Georgia, South Carolina list flu status as sporadic so far

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South Carolina has its first lab-confirmed case of flu this flu season, and Georgia has already had a couple of people hospitalized because of flu, the state health departments said.  The latest FluView released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show the two states are among 24 states reporting sporadic cases of flu, the lowest level of activity, just above no activity.

 In this photograph taken by AP Images for the American Lung Association in Colorado, Olympic Gold Medalist and spokesperson for the Faces of Influenza campaign, Kristi Yamaguchi, got her annual influenza vaccination at the American Lung Association in Colorado's flu clinic in Greenwood Village, Colo, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2010. Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older.   AP
AP
In this photograph taken by AP Images for the American Lung Association in Colorado, Olympic Gold Medalist and spokesperson for the Faces of Influenza campaign, Kristi Yamaguchi, got her annual influenza vaccination at the American Lung Association in Colorado's flu clinic in Greenwood Village, Colo, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2010. Influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older.

Georgia reported two hospitalizations, both in persons over age 50, and no deaths for the week of Oct. 10-16, the latest report, spokeswoman Ravae Graham said.

The South Carolina Depart­ment of Health and Environ­mental Control’s Bureau of Laboratories confirmed it has a case of influenza A H3-type strain from a sample taken from a child in Richland County.  The state has to send it to the lab at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine whether it is the H3N2 strain expected to circulate this year that is included in the vaccine, DHEC spokesman Jim Beasley said.

For the week ending Oct. 16, CDC has 24 states at sporadic activity status and 26 that reported no activity. Overall, only 3.6 percent of samples tested so far nationally were positive for flu, according to FluView.

Influenza experts had wondered whether the pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus that predominated last flu season would “crowd out” other flu viruses, as has happened after past pandemics. However, evidence from the flu season in the Southern Hemisphere, in addition to a few cases in the U.S. over the summer, showed the H3N2 virus was continuing to survive.

That is significant, health officials have said, because H3N2 seasons usually see higher levels of severe outcomes, such as hospitalization and death.

Of the very small number of samples tested and antigenically typed by CDC so far, the influenza A viruses were approximately split between H1N1 and H3N2. Both were included in this year’s vaccine.

“It just reinforces why it is we encourage folks to get vaccinated,” Beasley said.

“The vaccine right now is matching up very well,” Beasley said. “And it is still by far the best way to prevent the spread of the flu.”

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soldout
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soldout 10/22/10 - 09:22 am
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A recent study came out in

A recent study came out in the October 2008 issue of the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine saying the vaccination against the flu appeared to have no impact on flu-related hospitalizations or doctor visits during two recent flu seasons for young children. The researchers concluded that "significant influenza vaccine effectiveness could not be demonstrated for any season, age or setting".

Also a Group Health study found that vaccination does not protect elderly people against developing pneumonia (the primary cause of death resulting as a complication of the flu).

There has been no decrease in deaths from influenza or pneumonia among the elderly with the increase of vaccinations from 15% in 1980 to 65% now.

Little Lamb
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Little Lamb 10/22/10 - 09:27 am
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Facts are stubborn things.

Facts are stubborn things.

ruudvonbaron
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ruudvonbaron 10/22/10 - 01:55 pm
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I'd like to give Kristi a

I'd like to give Kristi a shot.

justthefacts
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justthefacts 10/22/10 - 02:01 pm
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Amen brother.

Amen brother.

corgimom
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corgimom 10/22/10 - 08:18 pm
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"There has been no decrease

"There has been no decrease in deaths from influenza or pneumonia among the elderly with the increase of vaccinations from 15% in 1980 to 65% now."

Considering that the population of our country was 226 million in 1980 and is now 305 million, with a huge increase in the elderly population, to say that there has been no decrease in deaths PROVES THE POINT that the vaccinations work.

corgimom
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corgimom 10/22/10 - 08:31 pm
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"A recent study came out in

"A recent study came out in the October 2008 issue of the Archives of Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine "

I read the results from that study. And it says this:

"Conclusion In 2 seasons with suboptimal antigenic match between vaccines and circulating strains, we could not demonstrate VE in preventing influenza-related inpatient/ED or outpatient visits in children younger than 5 years. Further study is needed during years with good vaccine match. "

What that means is that if you vaccinate children with a particular strain of flu virus, and then a different flu virus occurs in the population, the influenza shot will not provide protection and it will not reduce the number of doctor visits and hospitalization cases.

That CONCLUSION says something far different than what you are saying, doesn't it? Maybe taking things out of context isn't a good idea?

The study had nothing to do with whether or not influenza shots are effective, because obviously, if they are effective, why would you need to go to a doctor or ER for influenza?

It also says this: "In bivariate analyses, {influenza} cases had lower vaccination rates than subcohorts."

Meaning that people that were seen and/or hospitalized for influenza had LOWER vaccination rates, not highter.

Let's see, no shots, higher doctor visits/hospitalization rates. Yes, that makes perfect sense to me. How about you, soldout?

http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/162/10/943

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