Supermoon will appear in sky this weekend

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Set your eyes on the night sky this weekend for a spectacular sight.

The supermoon rising in North Carolina in 2011.  FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
The supermoon rising in North Carolina in 2011.

The moon will appear bigger and brighter than any other time this year, an astronomical phenomenon occuring when the moon is both full and at its closest to Earth in its orbit, which scientists call a perigee.

The perigee full moon, popularly known as a “supermoon,” will appear 8 percent larger than the average full moon, said astronomer and Georgia Regents University physics professor Grant Thompson. The moon will be about 14,000 miles closer to Earth than average.

“A lot of people think the moon’s orbit is a circle. The orbit is actually an ellipse, more like an egg shape,” Thompson said.

Supermoons are not unusual – one occurred in May and another one comes in July – but this Sunday’s full moon will appear the largest of all.

“It’s amazing how bright it is, and it lights up the earth significantly,” said Darlene Smalley, the program director of Dupont Planetarium at the Ruth Patrick Science Education Center in Aiken.

The moon will be closest to Earth at 7:32 a.m. Sunday. Such close proximity won’t occur again until August 2014.

Because the moon reaches its peak fullness on Sunday morning, the supermoon can be viewed Saturday and Sunday nights, Smalley said.

The moon’s brightness will be too blinding to safely view with a telescope, Smalley said. People can use binoculars to get a closer look, but a full moon is not the best time to view lunar features such as craters, she said.

Some people will have a difficult time discerning the moon’s bigger appearance, but the brightness will be evident, Thompson said. Unless one looks at the full moon often and knows its typical size, the supermoon won’t appear much different in size.

The supermoon will affect ocean as the moon’s gravitational force will cause extra high and extra low tides.

SHOOTING THE MOON

Photographing the moon isn’t just for professionals. Here are some tips for capturing the moon with different devices:

IPHONE

1. Before going outside, take a photo of a bright light. Tap and hold the screen area to lock the focus and exposure (available on iPhone 4S and 5).

2. With the exposure locked, focus on the moon using a tripod if available to hold the phone still. Click.

3. Several iPhone applications are available that add camera features to your phone.

DIGITAL SLR CAMERA

1. With camera in full manual mode, set ISO to 100 or lower, aperture to between f/11 and f/16 and shutter speed to 1/60.

2. Use a tripod and telephoto lens if you have one.

3. Avoid ambient light such as street lights and traffic.

POINT-AND-SHOOT

If the camera settings can be changed manually, follow directions for DSLR. If not, it’s probably best not to try.

Sources: www.ericteske.com; www.lightstalking.com

Comments (10) Add comment
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AutumnLeaves
8090
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AutumnLeaves 06/20/13 - 10:14 pm
2
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Will that mean we get some

Will that mean we get some little earthquakes in areas of the U.S. that rarely get them? Higher tides? More pressure on fault lines where tides surge inland?

AutumnLeaves
8090
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AutumnLeaves 06/20/13 - 10:15 pm
2
0
I hope I remember to take a

I hope I remember to take a look Sunday night. Ought to be pretty if it is clear. Even if rain is predicted it might clear up sometime overnight.

seenitB4
88294
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seenitB4 06/21/13 - 07:43 am
2
0
Supermoon

I'll be looking at the moon...but I'll be seeing you...:)

Darby
26087
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Darby 06/21/13 - 08:59 pm
3
1
You won't be seeing me, I don't even know

you!

"....the moon is both full and at its closest to Earth in its orbit, which scientists call a perigee."

Fine, but what do I call it? I'm not a scientist! I don't want to get myself in trouble here.

Little Lamb
46413
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Little Lamb 06/22/13 - 12:55 am
1
0
Familiar Places

I know what you are talking about, SeenIt!

;-)

seenitB4
88294
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seenitB4 06/22/13 - 07:25 pm
2
0
Thanks LLamb

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7cbBX6FITQ

I knew the right people on here would get it...♥

Riverman1
84956
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Riverman1 06/23/13 - 09:16 am
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Yeah, yeah, I got it, too.

Yeah, yeah, I got it, too. :)

But one little wobble of that orbit and we all get sucked off earth into some black hole inhabited by egg laying monsters in an alternate universe.

seenitB4
88294
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seenitB4 06/23/13 - 11:32 am
0
0
^^^RM

Only if we are lucky!!

Just don't want to get burned to a crispy flake.

Darby
26087
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Darby 06/23/13 - 03:30 pm
1
0
"But one little wobble of that orbit and we all

get sucked off earth into some black hole inhabited by egg laying monsters in an alternate universe."

.
Maybe, in that alternate universe, we ARE the egg laying monsters......

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