Coyote inquiries on the rise this year, especially in Evans

Monday, June 10, 2013 12:49 PM
Last updated Tuesday, June 11, 2013 5:09 AM
  • Follow Latest News

Although coyotes have been part of Georgia’s landscape for decades, inquiries and complaints are on the rise this year – especially in Columbia County.

Back | Next
Georgia's coyote population continues to expand, spawning more sightings and complaints in suburban areas.  SPECIAL
SPECIAL
Georgia's coyote population continues to expand, spawning more sightings and complaints in suburban areas.

“It’s mainly a lot more sightings during the day,” said Lee Taylor, the regional game management supervisor for Georgia’s Wildlife Resources Division.

The division’s office in Thomson has fielded 20 to 30 coyote complaints this spring.

“This time of year, they often have a litter of pups they are taking care of so they’re more active and out hunting,” Taylor said.

Most of the calls are from the Evans area of Columbia County, in neighborhoods along Washington Road and the Wal-Mart.

Wildlife authorities, he said, do not capture or remove coyotes but can offer tips to homeowners who don’t want them around.

“We try to help people understand why a coyote might be coming around their house,” he said. “It might be their garbage, keeping cat or dog food outside or even having a bird feeder that attracts squirrels, which are easy prey for a coyote.”

Coyotes are very adaptable in suburban areas and are difficult to trap or remove, often requiring the assistance of a professional. They are also opportunistic feeders known to kill and eat cats and small dogs, he said. Attacks on humans are very rare.

Residents in populated areas often hear coyotes at night, when they are vocalizing with other animals.

“The scientific name of the coyote, Canis latrans, literally means ‘barking dog’,” Taylor said. “Coyotes use a variety of vocalizations such as barking like dogs, but most often they are heard making shrill yips and howls. Howling is often a group effort that begins as a simple howl but quickly increases into a series of group howls and high-pitched barks.

“It looks like the coyotes are here to stay, so it will be best if people can try and find ways to coexist with them.”

COYOTE FACTS

Coyotes are found throughout Georgia and are in every state except Hawaii.

In Georgia, coyotes typically weigh 15-30 pounds, and males tend to be larger than females.

When running, a coyote usually holds its tail at “half-mast” or straight out behind it, unlike domestic dogs.

While Coyotes play an important role in the ecosystem by helping keep rodent populations under control, they can and do prey on domestic cats and small dogs.

Most coyote attacks on pets occur either at night, at dusk or dawn. During these times, be especially careful if you’re walking your pet in wooded areas.

Residents can help prevent coyote problems by never feeding them – intentionally or unintentionally.

Close off crawlspaces under porches and sheds. Coyotes and other animals use such areas for resting and raising young.

Coyotes eat whatever is available, including fruits, nuts, seeds, dead animals, rodents, garbage, pet food, house cats and small dogs.

They breed every year with two to 12 pups per litter. Pups are raised in a den.

Removing coyotes from one area can result in other coyotes moving in from surrounding areas and producing more pups per litter.

Georgia officials did not import and release coyotes to control white-tailed deer populations.

Coyotes made it to Georgia by their natural territorial expansion across the Mississippi River and were brought in and released in fox pens.

Source: Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Comments (14) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
David Parker
7923
Points
David Parker 06/10/13 - 01:21 pm
5
1
Good Grief

Maybe I'm mistaken, but I think they were introduced for a purpose and now they are the ones who are calling the shots. It's not a situation where we control their population and tweak the deer population. Now it's up to the coyote to say "when". Should stop trying to play Mother Nature this way before every deer in Georgia is gone gone gone!

Dixieman
15896
Points
Dixieman 06/10/13 - 02:03 pm
7
1
Riverman1
86798
Points
Riverman1 06/10/13 - 02:09 pm
3
2
Rob, isn't it legal to kill

Rob, isn't it legal to kill them? I thought so.

gargoyle
18511
Points
gargoyle 06/10/13 - 02:14 pm
3
0
Suburban my foot! There is a

Suburban my foot! There is a pack that moves around Highland Av./ Gordon Hwy. .We had one in our carport a few years ago, if I get bored some nights I'll get out the call and see where they are at.

Fiat_Lux
15897
Points
Fiat_Lux 06/10/13 - 04:20 pm
2
0
Yeah, I think Dixieman has the best answer

except I'd go with .30-.30 or buckshot. I hope never to be so close that a short barrel would be accurate enough.

burninater
9680
Points
burninater 06/10/13 - 04:45 pm
2
3
DP, the article clearly

DP, the article clearly states that coyotes were NOT deliberately re-introduced, but that this is territorial expansion -- or, if you will, Mother Nature playing Mother Nature.

As far as the deer population, I challenge you to find a single documented case of coyotes wiping out the deer population in their territory. It's not gonna happen.

itsanotherday1
45283
Points
itsanotherday1 06/10/13 - 10:41 pm
5
1
The fact they are a threat to

The fact they are a threat to domestic pets and small farm animals is enough for me to shoot any that i can.

gargoyle
18511
Points
gargoyle 06/10/13 - 10:54 pm
4
0
burninater; Another case of

burninater; Another case of who do you think is right , the experts or your own eyes. If you watch the deer population out in Burk County you would have to disagree with the experts . As soon as the coyotes moved in the population declined, mostly the yearlings go missing. I wish I wouldn't have listened to the experts and started hunting coyotes when they first showed up.

Riverman1
86798
Points
Riverman1 06/11/13 - 04:13 am
5
0
I've seen fawn caught by a

I've seen fawn caught by a coyote on my property in Evans. Again, I thought the state encouraged the killing of them? This article instead seems like the DNR is saying coexist with them.

Bodhisattva
6464
Points
Bodhisattva 06/11/13 - 07:14 am
4
0
I'm with Fiat. If you're
Unpublished

I'm with Fiat. If you're close enough to use a short barrel you're liable to be knee deep in coyotes. I'm not trying to kill them, just drive them away. I use a 1,300fps .177 air rifle. Spot with night vision. The added advantage is it doesn't make the neighbors think WWlll has started.

Bodhisattva
6464
Points
Bodhisattva 06/11/13 - 07:15 am
3
0
Forgot to add, an air rifle
Unpublished

Forgot to add, an air rifle would make a much better choice in suburban settings as well.

CobaltGeorge
164292
Points
CobaltGeorge 06/11/13 - 07:36 am
1
1
I See

an average of 3 to 5 per month crossing the 600 feet of dam at Cobalt Park. I can verify one thing, There is one less in the population about a month ago. Very challenging open sight target.

David Parker
7923
Points
David Parker 06/11/13 - 09:12 am
3
0
burninater

Correct, no stocking program was admitted. The fact is, the wolves were eliminated and created a void for the 'yotes to move in. So indeed Mother Nature is NOT the cause of the end result. The coyote population is a direct influence on the fawn survival rates and that's just the way it is. I'm not a biologist but there's not much debate there.

from the DNR website:

Because coyotes are a non-native species in Georgia, there is no closed season for their harvest.

and everything in this article:

http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/metro/2012-10-22/hungry-coyotes-might-...
***
"were brought in and released in fox pens" from the article. This doesn't really strike me as a "natural" territorial expansion but whateves.

Riverman1
86798
Points
Riverman1 06/11/13 - 09:23 am
3
0
As David Parker Said

http://georgiawildlife.com/node/1391
The GA DNR Cyotes Hunting season official answer is:

"Because coyotes are a non-native species in Georgia, there is no closed season for their harvest."

rebellious
21293
Points
rebellious 06/11/13 - 10:27 am
1
0
Rabbit and Quail

populations are being threatened by the influx of Coyote. Great entertainment for these country boys out here is to sit in a field at night calling them in, then hit the lights and have a field day. Varmints, I tell ya, that's all they are.

David Parker
7923
Points
David Parker 06/11/13 - 02:15 pm
0
0
cull'm all!

cull'm all!

Back to Top

Top headlines

Azziz is finalist for UNLV presidency

Ricardo Azziz, who has been mentioned in the past for other open university positions in Florida and Texas, is one of three finalists for the position.
Search Augusta jobs