More apartment units coming to Walton Oaks

Friday, May 24, 2013 4:58 PM
Last updated Saturday, May 25, 2013 1:49 AM
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Augusta’s first mixed-income housing development to replace a public housing project is about to get bigger.

Construction is scheduled to begin this fall on the next phase of Walton Oaks, an apartment complex off Sand Bar Ferry Road on the former site of Underwood Homes. When completed about one year from groundbreaking, an additional 106 apartments will be available, said Jacob Oglesby, the executive director of the Augusta Housing Authority.

The housing authority has secured low-income tax credits for the new units, Oglesby said. Final documentation for approval will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development this summer.

Work on a tax credit application for the fourth and final phase of Walton Oaks is underway to be submitted next month. If approved, construction on 64 senior housing units could begin in fall 2014, Oglesby said.

“It’s been very successful so far. It was always intended to be a four-phase development,” he said.

The first phase – Legacy at Walton Oaks – opened in October 2011 for residents older than 55. The initial phase targeting families opened last July featuring 75 units, with 14 managed by the Augusta Housing Authority for public housing tenants.

The property, an effort to end Augusta’s concentrations of low-income housing, is developed by Atlanta-based Walton Communities.

The existing family units reached 100 percent leasing occupancy in November, said Melissa Whirledge, the director of marketing for Walton Communities.

Of the 106 family units to be built, 16 will be public housing. Twenty-four will be one-bedroom apartments, 66 two-bedrooms and 16 three-bedrooms.

The units will serve families earning 60 percent or less of the area median income. Tenants must pass credit and background checks.

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dichotomy
32899
Points
dichotomy 05/24/13 - 09:01 pm
6
2
"an effort to end Augusta’s

"an effort to end Augusta’s concentrations of low-income housing"

Let me finish that sentence for you Jacob......"end Augusta’s concentrations of low-income housing.....downtown..... by relocating them to the Southside with Section 8. We still want them kept in one area.....just not downtown here where Deke is "redeveloping". Don't want no concentrations downtown."

Riverman1
83800
Points
Riverman1 05/24/13 - 10:28 pm
5
0
The first sentence says it

The first sentence says it.

"Augusta’s first mixed-income housing development to replace a public housing project is about to get bigger."

itsanotherday1
43009
Points
itsanotherday1 05/24/13 - 10:59 pm
7
0
What did people do before

What did people do before housing projects, welfare, section 8, food stamps, etc., ad nauseum? I don't recall any history suggesting people were starving or dying in the streets; but I do recall that before all of these gimme programs we had more intact families and less street crime.

Bodhisattva
6180
Points
Bodhisattva 05/25/13 - 04:14 am
1
7
Slum, shantytown, tenement,

Slum, shantytown, tenement, Hooverville, skid row. Any of those terms ring a bell? Please read up a little more on history about people starving in the streets.

junkyardpig
417
Points
junkyardpig 05/25/13 - 07:17 am
5
1
senior citizens/hoodlums

who in their right mind would want to purchase a place to live or rent with housing authority folks next door with all the negative baggage that comes with them.

TrukinRanger
1748
Points
TrukinRanger 05/25/13 - 08:00 am
0
0
I don't understand why they
Unpublished

I don't understand why they speak of this like it's a good thing. It's still too close to downtown and the hoodlums that lived in the old projects will live in the new projects. Yes, there will be some poor, or elderly that need the help, but overall we all know how it's going to turn out in the long run.

JRC2024
8854
Points
JRC2024 05/25/13 - 09:32 am
3
0
dicotomy, Underwood homes is

dicotomy, Underwood homes is downtown near the river and Columbia Nitrogen. They are just adding more homes on the property that already has a new development. I agree with you. Keep them in one area that can be somewhat controlled.

Riverman1
83800
Points
Riverman1 05/25/13 - 12:10 pm
1
1
Bod Is Right

Actually, Bod is right. There were these little barewalled shanty towns before public housing. You can still see these houses standing in a few places. But that was in the era of segregation when black folks couldn't get a decent job. Hopefully, all that's changed.

I'd like to see what would happen if we DID AWAY with public housing and gave the people the impetus to pay for their own housing. I believe you would create a far more reliable tenant, taking care of the house, if he were paying his own way. You would also force people to work to pay for the house which would have beneficial effects in many ways.

itsanotherday1
43009
Points
itsanotherday1 05/25/13 - 12:28 pm
2
0
The point is, people did what

The point is, people did what they had to do to survive and did not live off the efforts of others. I grew up in the deep south, in a small, relatively poor town. I never knew of anyone starving; even the hoboes found a way to scrounge up enough to eat. Families stayed together and took care of their own.

Oh, and there were plenty of the shanties scattered around the county. Those folks would raise a pig or two, have a garden out back, and cut their own firewood to stay warm in the winter. They made do with what they had even though life was dealing them some very crappy cards via Jim Crow, segregation, discrimination, and so on.

Sweet son
10396
Points
Sweet son 05/25/13 - 12:45 pm
1
0
Underwood Homes area would be good for the

new and improved Cherry Tree Crossing. Talking about public housing I think that Olmstead Homes was the first project built in the US. If not first, it was early on!

allhans
23641
Points
allhans 05/25/13 - 04:45 pm
2
0
Actually the poor in the

Actually the poor in the South had it much easier than our northern friends...No tall dirty tenements. Most public housing in the south at least had a front and back door..a little patch of grass..a porch to sit on.

butterflygina
159
Points
butterflygina 05/25/13 - 06:50 pm
0
0
It would be interesting to

It would be interesting to note how the residents whose rent is unsubsidized feel about living "next to these peoples" as so many of you have put. The property is beautiful and from my understanding they have a community center with regular activities for all the resident children. I haven't heard anything negative so far about it, maybe it would be a good idea to have information about police response there. And it's highly unlikely that the Section 8 and Cherry Tree people are going into this neighborhood or another like it someplace else. There are only 16 available for "these people". So I suppose they will be wherever their vouchers are accepted. Love thy neighbor!

Bacon Grease
328
Points
Bacon Grease 05/26/13 - 03:24 am
1
0
Parasitism

The parasite benefits at the expense of the host, parasitoids generally kill their hosts. Parasites appropriate food gathered by the host. Parasites increase their fitness by exploiting hosts for resources necessary for their survival.

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