Martin's gangsta culture, even though Zimmerman was not a part of that culture. He wasn't a cop; he was merely a cop wannabe, and cop wannabes have not had the training to understand gangsta culture.

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 07:39 pm
2
2
Well specsta; if a 17 year

Well specsta; if a 17 year old commits a criminal offense, they're charged as an ADULT and go to adult jail!! They are no longer considered to be in the juvenile system. How is that playing word games? They actually ARE considered and adult!! Simply because they can't do SOME of the things you listed, doesn't mean they aren't adult. I personally believe a person shouldn't be considered an adult until their 25 and have got all their stupid mistakes behind them. Well, at least with the misdemeanor criminal history. They should have a clean slate at 25 or misdemeanors (just an opinion).

Back to the point; I wasn't playing word games. It's not like I'm calling a 6'02 180 pound, muscular man a "Child". What standard are you using to refer to him as a child? If you use a mother's standard, he is still HER child at 40!! If you use the criminal justice system of Georgia, he is an adult at 17. There are MANY standards you could use in qualifying someone as a CHILD!!

The truth is, and you know it, but won't admit it; is that Trayvon Martin was NOT a child!! But saying a "Child was murdered" takes on a much deeper meaning!! And YES, a 17 year old CAN join the Military and that is a pretty good standard when judging if their a child!!

southern2
7087
Points
southern2 07/21/13 - 08:03 pm
2
1
Bet state of Fla is happy

Bet state of Fla is happy with the Rev Jackson's decesion to call for a state boycott. Remember when South Carolina was boycotted? Tourism increased and related revenue actually rose. Maybe GA can get the Rev to do us the same favor.

palmetto1008
9782
Points
palmetto1008 07/21/13 - 08:04 pm
1
0
37 states and the District of
Unpublished

37 states and the District of Columbia, including Florida, the juvenile court has jurisdiction until the age of 18

corgimom
36778
Points
corgimom 07/21/13 - 08:15 pm
1
1
Specsta, since a 19 or 20

Specsta, since a 19 or 20 year old can't legally buy liquor or a pistol, does that mean that they aren't adults, either?

corgimom
36778
Points
corgimom 07/21/13 - 08:21 pm
0
1
Question: Is a Private

Question: Is a Private Investigator, hired by my wife to follow and take pictures of me, "stalking" me?

They can only take pictures of you from what they see when they are on public property. They can follow you into a restaurant or the lobby of a motel; they cannot follow you into the room that you rent.

A licensed investigator does not intend harm to you; they are not trying to injure you. They cannot threaten your safety.

They have very strict regulations as to what they can and cannot do, and no, they are not stalking you.

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 08:27 pm
0
0
palmetto

I won't argue about that; but what is your point?

Do you consider a 6'02 180 pound individual an actual "Child"? In what aspect? Maybe mental capacity, but certainly not in physical stature!! Why can't people just call him what he was, a teenager? Because that wouldn't sound as vicious as "murdering a child" now would it?

Who cares how many States consider 18 an adult? My point is to say that SOME States, including Georgia consider a 17 year old an adult, in certain aspects. So at the least, it's certainly NOT clear that Trayvon was a "child"? We can play these word games all day, but the fact is, in a physical altercation, a 6'02 180 pound individual is VERY capable of inflicting serious bodily harm, as TM did and was PROVEN in the trial!!

InChristLove
22481
Points
InChristLove 07/21/13 - 08:31 pm
0
0
(specsta) No parent expects

(specsta) No parent expects their child to be murdered - simply because they looked "suspicious" by a trigger-happy Barney Fife, who ignored the instructions of the police department to leave the kid alone and not follow him.
Problem is specsta, neither you, nor I, nor anyone else knows for a fact that Zimmerman following Trayvon after the dispatcher SUGGESTED that he didn’t need to follow Trayvon. Notice the testimony specsta…dispatcher said “make suggestions”. Dispatcher testimony stated:

“Noffke asked him in which direction Martin was running. After we hear the sound of door chimes and wind, we hear Noffke say, "Are you following him?" Zimmerman says yes, and Noffke replies, "OK, we don't need you to do that." Noffke testified that, because of liability concerns, police dispatchers are trained to make suggestions to callers rather than issue commands. In any event, Zimmerman says "OK" in response to Noffke's suggestion. While defense attorney Mark O'Mara suggested that Zimmerman stopped at that point, the prosecution's theory seems to be that Zimmerman continued pursuing Martin.

There is no proof either way, so if there is no proof, there is no evidence. You can believe what you think you know, you can spout your theory, but in the end….it’s all an opinion and court trials are not based (or shouldn’t be based) on opinion but evidence and facts.

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 08:35 pm
0
0
Corgimom

Thanks for the response, and it was a VERY good one. But you've been very rational on this topic, so I was hoping for one of the clear TM supporters to answer it.

But, you're right. They CAN follow you and that FOLLOWING doesn't place ANYONES life in danger!! In this case, they were unable to prove that Zimmerman, intended to harm anyone either. He called law enforcement, like Trayvon should have done when he noticed someone following him. He is also a neighborhood watch member, which are suppose to observe people and activities. How can you fully observe, if you NEVER follow any distance?

This is actually pretty simple when a person utilizes common sense and not irrational race baiting. Trayvon Martin's life was in no danger until the point he confronted Zimmerman and assaulted him. If he hadn't done this, the worst he would have encountered would have been a police interview!! Wow, not that's got to be awful for the police to talk to you for a couple minutes.

myfather15
55844
Points
myfather15 07/21/13 - 08:39 pm
1
0
ICL

But we must remember, Zimmerman took TWO lie detector tests, was COMPLETELY cooperative in doing so; and displayed TRUTH when answering if HE confronted Martin and he said "No".

But NOTHING will satisfy the liberal blood lust!! I promise you, if the Feds file Civil Rights violations against Zimmerman and he is found NOT guilty, they will NOT be satisfied, period!! THEY believe he is guilty and that's enough for them!!

palmetto1008
9782
Points
palmetto1008 07/21/13 - 08:40 pm
1
0
Myfather: "...but the fact
Unpublished

Myfather:
"...but the fact is, in a physical altercation, a 6'02 180 pound individual is VERY capable of inflicting serious bodily harm, as TM did and was PROVEN in the trial!!"

As an officer of the law, I would hope you know that was not proven at the trial. All that was proven that there was reasonable doubt to convict GZ of second degree murder or manslaughter. It proved nothing of what happened that night.

InChristLove
22481
Points
InChristLove 07/21/13 - 09:20 pm
1
1
"But we must remember,

"But we must remember, Zimmerman took TWO lie detector tests, was COMPLETELY cooperative in doing so; and displayed TRUTH when answering if HE confronted Martin and he said "No".

Myfather, I understand this and also agree but this was not what my post was about. specsta, keeps insisting that Zimmerman "stalked" or "followed" Trayvon after the "police department" told him not to and that is false information. I only posted the testimony by the dispatcher, what the conversation was, and Zimmerman's response of "OK". There is no proof that Zimmerman followed, stalked, or confronted Trayvon and to be honest I'm sick of false information being repeated time and again.

I'd like to know what the response from specsta would be if George had been a black man and Trayvon had been a white teenager. If a white Trayvon had approached a black George, punched him in the face, broke his nose and was bashing his head into concrete, creating several lacerations and this black George had shot a white Trayvon, would you stand up for a white Trayvon and accuse a black George of being a murderer.......I kind of doubt it.

Darby
28388
Points
Darby 07/22/13 - 12:32 am
3
1
When the dust has settled, and cooler heads

prevail, the facts will not have changed.

Trayvon Martin will still have been a criminal thug who died breaking the law, and in the process, managed to make victims of his family and victims of George Zimmerman and his family.

Meanwhile, Obama, Sharpton and company will have kept the racial divisions going their way for just a bit longer.

Can't let a good crisis go to waste now, can we?

Jason Hasty
145
Points
Jason Hasty 07/22/13 - 06:45 am
0
0
palmetto 1008

hit the proverbial "nail on the head", both with regard to distinguishing between the legal and common use of the word "stalking" and in referencing the meaning of the jury's verdict. O.J. Simpson was found liable in civil court under a different standard of proof. So under the law he was not guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, yet liable by preponderance of the evidence.

I always object to a judge telling the jury "you are only concerned with the guilt or innocence of the defendant...". This is a STANDARD instruction and yet it is NOT the law. Innocence is a term of art which is more appropriately invoked in religious or moral contexts.

Back to Top

Top headlines

Georgia Regents' hospital plan chosen

Georgia Regents Medical Center won a lengthy and hardfought battle over two other Augusta hospitals to build the first hospital in Columbia County, the Georgia Department of Community Health ...
Search Augusta jobs