Hundreds gather in Augusta to protest Zimmerman verdict

Saturday, July 20, 2013 8:44 PM
Last updated Sunday, July 21, 2013 6:17 PM
  • Follow Latest News

Dozens stood at the corner of Wal­ton Way and James Brown Bou­le­vard on Saturday with neon-colored signs with “Stop the violence” scrawled across them in black ink.

Back | Next
Earl Sinkler (center), of Augusta, joins other Travyon Martin supporters at the corner of Walton Way and James Brown Boulevard after the Trayvon Martin After-the-Verdict Rally, which was held at the John H. Ruffin Jr. Courthouse. Sinkler said he wanted to show his support for the Martin family. "I can sympathize with them; I can empathize with them," he said.   JON-MICHAEL SULLIVAN/STAFF
JON-MICHAEL SULLIVAN/STAFF
Earl Sinkler (center), of Augusta, joins other Travyon Martin supporters at the corner of Walton Way and James Brown Boulevard after the Trayvon Martin After-the-Verdict Rally, which was held at the John H. Ruffin Jr. Courthouse. Sinkler said he wanted to show his support for the Martin family. "I can sympathize with them; I can empathize with them," he said.

Behind them, a crowd of several hundred was forming at the footsteps of the Augusta-Richmond Coun­ty Judicial Center for a rally called for after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin.

“Although we respect the jurisprudence decision, this nation as a whole is protesting the outcome based on the fact a young man was shot and killed,” Charles J. Smith Sr., the president of Augusta’s NAACP branch, told the crowd. “This is why we feel like (Zimmer­man) should have been found guilty.”

Speakers took turns at the microphone, standing in the shadow of the Lady Justice statue.

Shirley Nixon, of Augusta, navigated the crowd with voter registration cards tucked under one arm. She carried a megaphone in the other, reminding attendees that voting is one way to make a difference. Nixon said 50 people had registered to vote by noon.

“If they register to vote, they can have a say in what goes on,” she said.

Across the way, ralliers pushed through the crowd to buy shirts displaying a picture of a hooded Martin. Neichole Wimberly, of Au­gusta, said the shirts, which resemble a boxing poster, show the verdict was only round No. 1 of the fight for justice, with round No. 2 requiring support from the community.

“I don’t feel like nobody – white, black, Puerto Rican – should walk free after committing a crime,” said Wimberly, who was selling the shirts. “Somebody has to do something. Somebody has to push the laws.”

Christa Freeman, a law student from Augusta, said the rally was meant to call on the support of the community and to address issues at home so that other such incidents won’t happen in the future.

“Trayvon is a child of America, not just black America,” she said. “Today is just a start, of course. The verdict was just announced last Saturday, so we are just now starting to mobilize.”

Shari Collier, whose 27-year-old son was slain in 2010, said she can sympathize with Martin’s family. She said she hopes the rally will bring justice for everyone.

“This is not a black issue,” Collier said. “This is a people issue.”

At a community forum at Wil­liams Memorial Christian Metho­dist Episcopal Church, eight panelists covered topics from Florida’s “stand your ground” law to involvment in the Augusta community.

Tubman Education Center Prin­ci­pal Wayne Frazier, one of the panelists, challenged parents to take a more active role in the lives of their children.

“We profile our own children,” he said. “How do you think other people are going to feel when we profile our own children? We’re trying to get our children to do things we don’t do.”

After being recognized by a few members in the crowd, state Sen. Har­die Davis made his way to the front to offer some final thoughts.

“I don’t run from issues like this,” he said. “Where do we go from here? What are you going to do about it? It’s going to take you rolling up your sleeves in this community.”

Comments (77) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
nocnoc
72336
Points
nocnoc 07/21/13 - 10:59 am
7
4
Again the - "had done as instructed" comment.

After Posting the 911 transcript repeatedly here and links to court transcripts I have to ask are some people illiterate, blind, deaf, or too lazy learn the truth?

Maybe they just like being spoon fed from the court house steps.

Or maybe just want to press on until they convince enough others the GZ was dressed in a White hoodie KKK robe, and burning a cross over TM's body when the police also dressed in white hooded robes arrived.

soldout
1287
Points
soldout 07/21/13 - 10:59 am
3
3
no hope

The curse without a cause does not come. Any group of people who don't know what causes their problem is hopeless to fix it. Those who know, like Bill Cosby, are attacked for telling the truth. Before a problem is fixed the cause must be understood. By the way; look at the big picture. Are blacks better off today because of having to leave Africa and become slaves or would their situation be better today if they were still in Africa. God can work all things together for those who love Him. Will blacks continue to blame the white man and kill each other until including their unborn babies until the race is no more. Jesus can fix this.

itsanotherday1
59696
Points
itsanotherday1 07/21/13 - 11:06 am
9
2
Faithson, I disagree with

Faithson, I disagree with your analogy. People are discussing the local rally in the context of the nationwide brou-ha-ha over their misinformed angst. There has also been a fair amount of violence and at least civil disobedience involved; not here, but widespread in the larger cities. No one that I know of has questioned the right to protest peacefully, but it is certainly appropriate to comment when it appears that some are doing no more than rabble rousing for their own aggrandizement.

Tea Party= No violence, no cost to public for clean-up, but most importantly; a reasonable, specific platform for government change based on reality.

faithson
6698
Points
faithson 07/21/13 - 11:24 am
3
6
sorry, u'all are making my point here

I am not arguing the REASONS for the demonstrations, only that we live in a Nation where ALL sides can take action in public to address what they precieve is 'WRONG'. How one can believe 'THIERS' is justified and the other is not points to my 'nub' of the problem with so many on BOTH sides... tolerance for idea's NOT their own.

burninater
11724
Points
burninater 07/21/13 - 11:32 am
5
11
A person that becomes

A person that becomes immediately paranoid that an individual is suspicious, simply because he is a young black man, does not belong in jail. He belongs in a mental institution.

seenitB4
132257
Points
seenitB4 07/21/13 - 11:45 am
8
3
Well burn

Tell that to Jesse Jackson..his words--

He felt safer if white boys were following him than he did if blacks were behind him.

Darby
40758
Points
Darby 07/21/13 - 11:59 am
8
4
"I only see hypocracy in those who would

demean the actions of 200 people on Walton Way, only to support the actions of the 200 who showed up at the commons a couple of years ago."

.
The T-Party rally was there to demand we FOLLOW THE LAW. The one yesterday was there to demand that we IGNORE THE LAW.

HUGE difference to anybody who is paying attention.

People who openly demand a modern lynching deserve to be demeaned.

Loudly and often!

itsanotherday1
59696
Points
itsanotherday1 07/21/13 - 12:01 pm
8
2
No faithson, I very clearly

No faithson, I very clearly stated the differences to you on the how these protests were carried out and the logic/fallacy associated with each.

Darby
40758
Points
Darby 07/21/13 - 12:22 pm
8
3
"A person that becomes immediately

paranoid that an individual is suspicious, simply because he is a young black man, does not belong in jail. He belongs in a mental institution."

.
Thank you for your diagnosis, Doctor.

You, I assume, are addressing that comment to the GREAT NUMBERS of elderly black men and women (some not all that elderly) who are frightened out of their wits to find themselves alone in an untenable situation with young blacks they don't recognize.

Maybe they know something you seem to have missed.

As Jesse Jackson himself (In rare moments of candor) has acknowledged on more than one occasion.

crkgrdn
2288
Points
crkgrdn 07/21/13 - 12:22 pm
10
2
Follow the trail of money

All these "reverends" have descended on the multitudes with collection plates in hand: a preponderance of sharkskin suits, Gucci shoes, expensive cufflinks on display.

Dr. King, looking down on all of this, surely is disgusted.

allhans
25543
Points
allhans 07/21/13 - 12:30 pm
6
1
An AA lady was called to the

An AA lady was called to the witness stand in the Zimmerman case. She stated during her testimony that law enforcement at the scene of the shooting took her name and contact information. She then stated that the only person who came to her house to talk with her afterwards was an FBI agent. The moral of this comment is the FBI investigated last year, it is DONE!!!

burninater
11724
Points
burninater 07/21/13 - 12:50 pm
4
9
Seenit and Darby, my comment

Seenit and Darby, my comment applies to ANYONE with that mindset. I don't care if you're Jesse Jackson, elderly and black, or the pope for that matter. If the mere sight of a young black man elicits such paranoia in you that you feel the need to stalk and confront him while carrying deadly force, you need professional mental help.

faithson
6698
Points
faithson 07/21/13 - 12:56 pm
2
4
'I very clearly stated the differences'

tolerance for idea's NOT their own. U guys keep making my point.

seenitB4
132257
Points
seenitB4 07/21/13 - 12:56 pm
6
1
mindset

I think our energy should go to WHAT causes that mindset....which is shared by many...don't think the mental hospitals could hold them all.

Just My Opinion
7574
Points
Just My Opinion 07/21/13 - 01:32 pm
7
3
First off, thanks

First off, thanks Palmetto...I "educated" him on the way juries are chosen, and you let me know he didn't need educating based on who he was. I still don't know who he is, but I'll go with your statement. My point still stands though.
Now, raging, I would like to comment on something you said...calling Zimmerman a coward for using his pistol against Martin. You have to admit, it's very easy to call him a coward when you are not the one getting his head beaten in the front and then the back by a younger, bigger, and stronger male! If you are under Martin, and getting pummeled like that by an angry young man who wasn't stopping soon enough, what would you do? Would you not use your gun to stop it? Or would you scream out that you want to discuss it with your assailant?
I sure know what I would do.

alleycat
150
Points
alleycat 07/21/13 - 01:27 pm
5
4
Stand your ground law

The stand your ground law gives you the right to do just that ! It means you do not have to flee if you have a right to be where you are. martin was the one in the wrong place . Georgia has this law and we should be thankful. Many whites that have been attacked are being attacked by groups of blacks -what chance do they have against that . There is a whole lot of hate going into these beatings which should be called hate crimes. Why do they feel the need to attack in mobs ? To make sure whitey gets his butt kicked. To make sure whites feel humiliation and fear . All races should be against this hate and against any President that takes a side instead of being for the rights of all Americans. Zimmerman is innocent ! Get over it !

Little Lamb
57505
Points
Little Lamb 07/21/13 - 01:46 pm
8
2
Crime

From the story:

“I don’t feel like nobody – white, black, Puerto Rican – should walk free after committing a crime,” said Neichole Wimberly, who was selling T-shirts.

I agree with Ms. Wimberly. The thing is that George Zimmerman committed no crime. Therefore, he should walk free.

itsanotherday1
59696
Points
itsanotherday1 07/21/13 - 01:47 pm
6
2
Uh-huh

"If the mere sight of a young black man elicits such paranoia in you that you feel the need to stalk and confront him while carrying deadly force, you need professional mental help."

I agree, but I haven't been made aware of any cases where that happened.

Little Lamb
57505
Points
Little Lamb 07/21/13 - 01:49 pm
3
0
Concession

Burninater posted:

A person that becomes immediately paranoid that an individual is suspicious, simply because he is a young black man, does not belong in jail. He belongs in a mental institution.

I concede there is some truth in that statement. Thank goodness there are very few people who are paranoid in the manner Burninater described, because we have precious little room in our mental institutions these days; and that room is getting smaller each year.

itsanotherday1
59696
Points
itsanotherday1 07/21/13 - 01:53 pm
6
1
alleycat

I agree about "stand your ground" laws; but please don't confuse that with the Zimmerman trial. SYG was never a part of the defense or prosecution. It was a simple "self defense" issue.

Jason Hasty
145
Points
Jason Hasty 07/21/13 - 02:22 pm
4
1
Clarification

Please understand I believe the jury got it right. The evidence as I understand is that Zimmerman was attacked by an unarmed man. Since I am only admitted to practice law in Georgia I can not talk intelligently about Florida law. Typically when you talk about self defense in Georgia the issue of reasonable force will arise. You have the right to use whatever force us necessary to prevent imminent unlawful injury. So if you reasonably believe you must kill in order to avoid being unlawfully killed, you are considered justified.

As far as the jury it is sometimes not enough to say that each side had the right to exclude jurors they consider unfavorable. Jurors in Georgia are not picked they are "left over" after each side exercises its peremptory strikes and after any are excused by the court for cause, such as being unable to be fair. Defendants often file a motion to challenge the whole jury pool because it is not proportionally representative of the community.

My earlier post was designed to point out the underlying motive of the medua to have a "big story" here. While many in the black community see reflections of the past, wherein we know that there has been unfairness, and whereas they have the right to peacefully assemble, much of their energy could be focused on voting for better prosecutirs who did not try to hide evidence. The media had a field day with that as well.

AutumnLeaves
12038
Points
AutumnLeaves 07/21/13 - 02:28 pm
6
4
I wonder why the mainstream

I wonder why the mainstream media says nothing about Trayvon's choice of candy and tea at the convenience store that day. The candy was skittles and the tea was a type of high energy beverage that combined with skittles can induce strange behavior bordering on psychosis and also aggressive behavior. These substances if he ingested them combined with the THC (chemical found in marijuana) found in his system in the toxicology test, could explain what Zimmerman described as strange behavior on Trayvon's part before Trayvon struck Zimmerman in the face and landed on top of Zimmerman slamming his head into the concrete. The media and his parents also don't say anything about Trayvon's classes in martial arts. This doesn't jive with the "defenseless, innocent, child" image the media and his parents continue to deceive the public with. Too bad the parents were allegedly paid an exorbitant amount of money for Travyon's death; they are apparently using it to crucify Zimmerman and fan the flames of prejudice and racism of blacks against whites, or anyone like Zimmerman, that are trying to defend their communities against the plague of crime affecting so many of us nowadays. And we wonder why people are afraid to report anything?

validPoint
982
Points
validPoint 07/21/13 - 02:29 pm
3
7
@ragingbull

Your comment really resounds to be true with me. GZ definitely did not show sound judgment at all. Why this point is omitted by many is beyond me. Somehow, I wonder if it is innate or selective blindness that has completely taken over. Not sure what type, but blindness is present for sure.

Actually, no body knows what actually happened except the Great Creator, a dead person one who has told conflicting stories and did not even take the stand to testify. What type of foundation is this to even apply the law to? Could it be that the society we live in skips the foundation and jumps right in the middle? Well, that certain seems true in this situation.

Somehow, I believe the Great Creator in his majestic way is going to bring the real truth out because there is nothing hidden that will not be revealed, and nothing covered that will not be uncovered.

Little Lamb
57505
Points
Little Lamb 07/21/13 - 02:56 pm
3
5
With friends like Rachel . . .

Boy, that Rachel Jeantel really helped Trayvon Martin's cause when she appeared live on Piers Morgan's CNN show in an interview Tuesday night.

First, she admitted that Martin initiated the fight, i.e., Martin was the agressor and not Zimmerman.

Next, she stated that Martin did not have anything against Zimmerman because Martin perceived Zimmerman to be racist. No, instead Jeantel said Martin attacked Zimmerman because he perceived Zimmerman to be a homosexual predator.

Now that Martin's friend (a friend so credible that the state's prosecutor called her as a witness) has painted Martin as a violent homophobe, how does the mainstream media react?

Crickets.

Just My Opinion
7574
Points
Just My Opinion 07/21/13 - 03:05 pm
3
3
Jason, I will wholeheartedly

Jason, I will wholeheartedly agree with you about the definite involvement of the media in this entire mess. They have fanned the flames of racism, emphasized the meaningless, inflated the lies, and corrupted and inverted the truth. Money is surely at the bottom of all this. The media saw this entire situation as a cash-cow....prolonged printing and broadcasting of "news" that they are able to create in order to spin off other stories, all in an effort to sell more magazines and advertising. Of course it helps to bring in the parents, friends, and racial-pundits like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton...sure fire ways of getting people stirred up with even more speculation and vapid accusations. How people can't see this is beyond me.

Darby
40758
Points
Darby 07/21/13 - 03:13 pm
4
1
VP says: "Your comment really resounds (sic)

to be true with me. GZ definitely did not show sound judgment at all."

.
Wondering if he was referring to the point at which Zimmerman decided that if he continued to just lie there while having his head bashed in he would soon lose consciousness. Yeah, that must be it.

I'm also wondering why VP in his infinite wisdom did not assign similar responsibility to Martin at the point where he turned on Zimmerman and sucker punched him soundly in his nose? Does that qualify as "sound judgment"? I guess if you're VP it does.

However, that single, thoughtless, animalistic act of aggression placed Martin in his grave and left Zimmerman to defend himself against politically inspired, false charges of murder.

All Martin really needed to do was shrug off his paranoia and go home. We'd still be talking about what a horrible person Paula Dean was thirty years ago.

Sound judgment? Not really.

Just My Opinion
7574
Points
Just My Opinion 07/21/13 - 03:09 pm
3
1
Little Lamb, I saw that

Little Lamb, I saw that interview and it was mind-boggling!
I'm wondering about something....for Halloween, would it be appropriate for someone to dress up like a "white cracka"? Based on HER definition, a "white cracka" is a security guard!
Yeah....a security guard. I was going to say that anyone who lives in the South knows that a "cracka" is a derogatory word for a white person, but then I rethought that and realized that EVERYONE in America knows that it's a derogatory term for a white person! Gee....I guess we were all wrong, huh?
The NAACP should pay that girl to keep her mouth closed.

Darby
40758
Points
Darby 07/21/13 - 03:29 pm
3
3
jmo - Do you realize that you just

referred to a young black woman as a "girl"?

Under the American concept of "Original White Sin" that's a big No No!

No matter that you can call a white woman a girl and she'd probably appreciate it.

She can call you a cracker, or craka or honkie or whatever she wants to. We white "racists" need to brush up on and stay abreast of the rules, as they do tend to change on an almost daily basis.

That's how we are "kept in our place".

I only mention this because the POTUS told us all on national TV just yesterday that we need to have an open an honest discussion on race.

For once, he's right. Getting complaints from ALL sides out into the open could go a long way to ending racial divisions in America.

Who could be against that?

specsta
8985
Points
specsta 07/21/13 - 03:35 pm
4
7
Blind

I have to shake my head at the majority of these comments.

You guys still don't get it. The outrage at the verdict stems from the fact that Trayvon's murder could have been any one of our sons. And the murderer is a free man.

A grown man was so intimidated and frightened at the idea that a hooded, young black teen would dare walk through the apartment complex, in the rain, that he followed the teen, got into a confrontation with the teen and shot the teen dead.

THAT COULD HAVE BEEN ANY ONE OF OUR CHILDREN!!!!

Not only black teens who dress in contemporary clothing, but any teen!

There are 12-year-old boys who look like men from the back. Only when you see their face can you tell that they are just a child. There are children who are 6-feet tall. A young teen is not going to process his responses the same as a mature adult. Ignorant folks are acting like Trayvon should have made adult decisions, even though he was only a couple of weeks into his 17th year. Trayvon wasn't the one on trial.

Trayvon stood his ground against a stalking, armed stranger, and was murdered. Zimmerman's little baby cuts and little bloody nose, probably the result of his clumsy-looking self falling over his own two feet, does not justify shooting that child in cold blood.

The outrage is because a lot of folks have blamed Trayvon himself for his death, and there is only one person to blame - a murderer by the name of George Zimmerman.

Jason Hasty
145
Points
Jason Hasty 07/21/13 - 04:09 pm
3
1
Blind--

By what method would you propose the case be decided? The jury system is not perfect. In this case apparently 6 people agreed that there was evidence of self defense. I take issue with anyone opposed to the Constitutional right to an accused to have their case decided by a jury of their peers. Under our law there is a duty to acquit unless the prosecution proves the charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

An accused is under no burden to prove innocence. That is not the issue. Do you maintain that this was an illegal jury? Or do you just want to substitute your judgement for theirs?

Back to Top
loading...
Top headlines

GRU monkey death raises questions

Georgia Regents University acknowledged in a statement that it has been placed on probation by the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International.
Search Augusta jobs