Death penalty tossed in Georgia triple murder

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ATLANTA — The Georgia Supreme Court has unanimously tossed out the death sentence of a man who was convicted of killing his wife and twin 2-year-old sons in Lithonia in 2006.

The court on Monday upheld Clayton Jerrod Ellington’s murder conviction, and a jury will once again have the option to sentence him to death.

Ellington’s attorneys had argued the trial court unfairly prohibited them from asking prospective jurors whether they would consider a life sentence rather than the death penalty.

Ellington was convicted of attacking his wife, Berna, with a hammer as she slept, and beating to death his twin sons in their cribs.

Officials in the DeKalb County Assistant District Attorney’s office were not immediately available for comment.

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F4therTime
4656
Points
F4therTime 11/19/12 - 11:20 am
4
1
Waste of money
Unpublished

Fry him already!

MarinerMan
2107
Points
MarinerMan 11/19/12 - 11:22 am
5
1
I vote kill him. As is the
Unpublished

I vote kill him. As is the case so many times, his execution will be much more humane, than his victim's. I do believe in "an eye for an eye". I say he should suffer the same fate ans his victim's. Beating two, two year-old children to death...

itsanotherday1
41953
Points
itsanotherday1 11/19/12 - 11:35 am
6
0
The problem is; what caring,

The problem is; what caring, sane person as executioner could carry beating him to death with a hammer.

scgator
1042
Points
scgator 11/19/12 - 12:13 pm
7
2
My wife and I are of the same

My wife and I are of the same opinion regarding capitol punishment; if a person or persons is found guilty of directly or indirectly causing the death of another human being; then give them a 31 day sentence with no parole. Give them 30 days to "clear their conscience" or get "right with their God" and on day 31, put them to death. Wasted taxpayer dollars end; family has closure, "NEXT".................!

Fiat_Lux
15078
Points
Fiat_Lux 11/19/12 - 12:46 pm
6
0
Does anybody know why he did it?

He must have been found sane and competent to stand trial, as in he was determined to have known what he was doing and that it was wrong.

So why did he do it? What could a pair of 2-year-olds have done to merit that kind of rage?

itsanotherday1
41953
Points
itsanotherday1 11/19/12 - 01:02 pm
6
0
scgator

Emotionally, I agree with you, but in practicality I can't. If it is a case with 100% ironclad proof of guilt, yep; fast track them to the gurney. But if there is a shred of a possibility they are innocent, then no, allow defense time to find that shred through appeals.

In the above case, it seems it would be a fast track; they aren't arguing his guilt, only the sentence.

CobaltGeorge
155202
Points
CobaltGeorge 11/19/12 - 02:04 pm
5
3
ME

"The problem is; what caring, sane person as executioner could carry beating him to death with a hammer."

ME !

itsanotherday1
41953
Points
itsanotherday1 11/19/12 - 02:14 pm
4
1
Nah

Cgee, you are much too kind hearted for that. I wouldn't even want to be one of five on a firing squad, and two of us firing blanks.

my.voice
4728
Points
my.voice 11/19/12 - 02:38 pm
3
2
The judicial branch is

The judicial branch is running the country. Everything violates something EXCEPT the victims rights these days.

Tullie
2930
Points
Tullie 11/19/12 - 03:57 pm
3
2
This gripes me

This is the kind of thing that really gripes me when lawyers can fool around and fool around because of stupid technicalities.

They said the trial court unfairly prohibited them from asking prospective jurors whether they would consider a life sentence rather than the death penalty.

And that would have done what..pft?

Blue State Of Mind
26
Points
Blue State Of Mind 11/19/12 - 05:49 pm
4
2
If you imprison someone and
Unpublished

If you imprison someone and discover they were innocent you can free them. What do you do if you kill someone and discover they were innocent?

If killing another human being is so wrong it deserves special punishment than how is it not wrong when we kill them ourselves?

Is it somehow not immoral to kill a human being when 12 people decide to rather than just one?

I am against the death penalty. Our government and society screw up way to much to allow them to decide who lives and who dies if we can help it. We have national leaders who half of us consider idiots so how can we be comfortable with the same group deciding they can kill some of us?

130 people on death rows have been released with proof that they were wrongfully convicted. DNA, available in less than 10% of all homicides, can’t guarantee we won’t execute innocent people. If someone is convicted and later found innocent you can release him from prison, but not from the grave.

The death penalty doesn't prevent others from committing murder. No reliable study shows the death penalty deters others. Homicide rates are higher in states and regions that have it than in those that don’t.

Life without parole, on the books in 48 states, also prevents reoffending. It means what it says, and spending 23 of 24 hours a day locked in a tiny cell is not a picnic. Life without parole costs less than the death penalty.

rmwhitley
5542
Points
rmwhitley 11/19/12 - 06:16 pm
0
0
Activist judges
Unpublished

and lowyers, again.

itsanotherday1
41953
Points
itsanotherday1 11/19/12 - 06:41 pm
4
1
I would be happier with LWOP

I would be happier with LWOP if it were more restrictive. Alas, the bleeding hearts say that is cruel and unusual, so even LWOP gives them a modicum of comfort; though as you say, it is no picnic.

palmetto1008
9782
Points
palmetto1008 11/19/12 - 11:05 pm
2
0
Tullie: the attorneys are
Unpublished

Tullie: the attorneys are not monkeying around. It's the job of the defense, especially given the question: death or LWOP. It's founded on substance, not just a technicality, and good empirical evidence to back it up.

Tullie
2930
Points
Tullie 11/20/12 - 05:58 am
2
0
Palmetto said:

Tullie: the attorneys are not monkeying around. It's the job of the defense, especially given the question: death or LWOP. It's founded on substance, not just a technicality, and good empirical evidence to back it up.

Yes, I see what you are saying. Thanks, I did not fully comprehend what I was reading.

rebellious
20630
Points
rebellious 11/20/12 - 10:01 am
2
0
Sentencing

Should be Life in a Prison where the other inmates all have hammers. I have been told there is no appreciation for perpetrators of violence against children in the big house. Let it work itself out. Justice delayed is justice denied.

Coward, while she was asleep. Real big man!

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