Marchers unite against violence in community

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One year ago, Robin Fuewell experienced every mother's worst nightmare. Her youngest son, Brandon Taylor, 16, was shot and killed. Fuewell said she's struggled to cope with making sense of her son's death, and some days are better than others.

Saturday's March Against Violence started at the Augusta Library as a silent walk but became a rally at Jessye Norman Amphitheater. The organizer said more programs will follow.   Michael Holahan/Staff
Michael Holahan/Staff
Saturday's March Against Violence started at the Augusta Library as a silent walk but became a rally at Jessye Norman Amphitheater. The organizer said more programs will follow.

Wearing a T-shirt with Brandon's picture on the front and the words "We have his back" on the back, Fuewell joined about 250 people Saturday morning in the March Against Violence in downtown Augusta and shared her story afterwards in a rally at the Jessye Norman Amphitheater.

The march came one week after those accused of killing her son appeared in court.

"I sat in the courtroom and looked at those two boys and wept for them," Fuewell said, her eyes brimming with tears. "Something has to be missing in their life to want to hurt somebody like that. I don't understand them wanting to kill anyone. I want them to be punished to the highest extent of the law. But at the same time, I want to hug them."

The "something missing" is what organizer Patricia Hicks is trying to fill. Hicks organized the event in cooperation with Pastor Angela Harden of New Destiny Ministry. Hicks said Saturday's march was a kickoff to a movement of many programs.

"I'm a parole officer," Hicks said. "And what I see every day really shows that these kids need intervention."

Though nothing has been finalized, Hicks said plans are in the works for mentoring programs and a 24-hour refuge where people can come in off the streets and feel safe.

Many carried posters during the quiet walk, which began in front of the Augusta Library, went up Eighth Street, and became a rally at the amphitheater.

There, Leroy Crew lead the crowd in "Stop the violence" chants, pastors Cornell Harris, and Jonavan Harris spoke and church music groups performed.

"I think it's great," Anthony Wade said. "I came because of all the violence that's been going on around here. It needs to stop. And if not me, then somebody's got to do it."

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corgimom
34064
Points
corgimom 06/25/11 - 10:35 am
0
0
Looking at that picture, I

Looking at that picture, I see women and children. Where are the male role models? Where are the pastors? Why aren't any commissioners or the Mayor involved in this? Why aren't any white people participating in this?

Or do people just not care about these senseless killings, because the victims are poor and black?

WW1949
19
Points
WW1949 06/25/11 - 10:37 am
0
0
I hope it works. Too many in

I hope it works. Too many in that area lean toward violence against the good people that live there. Just this week a mans door was kicked in by a large man. When the homeowner confronted him he ran towards a waiting car in front and left. He should have left with a leak.

seenitB4
90795
Points
seenitB4 06/25/11 - 10:45 am
0
0
Great thing to do......walk

Great thing to do......walk on Broad St. too...maybe some will open their eyes.....Houston we have a problem.

TK3
562
Points
TK3 06/25/11 - 11:07 am
0
0
Armed home owners can put the

Armed home owners can put the breaks on a lot of the breaking into homes/home invasions and stickups. Also lowering the age and extending hours teens allowed to work and dropping the govt' forced minimum wage would get a lot of teens off the street and to work. Flame on.

Riverman1
86917
Points
Riverman1 06/25/11 - 11:09 am
0
0
When 250 concerned citizens

When 250 concerned citizens march for a cause like this, the mayor should be leading them. Where is Mayor Copenhaver-Boardman?

seenitB4
90795
Points
seenitB4 06/25/11 - 11:12 am
0
0
I wonder what countyman would

I wonder what countyman would say to these walkers!!

Patty-P
3516
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Patty-P 06/25/11 - 11:26 am
0
0
This is exactly what was

This is exactly what was needed for the community. Wish they could have gotten the word out sooner about this event, and gotten the support of the 'leaders' of the community as well.

charliemanson
1
Points
charliemanson 06/25/11 - 01:16 pm
0
0
Corgi: the pastors, mayor,

Corgi: the pastors, mayor, commissioners, etc are having a "gay" time.

countyman
20588
Points
countyman 06/25/11 - 05:55 pm
0
0
The article says churches

The article says churches provided the music and I'm sure pastors were there.. The chronicle may have just put the quote up.. I would simply tell the people god bless and keep up the good work.. I understand marching through downtown because it draws attention.. The Augusta Pride Parade & Festival is today and the Saturday Market.. The Riverwalk is also a nice area to hold an event..

I do think however you have to take the problem head on sometimes.. People need to march around the sketchy sides of Harrisburg an Laney Walker... East Augusta, Turpin Hill, Sunset, Southside, Olive rd, Hyde Park, and Bethlehem...

The commissioner Matt Aitken worked with some local churches on the Day in the Community Block Party.. The event happened earlier this month and brought the communities of Olde Town and East Augusta together...
http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/metro/2011-06-02/block-party-help-area

The mayor has been involved with marches/meetings held in the past..

AutumnLeaves
8450
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AutumnLeaves 06/25/11 - 01:44 pm
0
0
Murder victims in Augusta are

Murder victims in Augusta are not all poor and black.

AutumnLeaves
8450
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AutumnLeaves 06/25/11 - 01:50 pm
0
0
Corgimom, the last parade I

Corgimom, the last parade I went to in that area was a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. parade. My family and I were the only people that were not black I could see anywhere around, except for the dignitaries in the viewing stand. I wonder what Dr. King would think of that. I walked the entire route next to the parade and was made to feel very unwelcome. I never went to another MLKing parade in Augusta. I can't blame white people for skipping it, if they were made to feel as unwelcome as I did, or if they saw the "dancers" for one of the local bands. But that's another topic.

double_standard
166
Points
double_standard 06/25/11 - 02:28 pm
0
0
Autumn you probably felt like

Autumn you probably felt like a black person at a civil war reenactment.

allhans
24009
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allhans 06/25/11 - 05:14 pm
0
0
What a difference in the two

What a difference in the two events held on the same day. Our hope is that the March against Violence have great success...our prayers are with you and yours. It is good to see the children taking an active role, God Bless You all.

wondersnevercease
9218
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wondersnevercease 06/26/11 - 08:12 am
0
0
Oh it's a wonderful daY...
Unpublished

Oh it's a wonderful daY...

Crime Reports and Rewards TV
33
Points
Crime Reports and Rewards TV 06/25/11 - 06:28 pm
0
0
They rocked the Amphitheater.

They rocked the Amphitheater. Got one of their best songs on video, wish I could have made the march too but had to meet with an insurance adjuster on storm damage. Who all was behind this so we can get with them to do this again, with more notice to everyone? This should have been HUGE but few heard about it until the last minute..

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 06/25/11 - 06:39 pm
0
0
I agree Crime Reports...they

I agree Crime Reports...they didn't mention it until the last minute. I think this was a wonderful idea and much needed.

seenitB4
90795
Points
seenitB4 06/26/11 - 08:52 am
0
0
GREAT IDEA......Put the word

GREAT IDEA......Put the word out next time & I'm sure more people will be there.....Thanks for taking a stand on important issues in Richmond county---maybe some will run for office in the next years because you KNOW more than the people in office now-----Thank you-thank you thankyou!

hounddog
0
Points
hounddog 06/26/11 - 09:50 am
0
0
Leaders in the black
Unpublished

Leaders in the black communities and black churches have to address what they have created over the last 30 years. They have taught young blacks the entitlement mentally and along with liberal politicians destroyed black family structure.

david jennings
624
Points
david jennings 06/26/11 - 11:05 am
0
0
Thanks A Leaves,I dont like

Thanks A Leaves,I dont like the poor and black excuse.Im white and my (pretty much)entiire family have been relatively poor and uneducated(high school).Ive managed to make it sixty two years without a criminal record.I also lost a Brother and my Dad in 1995 to senseless violent crime.I consider my self very fortunate to have had a Mom and Dad that didnt drink and were good parents.I believe that is the first requirement in a Family.

iLove
626
Points
iLove 06/26/11 - 11:28 am
0
0
Rev. Angels Harden has a
Unpublished

Rev. Angels Harden has a radio show on 94.7. his event was a weekend long event also with a Stop the Violence Concert @ the Imperial. William McDowell, a well known gospel aritst performed, as did many other local gospel talents.

The event was described as a Stop the Violence alter call.

ONLY IF IT WERE ADVERTISED MORE...

3 majro events nwere going on downtown AT ONE TIME. . . . yet Augusta is uncool...lol, lol.

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