Many motorists decide against BP boycott

  • Follow Metro

Tanya Kennedy has answered more questions than she did before April 20, but not much else has changed.

Particus Blackshear, of St. Petersburg, Fla., pumps gas at the BP station at Wheeler Road and Interstate Parkway, where a cashier says business has been steady despite the oil spill.   Corey Perrine/Staff
Corey Perrine/Staff
Particus Blackshear, of St. Petersburg, Fla., pumps gas at the BP station at Wheeler Road and Interstate Parkway, where a cashier says business has been steady despite the oil spill.

"They have some comments. They ask, 'When are we going to fix the oil spill?' " said the BP gas station cashier. "We don't have any less business, though. I think it's some good gas if they're still coming back."

Her store, located at Wheeler Road and Interstate Parkway, has continued to see steady business despite the national and international backlash BP PLC has received for the worst oil spill in U.S. history. BP operated the Deepwater Horizon oil rig that exploded on April 20, which resulted in the death of 11 people and undetermined marine and plant life, and has leaked more than 100 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. President Obama has scolded the company for its role in the spill, and an investigation on what went wrong is under way.

The oil spill's environmental impact is not lost on BP customers. Ramsey Tercero, of Augusta, said he thinks of the devastation in the gulf each time he fuels up at BP. He has been a longtime customer because of the quality of the gas, he said.

"In the back of my mind, I think, 'What am I doing to support the death of these poor animals?' " he said. "If the investigation shows that they were arrogant and didn't care, I might boycott them."

Particus Blackshear, of St. Petersburg, Fla., always fills his gas tank with BP fuel, and he does not plan to change. He was visiting Augusta on Tuesday, and fueled his girlfriend's car at the Wheeler Road BP station.

"It's a tragic situation, but I think time heals," he said. "I am not going to boycott. Ten years from now, we're not going to be talking about this."

Plenty of talking is going on via social media Web sites Twitter and Facebook. By Tuesday evening, BoycottBP, a Twitter page, had more than 3,500 followers, and more than 1,000 tweets encouraging users not to give their business to the company's gas stations. More than 8,900 Facebook users have expressed dismay with the company by connecting to the "I Hate BP" page on the social networking site as of Tuesday evening.

The social media backlash and continued coverage of the oil spill could have a local impact, said John Butler, the president of Marco Petroleum, which owns six BP gas stations in the Augusta area. Shortly after the spill, gas sales spiked in the area at the gas stations, but sales have since leveled off, Butler said.

"I've heard of companies wanting to boycott stations, but if someone were to do that here, it would hurt our local economy," he said. "It would make it tough for the people of Augusta."

Butler said he hopes customers see that BP executives are working to correct mistakes made by the company. Local customers have remained loyal in spite of the incident, he said.

"They believe it's the best product in the world," Butler said. "We're just hoping that what happened at that end of the pipeline doesn't hurt us."

Social media

Twitter and Facebook have given consumers an avenue for expressing anger about the BP oil spill that did not exist during the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Consumers have created accounts on both Web sites to post links to stories on the incident and display vitriol about the company's response to the it, BP chief executive Tony Hayward and the impact on the environment. More than 8,900 Facebook users "like" the "I Hate BP" page, which is a way for users to express their interest in a page topic. Facebook users have made hundreds of comments on the page since its creation. Twitter allows its users to follow certain Web pages that interest them. The BoycottBP account on Twitter has more than 3,500 followers, and more than 1,000 tweets on the topic.

Comments (83) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
gijoe7898
0
Points
gijoe7898 06/23/10 - 04:09 am
0
0
Great. More job killing

Great. More job killing ideas from the left. Boycot BP. Damn the consequences such as hurting local small business owners and employees who are, for the most part, lower than middle class. Damn the many states and municipalities whose pension funds for leftist unions may be invested in BP. Damn the millions of citizens whose mutual funds may be invested in BP. And damn the president for strong arming and seizing private proerty ($20 billion) without due process of law. I guess this damns the Constitution.

Just My Opinion
7499
Points
Just My Opinion 06/23/10 - 04:32 am
0
0
Well, I for one do not buy

Well, I for one do not buy gas at any BP stations! Uh..but that's only because I can get it cheaper at the Kroger or Wal-Mart gas stations. Yeah, I can see how this would only hurt the station owners who have a license to sell BP gas. However, one would think that BP would've lowered the cost of their gas somewhat, in order to help stifle a knee-jerk reaction from customers.

pointstoponder
3220
Points
pointstoponder 06/23/10 - 06:28 am
0
0
Boycotting BP is a

Boycotting BP is a shortsighted and emotional response to a problem. The vast majority of the stores not owned by the corporation, but by local businesspersons. They are the one that suffer. BP needs to be in business in order to pay for the clean-up. If they fail, we the people get stuck with the entire bill.

veggie-d
0
Points
veggie-d 06/23/10 - 10:05 am
0
0
i WAS a LOYAL BP customer

i WAS a LOYAL BP customer before 4/20/10...but now...

BOYCOTT ON!

small local business owners have NO guarantee to remain in business, especially when they are backed by criminals, to sy it will hurt the "local economy" is NOT true...i buy gas wherever i happen to be...NOT always in the CSRA and whenevr and wherever i buy it...my money is STILL going to SOMEONE in THAT locality. the money is still there...just not in BPs pocket.

this spill is a crime against nature and BP does not deserve any "sympathy money". they have plenty of our money already. why not let BP reach into it's DEEP gold lined pockets and pay the small business owners for it's lack of consideration/respect for them and their livelihood?!

why should the american consumer (who has already been screwed by BPs FAILURE to follow safety precautions) be expected to bail out the "small business" owner who then funnels some great portion of their fuel profits right on to the ones responsible for the worst environmental crime/disaster in the history of mankind?!

we're already gonna be the ones who pay for the cleanup anyway...screw'em all!

where's the concern for the small business owners/big business owners/states who were DEVASTATED by this GREED driven disaster? why is everyone concerned about the criminals family more than the victims families?? true american sheeple herds at work!

TrukinRanger
1804
Points
TrukinRanger 06/23/10 - 07:14 am
0
0
BOYCOTT BP!!!!
Unpublished

BOYCOTT BP!!!!

Little Lamb
56881
Points
Little Lamb 06/23/10 - 07:37 am
0
0
Ever since those

Ever since those congressional hearings in which the senators shamefully dressed down BP's CEO, I have gone out of my way to buy BP gas. The spill is bad, but it is not as bad as Congress.

walrus4ever
398
Points
walrus4ever 06/23/10 - 07:43 am
0
0
There are many BP branded

There are many BP branded stations in the Mobile AL area and I saw no lack of customers while I was there last Saturday. The gas all comes from the same pipeline that serves Ga.

justthefacts
35009
Points
justthefacts 06/23/10 - 08:13 am
0
0
Filled up this morning. BP.

Filled up this morning. BP.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 06/23/10 - 08:20 am
0
0
Did BP choose to have their

Did BP choose to have their oil line break? Did BP choose to drill 5,000feet down (where developed technology doesn't work very well)? Did BP insist on not fixing the leak as fast as they can? Did BP refuse to help enterprises affected by this disaster?

Now, why would I choose to boycott BP?

dani
13
Points
dani 06/23/10 - 08:23 am
0
0
I drive a Ford and I always

I drive a Ford and I always use BP because my car likes it better. It raises Cain when I put the other stuff in. No boycott for me.

jb1234
0
Points
jb1234 06/23/10 - 08:27 am
0
0
I filled up at BP yesterday,

I filled up at BP yesterday, it's not the gas station owner's fault that this is happening, why punish them. By the way, I wouldn't recommend Kroger gas to anyone, I filled up with it once and noticed a huge decrease in the performance of my car, I guess it's cheaper for a reason.

grinder48
2320
Points
grinder48 06/23/10 - 08:29 am
0
0
Just interesting ... while
Unpublished

Just interesting ... while driving from Charleston to Columbia this past Saturday on I-26, somewhere in between I pulled off for gas and there was a huge BP place right next to a huge Sonoco place. Both same size, large enough to accomodate tractor trailers as well as cars, both clean, etc. The Sonoco place was packed with cars and trucks getting gas, the BP place was open but practically deserted. Can't say I looked at prices to compare, just filled up with Sunoco and headed on but thought it interesting. I'm not sure who owns Sunoco or others but I tyically wouldn't buy BP because I know it's foreign owned.

grinder48
2320
Points
grinder48 06/23/10 - 08:37 am
0
0
" ... said John Butler, the
Unpublished

" ... said John Butler, the president of Marco Petroleum 'if someone were to (boycott) here, it would hurt our local economy." No it wouldn't, people still have to have gas, they just go across the street and buy it. That you think readers are so ignorant as to not know that is insulting.

unbiased
0
Points
unbiased 06/23/10 - 08:43 am
0
0
Maybe I'm thinking about this

Maybe I'm thinking about this the wrong way, but a boycott seems counter-productive. I think the last thing the world needs is for BP to go bankrupt and not complete the clean-up or pay back those that are suffering a loss of income.

veggie-d
0
Points
veggie-d 06/23/10 - 08:57 am
0
0
johnston cliff- by hiring and

johnston cliff- by hiring and working with others who were not ensuring that proper safety devices/measures/protocol were in place to EASILY prevent the leak...YES BP DID choose to create this disaster!...all to increase productivity and profit at the expense of others...i'd push my car uphill in the rain before i'd buy BP.

for those who continue to say "BP will need money to pay for the clean-up, so let's keep buying their products."...think about what you are saying...

OIL MUST BE LIKE "CRACK" to you folks...why not buy some crack from a dealer who has been busted for their crimes?...they need a lil money to pay their fines too...

why should WE pay for BPs crimes??? directly or indirectly???...they have enough money to cover it and if not...they can sink to the bottom of the filthy ocean they created!

grinder48
2320
Points
grinder48 06/23/10 - 09:00 am
0
0
The stupid / frustrating
Unpublished

The stupid / frustrating thing about all this is this ... think about it. They say the only real solution is a relief well. It'll take about 8 - 12 weeks to drill that well. I recently heard some highly qualified scientist / geologist say some countries (I think I remember him having said Canada) will not permit start up of a main well before a relief well is installed and operational. That makes a lot of sense to me. So apparently US regulators don't impose this requirement, probably because they're in bed with the oil companies. Had that requirement been implemented in this case, leak could have been stopped right after it started ...

Dudeness
1546
Points
Dudeness 06/23/10 - 09:35 am
0
0
I never went to BP before the

I never went to BP before the spill. Their gas is always the most expensive and I remember them skyrocketing far beyond any other store's prices during Hurricane Katrina, wayover $5/gallon.

burninater
11687
Points
burninater 06/23/10 - 09:39 am
0
0
Grinder, the Canadian law

Grinder, the Canadian law isn't quite that stringent, and only applies to wells drilled where year-round activity isn't possible due to seasonal sea ice:

"The Canadian policy only requires companies seeking to drill in Arctic waters to have a viable plan for drilling a relief well, if one is needed, before the water freezes and ends the drilling season. The policy, which has been in place since the 1970s, is designed to prevent a ruptured well from gushing oil throughout the winter months before a relief well can be drilled when the ice thaws.

Less than a month before the Deepwater Horizon explosion, BP sought to rescind the requirement for a well it is planning to drill in the Beaufort Sea."

http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/06/proposal_to_ma...

veggie-d
0
Points
veggie-d 06/23/10 - 10:06 am
0
0
dudeness- good point.

dudeness- good point.

Chillen
17
Points
Chillen 06/23/10 - 10:19 am
0
0
Boycotting BP is totally

Boycotting BP is totally ridiculous. About 95% of BP service stations are privately owned. And, contrary to what "some" believe, they are not "backed" by criminals.

They are backed by a human being who decided to start a business. They went to a bank and took out a loan. They put up some of their own money to open up a filling station. They employ other human beings who go to work every day and contribute to our society.

Yes, the oil spill is terrible, but is it your neighbor who owns the filling station's fault?

While on vacation a few weeks ago we stopped at a BP station. They had employees out there pumping gas for customers, just like the old days. Quite creative.

CoastalDawg
126
Points
CoastalDawg 06/23/10 - 10:28 am
0
0
IF we boycott every single

IF we boycott every single company that has some type of disaster we soon will be buying absolutely nothing; post eruption information has indicated that the company that actually operated the oil rig made some serious mistakes in cost cutting moves - on the other hand what about the government entity that has the responsibility to oversee such things; what about the government's not responding to what had already been predetermined as a method should such a disaster occur, like burning the oil as it reached the surface? We have a terrible disaster due to apparent lack of attention to details but if we want to assess blame go back to those so called environmentalists who have forced off shore drilling into such deep waters that response to such a disaster is almost impossible. The blame game is a famous one and President Barak Hussein Obama's posturing up and making threats, then pressuring BP to put up $20 billion hasn't done a thing to stop the leak. Apparently he believes that if he speaks his will be done. Do NOT misread nor misinterpret what I'm about to write here, but throughout history God has used natural disasters to bring attention to Himself; we've seen a number of unusual and unprecedented happenings over the past few years yet we do nothing to bring ourselves back to practicing our national motto. Instead we play the blame game, point our fingers, and sanctimoniously sit back and wait for the next event. The thing to do now is plug the leak, learn valuable lessons from it, including NOT making companies drill a mile or two deep into the ocean when oil reserves are located in shallow waters and in lands that we're unwilling to use for drilling. Boycotting BP is like throwing your baby out with the bath water because he peed in it. I don't buy BP simply because it is the most expensive gasoline around; by the way, when gasoline is brought into the port on the coast, it is all the same - it becomes BP or whatever other brand it becomes when additives are put into it that make it a given brand. The statement about Kroger gasoline giving less performance is bogus unless there is an additive in another brand that boosts performance. I used to get best performance from Union 76 until Circle K or someone decided not to offer it any more but again, I'd credit that to additives.

justthefacts
35009
Points
justthefacts 06/23/10 - 10:32 am
0
0
According an article in the

According an article in the WSJ, the mount of revenue derived from gas stations is so small they don't even measure it. They make their money from the millions of products that are made from petroleum. Plastics for example. In the end, the boycott will only hurt your neighbor.

KSL
187048
Points
KSL 06/23/10 - 10:39 am
0
0
Grinder, BP is 39+% American

Grinder, BP is 39+% American owned. Boycotting BP reminds me of the NAACP's failed attempt to boycott SC. The SC coast is populated heavily with black people. Those working in the tourism industry would have heavily been affected if the boycott had not backfired on the NAACP.

jwsaxon
0
Points
jwsaxon 06/23/10 - 10:42 am
0
0
BP dropped the ball here, no

BP dropped the ball here, no argument. But how about some partial blame to the "oil greed" most Americans show with what they drive forcing companies to take chances like this to fill our demands. We still consume more oil then any other nation on earth at 21 MILLION BARRELS EVERY DAY. About 3 TIMES more than the next nation, China, 4 TIMES as much as Japan, and 7 TIMES as much as Russia. Face it, we fight wars and ruin our ecology mainly so we can drive large, inefficient vehicles.

KSL
187048
Points
KSL 06/23/10 - 10:44 am
0
0
Boycotting is just emotional

Boycotting is just emotional "I feel good because I'm doing something." It's very superficial and does not take into consideration all ramifications of the act.

Yes, let's hurt our fellow Americans who own and work at BP stations. That will really get back at BP management.

KingJames
12
Points
KingJames 06/23/10 - 11:48 am
0
0
Boycotting BP would hurt more

Boycotting BP would hurt more than just the privately owned gas stations. A lot of people could become unemployed. The gas station's employees, the employees of vendors who's products are sold inside the stations, the sanitation workers who empty the dumpsters at the BP stations, the folks who read utility meters, the telephone service provider, etc., all have the potential to lose their jobs or have their hours significantly cut because of a boycott. If they all lose their jobs, where are thy going to go for more work? A few of the gas station employees may find jobs with competing gas stations, but the majority will have to collect unemployment. A boycott is not the solution for punishing BP. I think the loss of oil, the costs associated with trying to stop the leak, and the enormous bill for the cleanup are already costing BP. Why should local people who had nothing to do with the disaster also lose out just to make people who can't do anything about the problem feel better?

veggie-d
0
Points
veggie-d 06/23/10 - 12:34 pm
0
0
ksl- don't know what you're

ksl- don't know what you're thinking or where you get that idea, but...south carolina suffered tremendous losses when they decided to fly that flag. they lost revenue MANY tax funded state programs and they continue to lose because of it.

the prupose of a boycott is NOT to run a company completely out of business. it is to let them know THE CONSUMER has a voice in their behavior/decisions/actions/profits...if they collapse from it, that just means the consumer has shown no mercy at all for their actions.

something big business ESPECIALLY OIL overlooks daily. it's the most DIRECT way to send a message to BP that the consumer expects more from them.

if you DON'T think "boycotts" work...just look at south africa...worked very well there and that's an entire country.

local people have ALREADY been impacted by the disaster...it's OUR gulf...OUR water...OUR wildlife...OUR ecosystem...

how much money are you folks sending to the folks in the gulf region who are closing their businesses EVERY day? are they NOT important?...or are these "they desrve a break" viewpoints just failing to look at the BIGGER picture.

if this oil was spilled into clarks hill (the real name of the reservoir) i'm sure all the BP sympathizers would be singing a TOTALLY different tune!

KSL
187048
Points
KSL 06/23/10 - 12:38 pm
0
0
Local people have been

Local people have been impacted. You and Obama are advocating more impacts on them. Get real. I know he can't.

gaspringwater
3
Points
gaspringwater 06/23/10 - 01:12 pm
0
0
It's not my habit to shop

It's not my habit to shop with BP I'd deliberately not shop with them since the spill in the Gulf. It appears BP has the worse workplace safety in the business. OSHA statistics show BP has 760 "willful, egregious" safety violations. Sunoco and ConocoPhilips each had 8, Citgo had 2, and Exxon had 1.

http://news.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474978304076

Back to Top
loading...
Top headlines

Prayer rally held outside Planned Parenthood

With the U.S. Senate scheduled to vote Monday on a bill to strip Planned Parenthood of taxpayer funding, more than 100 residents gathered Sunday for a prayer rally in front of the organization's ...
Search Augusta jobs