MOX report to Congress is six months overdue

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The National Nuclear Security Administration is more than six months late on its annual status report to Congress on the mixed oxide fuel project at Savannah River Site.

The document, mandated under the 2003 National Defense Authorization Act, was due Feb. 15 and was to include updated details on the $4.8 billion project’s construction progress and completion schedule, among other things.

Critics of the project say the delay is another sign the government’s program to dispose of surplus plutonium from dismantled nuclear bombs could be facing more problems.

“Failure to deliver this required report reveals that the Department of Energy does not know if the MOX plant construction will be completed and if the facility will ever operate,” said Tom Clements, Southeastern Nuclear Campaign Coordinator with Friends of the Earth.

The mixed oxide, or MOX plant, is designed to dispose of 34 metric tons of plutonium by blending the material with uranium to make commercial reactor fuel. Efforts to find utilities willing to use the fuel have progressed slowly.

In June, the House Appropriations Committee expressed new concerns about the project’s escalating costs and the quest to find clients for the fuel.

“The costs of this program continue to escalate, with current estimates of as much as $9.7 billion, just to construct the needed facilities,” committee members wrote in the fiscal 2012 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill.

Although the Tennessee Valley Authority is exploring its use in as many as five of its reactors, the recent crisis with Japan’s nuclear program will make such an alliance less likely, and much more difficult, the committee wrote.

Josh McConaha, a spokesman for the National Nuclear Security Administration, said officials are diligently working on the report. “The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility report is currently in progress and will be submitted to Congress as soon as it is completed,” he said.

Reach Rob Pavey at rob.pavey@augustachronicle.com
or (706) 868-122 Ext. 119

Comments (5) Add comment
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glennfulghum
0
Points
glennfulghum 09/12/11 - 02:43 pm
1
0
My bet is that MOX will never

My bet is that MOX will never start production on any scale other than testing. It is a big waste just like Yucca Mountain, which was stopped by the President to get Harry Reed re-elected.

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 09/12/11 - 07:37 pm
0
0
It's only six months late.

It's only six months late. Hey, what's the big deal? And, after all, it only involves nuclear materials.

Riverman1
84076
Points
Riverman1 09/12/11 - 08:30 pm
0
0
Craig, yeah, what's six

Craig, yeah, what's six months? The stuff will be around for a couple of million years.

exmox
5
Points
exmox 09/13/11 - 09:06 pm
1
0
Once again it is being proved

Once again it is being proved what a "cash cow" the MOX project is. You still have the French stretching everything out the project because they are getting a ton of money and perks that you wouldn't believe. Why would they want to go back to a oh hum living.
You still have over 10 thousand "change notices" that get added on every day. Most were generated because the sub-projects were forced out the door with known wrong information. The management there was and is the worse I have ever seen. I am glad to be out of that area. When it fails, it will be a mess.
But this government will keep on adding our money to this mess.

SCEagle Eye
914
Points
SCEagle Eye 04/17/12 - 10:02 am
1
0
Has the legally required MOX

Has the legally required MOX report for 2011 or for 2012 been delivered to Congress? If not, how can officials get away with ignoring the law and is Congress demanding immediate compliance??

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