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Tips From Former Smokers campaign persuades many to quit

Monday, Sept. 9, 2013 4:55 PM
Last updated Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013 3:01 PM
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Watching an ad of former smoker Terrie Hall speaking with an artificial voice box prompted Lisha Hancock’s 5-year-old son to turn and ask her whether she would sound like that someday.

“Thanks to the campaign, I can look my son in the eyes and say that Mommy doesn’t smoke any more,” Hancock said as she broke in sobs. She was among 100,000 smokers who quit long term after viewing a video featuring Hall and others as part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Tips From Former Smokers campaign, the agency announced Monday.

According to research being published in The Lancet, the campaign prompted 1.6 million smokers to try to quit, at least 200,000 did quit and at least 100,000 of those will quit permanently, CDC Director Thomas Frieden said.

“That’s more than twice what our ambitious hope was of 50,000 sustained quits,” he said.

Hancock, of Elizabethtown, Ky., had smoked for 17 years and had tried to quit before but gave it up for good in February after seeing the ads with Hall, who had her larynx removed because of throat cancer.

“That scared me,” Hancock said. “I could see myself in her shoes had I continued to smoke.”

For her part, Hall said she was gratified by the response.

“When the Tips From Former Smokers campaign first started, I said if we can get just one person to quit smoking, or just one person to never start, that would be a success,” Hall said. “I never imagined it would reach so many people and change so many lives. It has been the most rewarding experience of my life.

“Lisha’s story makes me proud to be a part of this campaign. She is an example of what I tell everyone: the best way to quit is to keep trying.”

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Darby
29209
Points
Darby 09/09/13 - 07:52 pm
2
1
I'm just glad they quit.

Still, I wonder why some folks need outside help to do what they should be able to do for themselves and their families.

Not saying they don't need help, just wondering why that is the case.

InChristLove
22485
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InChristLove 09/10/13 - 05:39 am
3
0
Darby, because it is a very

Darby, because it is a very powerful addiction and quitting isn't the hard part it's the mental game weeks after that causes some to return to smoking.

Thank you Lord for helping me quit 15 months ago!

rmwhitley
5547
Points
rmwhitley 09/10/13 - 08:43 am
0
0
I was
Unpublished

fortunate enough to quit a 4 pack-a-day habit almost 24 years ago and luckily my wife quit a 2 1/2 pack-a-day habit almost 6 years ago. As the saying goes "if we can do it , anyone can".

mike1sc
217
Points
mike1sc 09/10/13 - 09:23 am
2
0
A Significant Addiction

Darby, quitting smoking for some people is quite easy but for the majority it is very difficult. We are no longer in the fifties with a doctor in an advertisement saying how healthy smoking Camels are. Facts are facts and the facts show smoking is very damaging to the smoker and to the people around the smoker. Facts show how addictive the nicotine is in cigarettes really is. Go to any Respiratory floor at any hospital and you will find 8 out of every 10 patients on that floor are smokers or ex-smokers. Lung cancer and throat cancer can and usually do ravage the body of the smoker. Terri Hall shown in the CDC commercial is an exception to the rule....most folks like Terri are already dead, she is the exception.

Unlike Augusta, most cities have already enacted smoking prohibitions, not out of the goodness of their hearts, but instead because people have brought litigation against cities for not protecting them, and Augusta will enact new laws as well, if not now, then they will after they lose a chunk of the budget in lawsuits.

Quitting smoking is harder for some than others. Nonetheless, smoking is very damaging, and that is no longer an opinion, its a fact.

Personally, I didn't find it that difficult to quit smoking after my ENT informed me I had throat cancer in 2008. And then later that year, when the radiation treatments didn't work, I had laryngectomy surgery so now, like Terri Hall in the CDC commercial, I breathe out of a hole in my throat. It is very trendy looking.

It is just another example of the significant addiction concerning the nicotine in cigarettes and other smoking products.

Darby
29209
Points
Darby 09/10/13 - 11:22 am
4
1
ICL - Thanks for your input. I guess I'm just

jaded. I tried booze and tobacco in high school. Never liked either and so other than one beer in Vietnam (There was no coke available.) I've managed to avoid both entirely. Other than an occasional glass of wine at weddings, that is.

My dad did both and was a confirmed alcoholic for much of his life. For some reason, that I'll never know, he quit (both addictions) cold turkey when I was about thirty..

I guess our experiences, his and mine, have influenced my ideas on addiction.

Anyway, thanks..

And you too, mike1sc, nice to know with what you've gone through, you've managed to maintain a sense of humor.

RogueKnight
221
Points
RogueKnight 09/10/13 - 12:41 pm
2
0
Proud reformed smoker here...

I started smoking at age 11, had a spontaneous pneumothroax (collapsed lung for no apparent reason) 3 weeks before I turned 19, had to have a thoracotomy (surgery to repair the hole in my lung,) had a two month recovery period, quit smoking for a year and a half and started back up at 21. By the time I was 23, I had chronic bronchitis. I put the smokes down for good in March of 1984 and haven't looked back. I wish I had never started. Even though I am healthy now, I don't feel like I have the lung capacity I should have, and wonder if it's because I smoked during my formative years. With all the information out there about how bad tobacco is for your health, I don't understand why people still choose to smoke. I understand addiction, but you can choose to not light up. You just have to set your resolve to not smoke. Since I quit smoking, food tastes better, my sense of smell is keen and my house doesn't stink or have that yellow dinge to the walls. I did put on some weight within the year I quit, but I call it a fair trade. Good luck to those who are considering quitting. It'll be the best decision that you can make for your health.

InChristLove
22485
Points
InChristLove 09/10/13 - 02:08 pm
2
0
Why in the world would anyone

Why in the world would anyone give Darby a thumbs down. There are some really disturbed people out there especially to find fault with Darby's netural comments on this article. Geeze Louise!

mike1sc
217
Points
mike1sc 09/19/13 - 08:13 am
0
0
Terri Hall

Terri Hall, who was discussed in this article, died this week due to complications during surgery. She was 53. From smoking....period.

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