Union sues Haley over Boeing plant remarks

COLUMBIA --- South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley is facing her first big lawsuit after saying the state would try to keep unions out of the Boeing Inc. plant in North Charleston.

The lawsuit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Charleston by the International Association of Machinists and AFL-CIO asked for a court order telling Haley and her director of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation to butt out and remain neutral in matters concerning union activities.

"There's no secret I don't like the unions," Haley said when asked about the litigation. "We are a right-to-work state. I will do everything I can to defend the fact we are a right-to-work state. We are pro-business by nature. I want us to continue to be pro-business. If they don't like what I said, I'm sorry, that's how I feel."

The lawsuit came after remarks Haley made last month as she nominated Catherine Templeton to run the state's labor agency. She said Templeton's union-fighting background would be helpful in state fights against the labor groups, particularly at Boeing.

"We're going to fight the unions and I needed a partner to help me do it. She's the right person to help me do it," Haley said at the time.

For her part, Templeton said: "In my experience I have found there is not one company that operates more efficiently when you put another layer of bureaucracy in. ... We will do everything we can to work with Boeing and make sure that their work force is taken care of, that they run efficiently and that we don't add anything unnecessarily."

The lawsuit said their actions, "taken under the color of state law, intimidate and coerce workers so that they are compelled to refrain from joining or supporting labor organizations."

Machinists union spokesman Frank Larkin told The Associated Press the lawsuit is an attempt to make sure workers' constitutionally protected rights aren't harmed by South Carolina's governor. Larkin hadn't seen another governor be so plainspoken.

"This is practically unprecedented for a state to be so clear and so overt," Larkin said.

If "the machinists are offended that the governor doesn't think unions are a good thing in South Carolina, they're just going to have to get used to it," Haley spokesman Rob Godfrey said.

Meanwhile, the National Labor Relations Board has threatened a federal lawsuit against South Carolina, Arizona, South Dakota and Utah over constitutional amendments guaranteeing secret-ballot union elections. Unions want to also be able to organize workers through signature drives.

Templeton was confirmed by the state Senate last week. But during her confirmation hearing, state Sen. Robert Ford asked her whether she had orders to crack down on labor unions. The Democrat represents the Charleston district where the Boeing plant is being built.

"But you don't have no mandate from nobody that we're not going to let no labor union exist at Boeing?" Ford asked.

"No, sir. Of course not. We don't have the authority to do that," Templeton said.

Ford said Thursday he took that as assurance that Haley was just playing to manufacturing and business groups and not overstepping her authority.

South Carolina's anti-union reputation was key to the 2009 decision by Chicago-based Boeing to expand its assembly operation here.

"There's no secret I don't like the unions," Gov. Nikki Haley responded.

Insurance chief

Gov. Nikki Haley on Thursday picked David Black, 53, of Greenville, who was the former chief executive officer of a U.S. subsidiary of the Royal Bank of Canada, to lead South Carolina's insurance agency, saying insurance is key to economic development.

-- Associated Press

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WW1949
19
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WW1949 01/22/11 - 11:55 am
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If I am on a job where a

If I am on a job where a union is trying to form, the way I vote is none of their business. Open voting is just a way to intimidate the workers. I remember doing a job for Lilly Cup company at least 30 years ago and was marched on by the union because I was non union a was awarded the contract. They said I was unfair. Unfair to who, my employees got paid and the job was done in a workman like manner. Go Gov. Haley and tell it like it is.

maninthepi
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maninthepi 01/22/11 - 12:09 pm
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back in the fifties the

back in the fifties the unions were good. now they out of
control and sending lots of jobs overseas. i don't blame companies
for leaving. the government is also to blame for it

dwb619
93534
Points
dwb619 01/22/11 - 03:35 pm
0
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What part did the unions play

What part did the unions play in textiles leaving?

usapatriot
0
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usapatriot 01/22/11 - 09:52 pm
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dwb, union or not, its cost

dwb, union or not, its cost analysis. If textiles can be made outside the US and shipped here for less than the cost of doing it here, it will be.

sounds cold, but consider. Company A moves its operation to Central America because it's cheaper. Company B decides "It's American to stay here and make American products."

Company A's product is $1. Company B's similar product is $2.

"B" pays workers a "living wage". It has state and Fed regulations to comply with that costs it lawyers and other additional personnel. It has the 2d or 3d highest corp income tax in the Western world to pay.

"A" pays $1/hr, has little regulation or tax.

"B" cannot continue making a product and losing money. It has to close, go bankrupt or move out of the country.

Consumers pay lip service to "Made in USA" while buying the less costly product.

"Corp" bigwigs get blamed for moving USA jobs overseas.

Anything here not clear?

dwb619
93534
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dwb619 01/23/11 - 04:03 am
0
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Still didn't answer the

Still didn't answer the question.
Also, one of the NAFTA provisions was to allow Mexican truckers complete access to the United States. That hasn't yet. Wonder why?
You answered me in your first paragraph. "union or not".
You can thank the Teamsters for putting pressure on the Department of Transportation to keep the Mexican rigs out of the USA.

usapatriot
0
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usapatriot 01/23/11 - 05:31 am
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whoa boy, our in my sights

whoa boy, our in my sights now. since I retired from the Army, I've been driving a truck.

The USA is by treaty (NAFTA) required to allow Mexican trucks into the USA. You want that?

Canadians can come in. They abide by the US DOT Hours of Service rules. Their truck meet inspection requirements. We can track their drivers and companies saftiy records.

US DOT has inspected Mexican companies. They have certified a few to come in. Like Canadian trucks, the rule is 1 load in the USA, one load back out. No running around our country picking up other loads.

USA companies like Swift invested in Mexican companies, providing new equipment to pass inspections. What the plan was, Mexican drivers get less than half a US driver's pay.

Swift & others could ship auot parts and produce across the border with poorly paid Mexican drivers rather than a transfer of loads at the border.

So, we get poorly paid, unknown spanish speaking drivers driving our roads. Want that around your family on the interstate?

And for you "jobs over seas" bleeding hearts, this is just what that is. These large trucking companies could bring in these cheap, unknown drivers to deliver goods at less than half what they poorly pay us USA drivers.

You've got to understand how regulated our industry is. I've got to work 60-70 hours a week to make $20/hr @ a 40 hour work week. $800 a week for what I do isn't great nor lacking. You'll never know how many breaks I give you in traffic. Every truck driver like that? No, but you'll never know, you're too busy going fast, eating or talking on your cell phone.

You're too busy wanting to get in front of me to turn or get off at the next exit. You'd be surprised how much we look out for Mr & Mrs 4 wheeler.

So dwb, if you want Mexican truckers in the USA, go figure. You're an expert, you don't even want USA truckers on your highway, do you?

And it's not just the teamsters. They are worried more about their wages than anything else. Add in OOIDA and every red blooded American truck driver to the list of those who want to keep Mexican trucks out.

Now, for those of you who want to play the race card, please feel free to lay out your ideas so I can educate you on this.

usapatriot
0
Points
usapatriot 01/23/11 - 05:34 am
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and dwb, obviously you choose

and dwb, obviously you choose to ignore my scenario about USA vs foreign production.

cat got your tongue? YOU COULDN"T REFUTE IT, COULD YOU?

usapatriot
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usapatriot 01/23/11 - 05:35 am
0
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common liberal tactic.

common liberal tactic. ignore sense and start some other diversion.

problem with that is, dwb, folks are wise to it.

dwb619
93534
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dwb619 01/23/11 - 10:40 pm
0
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Boy, you really jumped out of

Boy, you really jumped out of the boat on that one. My point was that the Teamsters and others held the line by not allowing this country to be OVERRUN with sub-standard, non-English speaking, unsafe trucking. Thereby saving many small American operators and their American employees jobs.
You may need to read my comment again.
As for foreign truckers, neither do I want them or ANY undocumented worker in this country.
I have no idea how you came to the conclusion that I have a grudge against truckers. I have an aunt and uncle who have been independent operators 30 years.
As this is a union bashing thread, I was pointing out what the teamsters did to protect AMERICAN truckers, union and open shop.
Finally, the cat has never had my tongue, but Chantix greatly alters your sleep pattern.

dwb619
93534
Points
dwb619 01/23/11 - 01:30 pm
0
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Also, as far as foreign made

Also, as far as foreign made products, I have to buy my jeans over the net to get AMERICAN MADE.
For years I only bought Made in USA products. Then came NAFTA, now my country of origin seems to be ABC, Anybody But China.
Perot said that large sucking sound you will hear is jobs leaving America.
Don't throw the term liberal too much. I am a big fan of Lou Dobbs, one of the first to argue against NAFTA.

DEADEYEDICK
0
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DEADEYEDICK 01/25/11 - 08:23 am
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Labor Unions are a blight on

Labor Unions are a blight on America today they were good in the early years but they caused most big companys to move overseas because of the cost.Look at GM Labor Unions caused most of its troubles.The Labor Union of today has out grown its purpose.

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