'96 Olympics bomber fights to keep profits from autobiography

  • Follow Metro

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Convicted Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph is fighting efforts by federal prosecutors in Alabama to seize the small profits from an autobiography he recently published from prison with the help of a brother.

Rudolph, serving a life sentence for bombings that killed two people in Alabama and Georgia in the 1990s, sought a hearing to contest the seizure in a letter filed last week in federal court in Birmingham.

A judge had not ruled on the request Tuesday.

Peggy Sanford, spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office, told AL.com that prosecutors have received more than $200 from the North Carolina-based LuLu Press Inc., which stopped selling the book shortly after it was published.

Rudolph, 46, pleaded guilty to detonating a bomb at a downtown park during the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. He also pleaded guilty to setting off a bomb outside an abortion clinic in downtown Birmingham in 1998.

Rudolph still owes more than $1 million in restitution, prosecutors said in a court filing, and money from the book will go to settle that debt. The 394-page book, titled Between the Lines of Drift: The Memoirs of a Militant, was published with the help of brother Daniel K.
Rudolph.

Eric Rudolph recently sent letters to his defense attorney and others saying he was on a hunger strike to protest his treatment at the federal prison where he is held in isolation in Florence, Colo.


Top headlines

2 Thomson slayings probed

Authorities are investigating two unrelated slayings in Thomson that happened in a 24-hour span this weekend.
Search Augusta jobs