Annual event is canceled

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The motorcycle stunt shows, helicopters, skydivers and fireworks won't be thundering into Augusta this year.

Fireworks were shot over the Savannah River during last year's Thunder Over Augusta. The city's annual Armed Forces Day event has been canceled this year because of construction.   Corey Perrine/Staff
Corey Perrine/Staff
Fireworks were shot over the Savannah River during last year's Thunder Over Augusta. The city's annual Armed Forces Day event has been canceled this year because of construction.

Thunder Over Augusta, the city's Armed Forces Day celebration, will take a break in 2011. Donnie Thompson, an organizer of the event, said the TEE Center construction would have made it difficult to use Reynolds Street, as in years past.

"The TEE Center is actually being built on a lot that we used as a parking lot, so everything has been disrupted," Thompson said.

Augusta's is one of the largest Armed Forces Day celebrations ever seen, officers stationed at Fort Gordon have said. Highlights include a joint service color guard marching through the Augusta Common, live music, a freestyle motor cross stunt show, precision freefall parachute demonstrations, and an evening fireworks display.

Thunder Over Augusta is expected to return in 2012.

"As long as the construction is finished, we will be back," Thompson said. "Or, we're considering moving it to Fort Gordon."

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sueboo418
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sueboo418 05/06/11 - 01:39 pm
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That's a shame, this was a

That's a shame, this was a great event and tribute to all of our military. Surely, there is somewhere else around here that would or could house this wonderful event to honor these men and women who serve our country.

Dixieman
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Dixieman 05/06/11 - 03:50 pm
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Shame!! We need this. Let's

Shame!!
We need this. Let's make sure we get it back on in 2012!

augusta citizen
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augusta citizen 05/06/11 - 05:48 pm
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That's too bad, hope it will

That's too bad, hope it will return next year.

JesusSavesAtCitiBank
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JesusSavesAtCitiBank 05/06/11 - 06:22 pm
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I wish this wasn't cancelled

I wish this wasn't cancelled as well. It was fun time for families and a way to show support for the troops. But I swear the way some of you are acting...cancelling this is amount to supporting Satan himself. Though I do support the troops I think the military worship has gotten out of hand.

http://www.examiner.com/political-buzz-in-national/worship-of-the-us-mil...

The elevation of the US military to a position of Church of War, and the generals to its initiated high priests, with the notion that every soldier becomes a "hero" for obeying any order, no matter how stupid and heinous, is just one symptom of the dumbing-down and thuggishness of America.

In fact, the nation's war dead are always mourned for having "sacrificed" instead of "wasted" their lives in the endless military misadventures to which the nation commits them. After eight years of being ordered by George Bush into one hopelessly misguided war after another, American troops are exhausted, physically and emotionally; and the nation has exhausted any moral capital it ever possessed as the piles of dead "collaterals" build a ghastly monument to the viciousness and barbarism of American Terror War policy.

As traumatic as 9/11 was to the nation's psychic health, the reaction to it was exactly like that one might expect from some wounded, savage, animal. When thoughtful, reflective, and especially critical, insight was offered in the days and weeks after the 9/11 attack, it was not merely ignored, but was vilified as unpatriotic anti-American hate speech.

Yet, the terror that enabled the savage reaction, the pride which naturally went with sending the hundreds of thousands of potential "sacrifices" off to do battle with the nameless, faceless enemy, put America at risk of losing its soul. And that soul is not to be found in battlefields and graveyards of fallen soldiers and their victims, but instead is to be found in the things more and more Americans hate today—big ideas.

The big ideas, like religious freedom for everyone, including Muslims, are in some respects rooted in Christian principles, such as loving (instead of killing) one's enemy, and in the case of freedom of religion were included in the Bill of Rights primarily because the horrific European wars of religion, fought between different brands of Christianity, were fresh on the minds of the founders of the USA.

The Bush regime, while perpetrating one of the most terrible string of war crimes in the history of the nation, using US intelligence services and the US military to kidnap, torture, and murder thousands of innocent people, looked on the United States Constitution as a hateful document, which limited their ability to wage their wars in the most ruthless way possible.

So vicious were the passions that Bush and his regime whipped up in the country, that they created an essential distrust in millions of Americans for what had been the most cherished document, the US Constitution, the very document that the US military and the President take an oath to protect and defend.

The time has come when the complexities of the world, combined with the deficiencies of understanding on the part of the American people regarding what are the truly important aspects of their traditional national character, are mutating the American soul into a monster, one which can only be fit to serve the interests of a fearful and dangerous empire.

One essential remedy to this threat to the existence of the republic is the return of the basic distrust of "standing armies" and the military that used to be a default position for Americans. Unless we will surrender to the notion that we are all soldiers in the imperial ventures of madmen, we must return to the time when military power is seen as an unfortunate, limited and seldom-used instrument of policy, when all other means have failed.

"A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty."—James Madison

http://www.examiner.com/political-buzz-in-national/worship-of-the-us-mil...

InChristLove
22473
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InChristLove 05/06/11 - 06:49 pm
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Citibank, you just hit a new

Citibank, you just hit a new all time low. Unbelievable.

Every dead solider is mourned because they have sacrificed - not wasted their lives...........and it's not military worship it's called honor, something I fear you know nothing about.

May God Bless our men and women in the armed forces!!

augusta citizen
9398
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augusta citizen 05/06/11 - 09:29 pm
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Citibank, what??? 3 comments

Citibank, what??? 3 comments before yours, one to two sentences each.
Then your comment, "...But I swear the way some of you are acting...cancelling this is amount to supporting Satan himself." You then write 11 paragraphs with links. Um, who is going overboard here? Just saying. How was any other poster "acting"??? By the way "...this is amount to supporting Satan himself" how does amount fit into this sentence?

Riverman1
84272
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Riverman1 05/07/11 - 11:27 am
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I wonder how those advanced

I wonder how those advanced reservations for events at the TEE center are going? About 6 months ago they said they had one event scheduled so far.

LiveAndLetLive
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LiveAndLetLive 05/07/11 - 11:45 am
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I do not often post on here,

I do not often post on here, and I have even more rarely posted comments directly to what others have said on here. With that said, CityBank has a point about our country's obsession with War. Mind you, this is not meant as to dishonor what our troops have fought for and for which some, have given the ultimate sacrifice: their lives. Defending our country with military action should always be a very last resort. But many government office holders and seekers, both Democratic and Republican, use this tactic as a means of receiving campaign contributions from wealthy defense contractors and then, once in office, resort to utilizing the military industrial complex as a tool of diplomacy. This needs to stop. We need to redirect our resources and begin to fundamentally rebuild our country. Educationally, emotionally, and yes, morally. These are the foundations on which our country was built. We fight for our freedom on the battlefield, but also in our streets. We are first and foremost Americans. Let us act like Americans and be the leader the world needs to evolve toward a better life for ours and future generations. Not another Global Empire destined to collapse under its own weight as history has proved, over and over again. We must build a Democracy, not a Theocracy. We must build roads and bridges, not tanks and missiles. We must employ more teachers and grow our country, not tear it apart with the internal power struggle that has lasted for much too long. Let's look at things in a broader perspective and understand who we are and what we want to become.

fftaz71
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fftaz71 05/07/11 - 11:54 am
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Citibank...maybe you should

Citibank...maybe you should align yourself with Westboro Baptist Church. If you think those who spend their time in the military are "wasting" their lives, you are sadly mistaken about military life. Its not all about war in the military. These have been the best and hardest past 4 yrs of my life...I am a military spouse. I wouldnt trade my current life for anything. Our lives have been far from wasted. My husband has been in the military for 11 yrs now and is finally going to college, he is more confident, more assertive, and most of all, he enjoys what he does. Oh, one more thing...since he joined the military, his faith has grown exponentially.
You claim acknowledgement of Armed Forces day is a hero worship....what it really is, is a thank you. The people who organize this understand the sacrifices of a military family. Believe me when I say you cannot say the things you said and claim to understand what military life is like. Moving every 3 yrs, saying good bye to new friends, finding a new job every time we move, etc. is hard but, the positive side of this is that we have a lot of friends in many places if we want to go on vacation, staying competitive for a job means I continue my education, and I will go places and do things I would have never done if it wasnt for the fact that I married a sailor. Its not a wasted life unless you do nothing with it.

JesusSavesAtCitiBank
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JesusSavesAtCitiBank 05/07/11 - 02:38 pm
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I was not disrespecting the

I was not disrespecting the troops. I just think we worship them and going to war too much. That's all. I come from a military family so don't any of you dare tell me to align myself with the likes of Fred Phelps. That wasn't what I was trying to say at all. Apparently none of you read past the first few sentences of the second paragraph.

It is so hard to find a balancing act between protesting military policies while supporting our individual troops who are mostly motivated by love of country and service. I really believe that fear (Vietnam Vet treatment) has kept most of us largely silent in fear of hurting our troops. Yes, we had a lesson to learn about treatment of troops but that lesson should not have included fear of voicing our displeasure in war.

All of your bantering is actually a demonstration of the very problem I was writing about. So pious is the esteem accorded to people in the military, just because they expose themselves to danger in following the often terrible orders of our leaders, that there is fear in criticizing the very wars that are placing them in danger in the first place.

Many US troops, and no telling how many civilians, in other words the innocent collateral killed by the troops, could have been saved if Americans had been less respectful of hurting the feelings of troops, and more concerned with having their country employ their military in a decent and honorable manner, which it certainly has not been in the Terror Wars.

Eisenhower warned us about the military industrial complex...we didn't listen. Now our men and women in uniform today are paying for it. Civilians are paying for it.

JesusSavesAtCitiBank
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JesusSavesAtCitiBank 05/07/11 - 02:42 pm
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I'm no expert on this issue,

I'm no expert on this issue, but I am a liberal, so bear with me. Every time some conservative has SOMETHING IMPORTANT to say about how great our military is, it always comes back to how grateful us liberals should be that the military "secured our freedom to dissent". Take this example:

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/opinion/200291577...

Editor, The Times:

I believe nature seeks balance. Thus there must be as many right-wing dolts as left-wing ones. So I don't worry much about the antics of the anti-military folks trying to ban recruiters from Seattle schools <"Initiative targets military recruiting," Times, Local news, April 4>.

Nevertheless, it's important to point out the, mmm, difficulties with their point of view.

First, they obviously don't see the irony of trying to ban representatives of the very people who secure their freedom to be fools. Their prejudice reminds me of another ugly bigotry, where once upon a time people allowed customers of a particular race — as long as they used the back door.

Also, when we face a real enemy on our soil, I'm sure they'll be the first to scream, "Where's the military?" Especially if the president is Republican. They'll conveniently "forget" they tried to get rid of it altogether.

— Bal Simon, Bellevue

If by 'secure' my 'freedom' you are referring to the Revolutionary War, OK. And World War 2 but after that there hasn't been any good reason for "securing my freedom" in my lifetime. Korea? Vietnam? Grenada? Iraq? puh leez!

How come Costa Rica doesn't have a military and no freedom-haters invade?

How much freedom could we secure if we didn't spend this much on our bloated military that we worship without question?

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&add...

Riverman1
84272
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Riverman1 05/07/11 - 02:41 pm
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"My good friends, this is the

"My good friends, this is the second time in our history that there has come back from Germany to Downing Street peace with honour. I believe it is peace for our time. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts. And now I recommend you to go home and sleep quietly in your beds." Neville Chamberlain Sept. 30, 1938

JesusSavesAtCitiBank
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JesusSavesAtCitiBank 05/07/11 - 02:45 pm
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For the record everyone: I

For the record everyone:

I have a brother in the Air Force, my uncle was in the Army, my Grandpa was in the Army during the Viet Nam conflict, and my Great Grandpa was killed June 8, 1944 in France. Coming from a long line of soldiers, I have a good perspective of the military mindset, and I am not a fan. While I appreciate what my ancestors had to do to secure the freedoms I enjoy, I am appalled that humanity has not progressed further than the need to solve national disputes with catastrophic violence. My general view of our soldiers is then this: they are doing a dirty job that unfortunately must be occasionally done. While I honor those who contended in operations which genuinely protected my freedoms, I do not give universal adulation to all who don a uniform, and especially not to those who behave as though I owe them some special service. It disturbs me greatly when certain people make comments suggesting that I am undeserving of my citizenship in the USA simply because I don’t defer to those in uniform.

Riverman1
84272
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Riverman1 05/07/11 - 02:54 pm
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In every society the

In every society the protectors of the people, the soldiers, are honored. We are no different than other nations throughout history. Veterans enjoy benefits as a measure of payback for what they did for us.

There has always been room for conscientious objectors, too, even during WWII, Korea and Vietnam. In the all volunteer Army it's not even necessary to have some identified as conscientious objectors. No one is denigrating those who haven't served in the military.

Pu239
284
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Pu239 05/07/11 - 05:38 pm
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I wonder if some people have
Unpublished

I wonder if some people have an honest thought of their own...or if they just adsorb and regurgitate the (insert political affiliations here) talking points without any introspective analysis, or maybe they are simply TROLLS…

fftaz71
108
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fftaz71 05/07/11 - 10:35 pm
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You cant have it both ways

You cant have it both ways Citibank. My father, my grandfathers, all my uncles and 3 cousins served, but until I married someone in the military and lived the life, I had no idea of all the sacrifices the soldiers make. Yes, its a volunteer military...blah blah blah. Your own words said that those in the military are wasting their lives. You cannot say you support the troops in one breath and then say they are wasting their lives in the military in the next. THEY dont believe they are wasting their lives. So the city wants to put on a festival on Armed Forces day...that hardly equates to worship- you dont have to go down there and participate if you dont want to. Nobody suggested you are undeserving of US citizenship either....nice job trying to put words in peoples mouths.

smartie
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smartie 05/08/11 - 10:55 am
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so? in other words, citibank?

so? in other words, citibank? unlike your cousins, brothers, others, you would be a draft dodger? i guess it's ok for you to get on this forum and spat off your weak, spineless opinions. it's just hard for me to understand what makes an american come to form this opinion of our own country. simply put, when the little bully approached me on the playground, i punched him right in his mouth. never really had much problem with him after that. and, come to think of it, the one that whined to the teacher, well, he got his butt whipped down the road, after school.

Boogaloo
1
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Boogaloo 05/08/11 - 02:38 pm
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Some very good comments here,

Some very good comments here, for the most part. As a Vietnam vet (1969-70) I can understand what CitiBank is saying. I was a gung-ho 18 yr old when I went to the RVN to help support in the "fight for freedom" against the wicked "commies". Upon arriving in country I encountered the largely apathetic locals who could care less about "democracy" but were more interested in the "you buy for me" Tide detergent, Salem cigarettes and Martel cognac that the PX had to offer.
The brand of democracy they were used to was by their leader, Thieu, who was a corrupt US puppet. Was it any wonder then when I approached our own troops who were leaving and whose place I was taking, that their comment was to just "cover your azz and live to get out of here". There was no sense of the idealistic "fighting for freedom" because it didn't exist except in the minds of many Americans who were comfortable sitting home watching Marcus Welby and hating the anti-war movement.
If you doubt what I have to say about the average South Vietnamese willingness to "fight for freedom", just look at the chaos that ensued when they realized that the "GI" was not going to be around to supply them anymore. If you want freedom then you fight for it and don't expect the US to bring it to you. If your cause is just, you will prevail in the end.

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