Notable deaths of 2011

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BOONE KNOX

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Officer James D. Paugh.    Zach Boyden-Holmes/Staff
Zach Boyden-Holmes/Staff
Officer James D. Paugh.

JAN. 13

Knox, of Thomson, was a successful business and civic leader whose influence extended throughout the region. His efforts as a philanthropist will be long remembered as he led the successful fundraising campaign for the Kroc Center in Harrisburg.

KEITH JOHNSON

JAN. 18

A salesman who became a full-time artist, Johnson was known for his large religious artworks and his larger-than-life personality. Friends said Johnson, a longtime member of Augusta’s Alleluia Community, “really and sincerely tried to live a life that was pleasing to God.”

HARRY STEINE

JAN. 27

A longtime Augusta lawyer and member of Augusta City Council from 1956-68, Steine died just days after his 102nd birthday.

A World War II Army veteran, he was elected president of Walton Way Temple five times.

ANTONIO JONES

JAN. 29

Jones served his community for two decades as an Augusta firefighter. Co-workers said he excelled at his job and was a consistent and popular public servant.

FRANK CHIRKINIAN

MARCH 4

A pioneer in television golf coverage, Chirkinian was known for his award-winning coverage of the Masters Tournament. He won four Emmys and two Peabody awards for his work, which Jack Nicklaus said turned the Masters on television “into theater.”

JACK MILES

MARCH 6

A former Richmond County school athletic director, Miles was also a Richmond County Commission member, serving as chairman in 1984. A World War II veteran, he served in the Army Air Corps.

THE REV. BILL REESE

MARCH 7

For 54 years, “Preacher Bill” Reese ministered the congregation he founded at Lakeside Baptist Church in Aiken County. Under Reese, the church grew to support more than 100 missionaries worldwide.

A.L. WILLIAMS

MARCH 9

One of the most successful baseball coaches in Georgia history, Williams led the Academy of Richmond County to seven state titles. The school’s baseball field is named for Williams, who was also a World War II combat veteran and former prisoner of war.

PEN MAYSON

MARCH 12

A former Augusta City Council member, Mayson also served as president of Historic Augusta, Main Street Augusta and the Augusta Symphony League. He served on the boards of the Augusta Metro Chamber of Com­merce, United Way, Salvation Army and Red Cross.

TOMMY DUNBAR

MARCH 16

Dunbar reached the major leagues as a slugging outfielder for the Texas Rangers in the 1980s. When his career ended, he was known back home in Aiken as a coach who enjoyed working with young people.

CARL LANGLEY

MARCH 25

A longtime Augusta and Aiken newspaper reporter and editor, Langley spent 45 years working for The Augusta Chronicle, Augusta Herald and Aiken Standard. He had a talent for storytelling that showed throughout his work. He was also mayor of New Ellenton for eight years.

MARGARET RAMSEY

APRIL 3

Ramsey was a retired nurse, folk artist and storyteller who loved children and loved teaching them art, said her friends and family. Her art was featured at the Morris Museum of Art, and some of it is in the private collection of former President Carter.

NORMAN SIMOWITZ

APRIL 2

Simowitz was a Richmond County Commission member and its chairman in the 1970s. Although a Democrat, he was credited with pushing through reforms that made elections fair for Republicans.

SAM SIBLEY JR.

APRIL 5

A former district attorney for the Augusta Judicial Circuit, Sibley spent his last years as the circuit’s first public defender. In that role, he managed a staff of lawyers, standing up for the rights of poor people accused in crimes.

IRA DAVIS

JUNE 18

A government “watchdog” who rarely missed a Richmond County government meeting, Davis influenced local lawmakers through much of the 1970s and ’80s. He was president of the Richmond County Property Owners Association and a strong advocate for limiting government and taxes.

ALBERTA GOLDBERG

JUNE 14

Goldberg served more than 10 years as the program director for Augusta Jewish Community Center. The Sisterhood of Adas Yeshurun Synagogue honored her as 1997 Woman of the Year. Hadassah, a national women’s Zionist group, awarded her the National Leadership Award in 1998.

CARRIE ADAMSON

JULY 6

A local historian, Adamson was the founder and lifetime honorary president of the Augusta Genealogical Society. She also served on many local boards, from the Committee for Augusta 250th Year Celebration to the president of the Fort Gordon Officers’ Wives Club.

FRAMPTON TOOLE JR.

JULY 10

A successful Aiken lawyer, Toole also served terms in the South Carolina Legislature as both a senator and representative. In Aiken, he was past city solicitor and a former president of the chamber of commerce and Rotary Club. Toole also served on the University of South Carolina board of trustees.

LUTHER WELSH

JULY 14

A beloved football coach at Thomson High School, Welsh led the Bulldogs to 11 region titles and three state championships in 19 seasons. He was remembered as a hard-working coach with a tender heart who coached 333 victories over his successful career.

PAT HARDAWAY

JULY 15

Hardaway was judge of Columbia County Probate Court for more than 30 years. She also dispensed justice in the county’s traffic court and was active in promoting the county’s history.

BERTHA LEE BATTEY TOOLE

JULY 24

Toole was a founding member of the Augusta Assembly. She also served on the board of the Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art and was president of the Augusta Symphony Guild. She was chairwoman of the Augusta Cotillion and president of St. Mary’s Home and School Association.

LINDA BEAZLEY

SEPT. 12

Longtime director of Richmond County Board of Elections, Beazley was considered one of the state’s most successful voting experts. She was named interim county administrator three different times, and in 1996 she was named co-administrator when the city and county consolidated.

J.D. PAUGH

OCT. 23

A well-liked motorcycle policeman for Richmond County Sheriff’s Office, Paugh’s death in the line of duty inspired an overwhelming community outpouring of love and respect. Thousands turned out for his funeral, where he was remembered for a fun-loving personality and many acts of simple kindness.

GARY BUSSEY SR.

OCT. 24

The former executive director of the CSRA Business League, Bussey was fatally wounded in Atlanta during an altercation, police said. He had left Augusta to take a position at the Georgia Department of Human Resources in its Fatherhood program.

THE REV. JAMES ADKINS

OCT. 29

Chaplain for the Augusta Police Department and Richmond County Sheriff’s Office for 41 years, Adkins also served as pastor of Woodlawn Baptist Church on Walton Way. “Dad had a servant’s heart. His commitment was to help people,” recalled his son Jim Adkins Jr.

EUGENIA TOOLE GLOVER

NOV. 4

Considered one of the world’s best organists, Toole first gained notice as organist for Trinity on the Hill Methodist Church at age 12. She helped found the music department at today’s Augusta State University and also wrote the school’s alma mater. She studied and performed in New York and Indiana.

JAMES CARMICHAEL

NOV. 12

An Augusta native, Carmichael was an internationally known wildlife photographer. He published several books, such as The Audubon Field Guide to North American Shells, with Dr. Harold A. Rehder. He was also known for his photographs of seashells.

ROBERT E. GRAY

NOV. 23

Rising to the rank of lieutenant general, Gray was chief of the U.S. Army’s Signal Corps and Fort Gordon’s first black commander. He was known for his talent for organization and innovation. After his retirement he lived in the Augusta area and was active in community affairs.

THOMAS GAMBLIN

NOV. 24

A popular teacher and cross country coach at the Academy of Richmond County, Gamblin died Thanksgiving Day after collapsing during a run. His death stunned those who knew him at the school where he also had taught psychology, sociology and coached football and swimming.

BOB BAURLE

DEC. 10

When it came to fishing on the Savannah River below New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam, they said Bob Baurle was man who knew everything. Over this years, he gained such a solid reputation among anglers that the recreation department named the public boat ramp in his honor.

SCOTTY RICHARDSON

DEC. 21

A master safety officer for the Aiken Department of Public Safety, Richardson became the first Aiken policeman slain in the line of duty in almost half a century. He was praised as a father, husband and officer who loved and served the community where he graduated from high school and college.

PRESTON LEWIS

DEC. 25

A respected lawyer in Waynesboro, Ga., Lewis served six terms in the Georgia Legislature and one in the state Senate. He was active in civic affairs and presided for many years as Juvenile Court judge in Burke County. He was also a decorated Army combat veteran of the Korean War.


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