Union general gets Civil War marker near Broad Street birthplace

Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 6:02 PM
Last updated Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012 1:03 AM
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The Civil War was more than just a battlefield conflict.

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Meigs (from left) watches city Administrator Fred Russell and Todd Groce, the president of the Georgia Historical Society, unveil the marker to the Civil War Union Army's quartermaster general.  EMILY ROSE BENNETT/STAFF
EMILY ROSE BENNETT/STAFF
Meigs (from left) watches city Administrator Fred Russell and Todd Groce, the president of the Georgia Historical Society, unveil the marker to the Civil War Union Army's quartermaster general.

It affected nearly every aspect of people’s lives, but 90 percent of Georgia’s 1,000 Civil War markers were about battles and Confederate military leaders.

That prompted the Georgia Historical Society to erect 150 historical markers across the state to tell lesser-known stories of the conflict.

“There was virtually nothing about African-Americans, about women, about the homefront, about Unionists, and there was an opportunity for us to tell the story of the war in its fullness and all of its diversity,” said Todd Groce, the president of the organization.

The latest marker in the series was unveiled and dedicated Friday in the 600 block of Broad Street, near Union Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs’ birthplace. The marker describes Meigs’ accomplishments in engineering some of Washington’s most important landmarks and his efforts during the war.

“This is a really interesting man,” said Montgomery Meigs, a third-great-nephew of the Civil War general.

Meigs, himself a retired four-star general, was the keynote speaker at the dedication ceremony.

The first Meigs was the grandson of Josiah Meigs, an early president of the University of Georgia. He lived with his family in Augusta for only a couple of years before his father, Charles, moved the family back to Pennsylvania.

It has been said that Charles’ wife, Mary, couldn’t stomach the institution of slavery.

As an adult, Meigs engineered the Washington Aqueduct to provide the city with clean water. Then he built Cabin John Bridge, the longest stone arch in the world at the time, to cross it. He also built the dome on the U.S. Capitol.

As quartermaster general in the Union Army, Meigs oversaw the feeding and clothing of the army.

When the plantation that belonged to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s wife – Arlington – was confiscated by the federal government, Meigs declared it a national military cemetery to discourage Lee’s return.

Meigs was buried there when he died in 1892.

His descendant said he was honored to be a part of the dedication ceremony.

“Thank you for what you’re doing in this state to keep the history alive,” Meigs said.

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OpenCurtain
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OpenCurtain 12/07/12 - 08:43 pm
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3

Why do we Honor him here?

Clearing up some facts

It seem he was only born here, and not really raised here.

"Meigs, Montgomery Cunningham (May 3, 1816 - Jan. 2, 1892), soldier and engineer, was born in Augusta, Georgia. During his childhood the family moved from Georgia to Philadelphia, where he matriculated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1831. "

He later entered the United States Military Academy, graduating in 1836, fifth in his class.

While born a Southerner, he spent more time in the North and was raised Northerner.

Therefore, I must re-track my earlier comment on him being a Traitor to the South. He was never even a real Southerner having spend About 80% of his early childhood life in the north before joining the Northern Military.

John Locke
241
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John Locke 12/07/12 - 09:26 pm
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4

Northern Military??

That military was the United States Army, the army of the nation, not one section.

just an opinion
2123
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just an opinion 12/07/12 - 10:33 pm
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This is screwed up!

What would happen if we tried to honor a Confederate General up North?

Techfan
6461
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Techfan 12/08/12 - 06:03 am
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" I must re-track my earlier

" I must re-track my earlier comment on him being a Traitor to the South." vs the 100% of the members of the Confederacy who were traitors to the United States of America.

walrus4ever
354
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walrus4ever 12/08/12 - 08:38 am
5
3

I f Unleashingind it ironic

I f Unleashingind it ironic that we side with the Syrian rebels in their fight to seperste themselves from a government they found oppressive and at the same time denegrate the efforts of our population to accomplish the same task. There is no difference between the methods of Assad and Lincoln to subjugate their respective populations. Unleashing genocidal armies to starve,attack cities full of noncombatants, burn homes, farms and schools etc. The odious institution of slavery not withstanding, there is no difference between the two.

Riverman1
70543
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Riverman1 12/08/12 - 08:52 am
10
1

The states seceded from the

The states seceded from the British Empire and later from the "perpetual union" under the Articles of Confederation to ratify the Constitution. The US Supreme Court has said revolution or consent of the states could lead to a successful secession. The Civil War may have practically settled the question, but at that time (and probably now) there existed a legal right to secede.

Riverman1
70543
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Riverman1 12/08/12 - 08:59 am
9
4

I still say we should find

I still say we should find the exact location where he was born, demolish any structures present, plow the earth under, salt it so nothing will ever grow there again and place Port-a-Potties for all to use.

seenitB4
72618
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seenitB4 12/08/12 - 09:26 am
6
4

Stop with this nonesense

The article says...
There was virtually nothing about African-Americans, about women, about the homefront, about Unionists, and there was an opportunity for us to tell the story of the war in its fullness and all of its diversity

Soo.....are we going to equalize ---get quotas --blend everything in the PAST too....WE CAN'T DO IT for cotton picking sakes...stop it.....we have lost our ever loving minds....

RM..why don't you tell us how you really feel...LOL

Riverman1
70543
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Riverman1 12/08/12 - 10:07 am
5
2

SeenIt, we should do the same

SeenIt, we should do the same thing to Woodrow Wilson's boyhood home, too, while we're at it. Democrat, League of Nations and all that.

seenitB4
72618
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seenitB4 12/08/12 - 10:12 am
3
1

If you like this article--you will like this one too..

http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/metro/2012-12-04/history-marker-honor-...

We are called narrow minds & ignorant fools....by golly...say that to my face...haah lol....lol

Jake
30337
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Jake 12/08/12 - 12:15 pm
2
2

Fantasy & Reality

The fantasy notion that the pre-war south was living in a somewhat "charmed" atmosphere with southern belles in big hoop skirts and cavalier gentlemen riding around on their horses is in stark contrast to the reality of African-Americans being sold as property and hunted down like animals when they could take it no more. If you don't believe me then go to the Augusta Chronicle Archives and pull up a paper from the early 1860's and it is right there for you to read in all of it's infamy. Reality, indeed, and not some "Gone With The Wind" fantasy.

Jake
30337
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Jake 12/08/12 - 12:19 pm
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Ft Bragg, CA

BTW, there is a historical marker up in Ft Bragg, CA, stating that the town was named after General Braxton Bragg so, yes, confederates to get honorable mention in areas other than the south.

seenitB4
72618
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seenitB4 12/08/12 - 12:37 pm
5
0

Be fair Jake...the North had slaves too

Slaveholders and the commodities of the South had a strong influence on United States politics: "in the 72 years between the election of George Washington and the election of Abraham Lincoln, 50 of those years [had] a slaveholder as president of the United States, and, for that whole period of time, there was never a person elected to a second term who was not a slaveholder."[8] Slavery was a contentious issue in the politics of the United States from the 1770s through the 1860s, becoming a topic of debate in the drafting of the Constitution (with the slave trade protected for 20 years and slaves being counted toward Congressional apportionment); a subject of Federal legislation, such as the ban on the trans-Atlantic slave trade in 1808 and the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850; and a subject of landmark US Supreme Court cases, such as the Dred Scott decision of 1857.

soapy_725
43306
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soapy_725 12/08/12 - 12:38 pm
0
0

Politically correct history

Unpublished

Woodrow Wilson. Our first socialist president. One of many skin color racist presidents. The force behind a "world government", government schools and racial genocide as a means to control "the stability of global wealth".

seenitB4
72618
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seenitB4 12/08/12 - 12:38 pm
4
1

Presidents owned slaves

50 of those years [had] a slaveholder as president of the United States, and, for that whole period of time, there was never a person elected to a second term who was not a slaveholder

soapy_725
43306
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soapy_725 12/08/12 - 12:41 pm
0
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Great Britain outlawed slavery in English and

Unpublished

promoted it in the US because Great Britain controlled the global cotton markets. From the fields to the factories.

seenitB4
72618
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seenitB4 12/08/12 - 12:42 pm
3
2

btw

I saw the movie Lincoln & it was one of the best of this year.....amazing that he was wise enough to see the future of America at that time.....& smart enough to brace for the fallout he knew would comewith his decision.....
What bothers me is for "some" to portray the south as the bad guy when we all know what happened..

seenitB4
72618
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seenitB4 12/08/12 - 12:52 pm
4
1

GWTW happened with the northern owners too

In cities such as Boston and Newport, 20-25% percent of the population consisted of enslaved laborers. Other large cities, such as Philadelphia and New York, also supported significant enslaved populations. Although enslaved people in cities and towns were not needed as agricultural workers, they were employed in a variety of other capacities: domestic servants, artisans, craftsmen, sailors, dock workers, laundresses, and coachmen. Particularly in urban areas, owners often hired out their skilled enslaved workers and collected their wages. Others were used as household servants and demonstrated high social status. Whatever the case, slaves were considered property that could be bought and sold. Slaves thus constituted a portion of the owners' overall wealth. Although Southern slaveholders had a deeper investment in slaves than Northerners, many Northerners, too, had significant portions of their wealth tied up in their ownership of enslaved people.

I'm leaving now.....but want folks to realize....we had some Rhetts & Scarletts up north too...they didn't have the sweet southern twang...

Jake
30337
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Jake 12/08/12 - 02:38 pm
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Slavery

I am against treating people as property whether it be north, south, east or west. I would venture to say that the southern economy (Cotton is King) was largely slave based, hence the term "slave states".

RogueKnight
201
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RogueKnight 12/08/12 - 05:25 pm
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I have an idea

Let's stop dwelling on what once was and start living in the present, and start doing something to make our own worlds better places to live in.

Riverman1
70543
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Riverman1 12/08/12 - 07:51 pm
1
1

The ladies and gentlemen of

The ladies and gentlemen of the South made a magnificient effort fighting the uncouth yankees and their foreign mercenaries. The South has produced great writers and artists. I've shot three people in duels defending the honor of the South.

usafveteran
30
Points
usafveteran 12/09/12 - 07:29 pm
0
0

Washington was a traitor too

For those who consider all Confederates "traitors" or "rebels",, must remember that George Washington was considered a "traitor" or "rebel" by the established British government at the time having given up his British uniform for a blue one patterned after the French Army. Moreover, the British government offered freedom to American slaves if they would support the British cause. Does this sound familiar? People need to get their history from books rather than movies!

I bet they won't be putting up a marker in Philadelphia for Gen. John Pemberton who was born in Philadelphia and served in the Confederate Army.

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