41 area overpasses defective

Metro Augusta drivers cross unsound bridges daily, assessment says

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If you're in one of the 5,000 vehicles that cross the Willis Foreman Road bridge over Spirit Creek daily, here's something you might want to know:

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The Willis Foreman Road bridge over Spirit Creek in Hephzibah is the most structurally unsound bridge in Richmond County.   Corey Perrine/Staff
Corey Perrine/Staff
The Willis Foreman Road bridge over Spirit Creek in Hephzibah is the most structurally unsound bridge in Richmond County.

It is the most structurally unsound bridge in Richmond County.

In fact, chances are that most motorists in Augusta and surrounding counties cross structurally deficient bridges every day in their communities without knowing it. The odds of that being the case, according to the most recent assessment of the American Society of Civil Engineers, is about 1 in 5.

In Richmond County, 17 bridges were considered structurally defective -- a rating at or below 50. In Columbia County, three bridges were considered functionally obsolete, and 21 were deemed defective in Aiken County.

That they are structurally deficient doesn't mean the bridges are on the verge of collapse. It means the bridge is subpar -- because of physical condition, the materials used in construction, traffic overload or outdated design -- and needs repair or replacement.

In Georgia, 21 percent of the bridges are considered structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, according to the civil engineers' 2009 study of data from two years earlier. South Carolina's bridges scored even worse, at 23 percent.

Of approximately 600,000 highway bridges in the United States, about 160,000 are either deficient or obsolete, said Andy Herrmann, a bridge engineer who is the president-elect of the American Society of Civil Engineers. While it doesn't mean the bridges are unsafe, it does mean weight and speed restrictions combined with immediate repairs are needed or the bridges should be closed, Herrmann said.

It's rare for a bridge to fail, which is good and bad, he said. It's good because it means engineers closely inspect and rate bridges to protect the public. It's bad because everyone becomes complacent, preferring to ignore deterioration than spend the money needed to make repairs and replacements.

The last major bridge failure in the U.S. happened Aug. 1, 2007, when the Interstate 35 westbound span over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis collapsed, killing 13 people and injuring 145. This year, the state and the companies that built and designed the bridge paid out more than $100 million to settle lawsuits.

Before the bridge collapsed -- and the state was in the process of major repairs -- the bridge had a sufficiency rating of 50 on the Structure Inventory and Appraisal of the Nation's Bridges.

AT THE BOTTOM end of the rating among Richmond County bridges is the one crossing Spirit Creek on Willis Foreman Road, which came in at 7. The city is in the process of replacing the bridge, which was built in 1950.

The initial cost estimate was $9 million to replace that bridge. There is $16 million available from the Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax for bridge repairs and replacement, according to Dennis Stroud, an assistant director in the city's public works department.

The state owns many of the bridges in the Augusta area and has plans in various stages to take care of deficient bridges, said Mike Keene, the area engineer for the Georgia Department of Transportation in this area.

The cost of repairs or replacement can range from $200,000 for a short span to the $200 million price tag that came with the new interchange bridge at Interstate 20 and I-520.

A bridge over Walton Branch on Georgia Highway 232 (Columbia Road) is in the design phase for replacement in 2014 at a cost of $11 million to $12 million. Its score was 66 out of 100.

Some of the ratings can be deceiving, Keene said. The bridge where Georgia Highway 150 crosses I-20 in McDuffie County was rated at 20.1. The state does not plan to replace it, however, because it is fine structurally. It has a weight limit, but it is set high. With some maintenance and concrete repairs, Keene said that 20.1 rating would increase to 70.

Anytime an engineer sees cracking during a bridge inspection, it's going to be flagged, Keene said. The problem is that water can seep through the cracks to the inner layer of steel and cause rusting -- which weakens the steel. However, it can take 30 years of rusting to cause steel to break.

THE MOST COMMON reason for a bridge closure is a vehicle hitting the bridge, Keene said.

Bridges deemed obsolete are judged incapable of handling the traffic passing over them. The I-20 bridges over the Savannah River both scored about 45 in the most recent inspections. Nearly 52,000 vehicles pass over the 45-year-old bridges daily.

Georgia plans to replace the bridges and the I-20 bridge over the Augusta Canal in 2015, Keene said. The bridges really need to be six lanes across the Savannah River to handle the traffic. A preliminary cost estimate is $50 million.

The American Society of Civil Engineers' 2009 Report Card gave the country's infrastructure a "D" grade -- the same grade it handed out in 2005.

The difference, said Herrmann, who led the Report Card Committee, is how much it costs to make it right. In 2005, the estimate was $1.5 trillion. In 2009, it rose to $2.2 trillion.

"Things have lives," he said.

Things such as bridges and roads, dams and water systems that make up infrastructure only last so long. Putting off repairs and replacement just leads to the escalation of damage and the cost to make repairs or replacements, he said.

More than 83 percent of the Richmond County bridges rated as deficient or obsolete in 1997 were also found deficient or obsolete in 2007.

"Infrastructure makes our economy grow," Herrmann said.

President Obama pushed the stimulus package as one way for the country to fix the infrastructure and create jobs after the economy took a nosedive at the end of 2007. Building new bridges was supposed to be part of the plan.

The problem was that the stimulus money was set for "shovel ready" projects, which bridges typically are not.

"When it's time to build a bridge, we can't wait," Keene said.

Lowest rated

The 12 bridges with the lowest sufficiency ratings (scale 1-100) in the Augusta area are:

Georgia:

  • William Foreman Road bridge over Spirit Creek; built in 1950; average daily traffic is 5,000; sufficiency rating 7;
  • SR 232 (Columbia Road) over Walton Branch in Columbia County; built in 1948; average daily traffic is 9,040; sufficiency rating 13;
  • Range Road over Brier Creek at Fort Gordon; built in 1970; bridge is closed; sufficiency rating 17;
  • SR 43 over Little River in McDuffie County; built in 1952; average daily traffic 2,690; sufficiency rating 19.3
  • SR 150 over Interstate 20 in McDuffie County; built in 1966; average daily traffic 5,910; sufficiency rating 20.1;
  • Marks Church Road over Rae's Creek in Richmond County; built in 1975; average daily traffic 1,400; sufficiency rating 22.1;

South Carolina:

  • Old Charleston Road (S-33-38) over White Creek in McCormick County; built in 1975; average daily traffic 126; sufficiency rating 2;
  • York Street (S-2-31), northbound lane over Norfolk Southern railroad, abandoned, in Aiken County; built in 1993; average daily traffic 4,375; sufficiency rating 12;
  • Timmerman Road or Sleepy Creek Road (C-19-62) over Mountain Creek in Edgefield County; built in 1935; average daily traffic 60; sufficiency rating 16.2;
  • Lick Fork Road (C-19-263) over Lick Fork Creek in Edgefield County; built in 1991; average daily traffic 60; sufficiency rating 16.4;
  • Log Creek Road (S-19-114) over Log Creek in Edgefield County; built in 1940; average daily traffic 30; sufficiency rating 17;
  • Long Crane Road (C-19-645) over Sleepy Creek in Edgefield County; built in 1962; average daily traffic 126; sufficiency rating 17.7.

SOURCE: The American Society of Civil Engineers' 2009 Report Card of data compiled in 2007.

Closing a bridge

Officials have to weigh several factors when deciding whether to close a bridge, including:

  • The bridge's weight limit and rating
  • The type of traffic that uses the bridge (example: heavy trucks vs. light cars)
  • Whether there is an alternative route that heavier vehicles can use to bypass the area

Certain bridges are rated for certain types of traffic, and that rating is re-evaluated during by the Georgia DOT every two years. If the bridge cannot support nominal weights, typically five tons or less, the bridge is usually closed.

Source: Steve Cassell, Augusta Traffic Engineering Department; David Spear, Georgia Department of Transportation

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justus4
113
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justus4 11/28/10 - 01:16 am
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0
After reading this info, who
Unpublished

After reading this info, who is to blame for such poor planning and maintenance? The president? The VP? Maybe the citizens on welfare? Nope. Isn't that state controlled by republicans? How long have they been in charge? What kinda leadership do the failures in the article represent? At some point those fractures will fail and what innocent taxpayer will be traveling across it when it does? These bridges are in such poor conditions because the state agencies responsible has failed to plan. Politicians, who always yapping about "the american people" has failed in their duties to spend tax dollars in an effective manner. And it's not Washington, it's the governors and state representatives whose failed their state. Let's see how they spin this into a Washington-big government-takeover plot. Expect many excuses and no real leadership to protect drivers who cross those accidents-waiting-to-happen death traps. A very informative article.

grinder48
2054
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grinder48 11/28/10 - 06:16 am
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I'm suprised the old 5th
Unpublished

I'm suprised the old 5th Street bridge over the Savannah River's not on the low rated list, looks like it'll fall any minute.

grinder48
2054
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grinder48 11/28/10 - 06:29 am
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Let's see ... we have 160,000
Unpublished

Let's see ... we have 160,000 deficient or obsolete bridges. We have ~ 14.8 million people unemployed (per Dept of Labor, there's actually more). How many could be put to work rebuilding bridges? That turns into far more jobs than the actual construction workers, people have to manufacture and transport the materials, all the workers have to eat, their families buy clothes, etc. (Don't buy materials from foreign sources). To pay for it, build toll booths so those using the bridges would pay. More employment for those tending the booths.

Tisk tisk what is this world coming to
0
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0
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Wonder why the Chronicle

Wonder why the Chronicle didn't list all of the bridges in Richmond, Columbia, and Edgefield Counties? It is their usual half- @##$% job!

airbud7
1
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airbud7 11/28/10 - 07:43 am
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The American Society of Civil

The American Society of Civil Engineers' 2009 Report Card gave the country's infrastructure a "D" grade???

This is Bull!!!
I had a neighbor who is an Engineer at SRS who built a building in his backyard and he layed all the ceiling joists sideways (instead of upright)

Talk about stupid!!! (and he made 48 dollar's an hour)
Needless to say the roof is sagging worst than a rappers pants!
Go Figure???

Tisk tisk what is this world coming to
0
Points
0
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Justus4 these bridges haven't

Justus4 these bridges haven't fallen apart in the last 8 years. Good bridge building has been going on for over 50 years. If I remember correctly these bridges are inspected every year. Some of the bridges are maintained by the state and some by the county. This isn't a republican or a democrat issue neither is a racial issue. This is an issue of people not doing their jobs like they should and people padding their pockets rather than being concerned about public safety. You might try to study the issue before you comment on it.

utefann
0
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utefann 11/28/10 - 08:09 am
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I am sorry but I just don't

I am sorry but I just don't see 9 million dollars in repairs for the spirit creek bridge. Maybe a concise report on how they derived that figure would be the basis for a good news story.

usafvet
3
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usafvet 11/28/10 - 10:06 am
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The bridge in question on

The bridge in question on Willis Foreman has been on the list for some time. There have been patches made to the bridge several times, yet the city allows it to be a thoroughfare for its garbage service to the landfill. And justus4, it does take a while for the Republicans to address the many pitfalls and "changes" that occur when the democrats are so busy redistributing wealth and misappropriating funds.

usafvet
3
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usafvet 11/28/10 - 10:13 am
0
0
Seenit, Did you ever cross

Seenit, Did you ever cross the bridge on Willis Foreman? I was crossing it when it was made of wood and the road was dirt. Yep, the good ole days. Actually, I'm enjoying these more.

seenitB4
97447
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seenitB4 11/28/10 - 12:04 pm
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Vet...I was thinking of you

Vet...I was thinking of you when I read this article......yes I have been on the bridge & road MANY times.......my granma used to go to the springs on Windsor Spring Rd.(with her kin) to get the best water in the county---they believed in good quality water even back then in the 50s.....then we would travel the back roads of the county & visit some of the
old grave sites......not to mention Brier Creek area---their fishing spot...my mom was raised at Pine Hill area.....so yes I have seen this part of Richmond county..

dwb619
104151
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dwb619 11/28/10 - 05:03 pm
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grinder48, I like the way you

grinder48,
I like the way you think.

fatboyhog
2104
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fatboyhog 11/28/10 - 07:25 pm
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Justus, as far as I can

Justus, as far as I can determine, Georgia Governors, the ones who LEAD the state, have been Democrats from 1872-1999. I think that all the bridges deemed deficient were built and maintained during the course of their watch. Not that facts matter to you.

onlysane1left
223
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onlysane1left 11/29/10 - 09:57 am
0
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Gee, I guess I'm not the only

Gee, I guess I'm not the only sane one left. Yes, with unemployment as high, why cant we get this roads fixed just like Grinder48 typed above, but, wait, I believe President Obama asked for that and it was met with harsh disapproval. I guess its the messenger and not message, go figure.....

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