Sylvia Cooper

City Ink columnist and correspondent for The Augusta Chronicle.

Forecast does not look good for Fred Russell

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We’ve been shook up by an earthquake and blown away by hurricane news. Politically speaking, we can expect more of the same Monday when Augusta commission members shake things up and rattle the rafters at City Hall with strong gusts of hot air.

Commissioners Alvin Mason and Bill Lockett are proposing across-the-board raises for all employees who didn’t get them under City Administrator Fred Russell’s reorganization plan.

Cha-ching!

Mason also wants a status report from the city’s consultant on sales-tax projects, Heery International, while Lockett wants a status report on all SPLOST projects, I through 6, which covers the past 21 years of work.

Bring dinner and breakfast too.

Mason also wants to discuss pay raises, reorganization, re-classification and receive a report from Russell on the methodology used to determine the percentage of increases. And Lockett wants to “review and discuss the authority utilized to make retroactive pay increases to 44 Augusta-Richmond County employees and explain what action will be taken to eliminate the pay disparity created among Senior Executive Service, (SES) Group Employees; provide written documentation to support each pay increase and a written legal opinion to address the legality of making retroactive pay increases.”

Whew!

Commissioner Corey Johnson, trying to make up for not voting to fire Russell last week, wants to suspend his authority to give raises. And that’s not everything they have on committee agendas to give Russell hell about. They’ll have to wait awhile for some of it though because he’s not scheduled to come back from vacation until Tuesday. Lockett said he didn’t know when he placed some of the items on the agenda.

So the forecast for Russell is for continued heat and humility, accompanied by rumbling and grumbling, designed for humbling.

A PARSON’S TALE: The Augusta Baptist Ministers Conference sponsored a town hall meeting Tuesday at Antioch Baptist Church, moderated by Barbara Gordon, the publisher of The Metro Courier and a plaintiff in the ministers’ lawsuit against the city over restructuring.

The Rev. Melvin Ivey, the pastor of Greater St. John Baptist Church, also a plaintiff, gave an “Update on Lawsuit, Depositions, Hearing Date and The Real Purpose Behind Restructuring The Government.”

“I just want to bring you up to speed as to where we stand with our lawsuit,” he said. “First of all, let me say it this way, is that the city of Augusta was surprised that we had the nerve to question them. Say it again. The city of Augusta was surprised that we had the nerve to question them.

“When we questioned their authority with moving forward with the restructuring of the city government without having eight votes, they even attacked the ministers. They told us we need to stay in our place. You know how it is. They say, ‘Boy, get back in your place.’

“Well, I stopped by tonight to tell you I not only don’t have a place, but they’re not going to tell me where to go. They even had the nerve to say, ‘Preachers need to stay in the pulpit – stay out of government.’ Well, the Bible that I read says that the government would be on his shoulders. Whose shoulders? Going to be on the shoulders of Christ.”

SILVER’S UP TO ABOUT $40 AN OUNCE: Ivey then said he expects the lawsuit to go to court next month.

“We are taking them to court because the law is on our side,” he said. “They know that they’re wrong. They even went back and tried to change some language. They even bought one of our commissioners. Ya’ll know what I’m talking about. The one that sold out. I’m talking about the one the Lord said, ‘Who’s the Judas?’ Now we know who the Judas is. Judas is named Corey Johnson.”

He then took Johnson to task for what he said was a switcheroo with Commissioner Matt Aitken.

“He and Corey did what you call a switch, so Matt Aitken could get some street cred. So he could say, ‘I voted against Fred Russell.’ ”

“Fred Russell didn’t give those raises by himself. I guarantee you those six white commissioners and the mayor knew exactly what he was doing. They weren’t surprised.”

WHITE FLIGHT EXPLAINED: The real purpose for restructuring is that Augusta is becoming predominantly black, he said.

“They’re sending everybody to Grovetown. They’re sending everybody to Martinez. They’re sending everybody to Evans. When you get ready to buy a house, first thing they tell you is, ‘Move to Martinez.’ They say, ‘They’ve got better schools in Martinez.’ They tell you they’ve got better stores in Martinez.”

JUST TRYING TO GET OUT OF A CRACK: “They tell you the crime rate is better in Martinez,” Ivey continued. “The crime rate is not better in Martinez. The crime rate in Martinez is the same as it is here in Augusta-Richmond County. People are selling dope. People are breaking into your house. People are stealing. People are breaking into your house in Columbia County the same as they are in Augusta-Richmond County. You know why? There are no jobs. That’s why they’re breaking into your homes.”

Ivey then said the reason so many people are walking in neighborhoods is that they were moved out of Gilbert Manor but not provided any transportation.

“That’s why you see people walking in your backyard, and you get mad, thinking they’re trying to break into your house,” he said. “They’re just trying to make it to the store.”

RESTRUCTURING TO SPREAD POVERTY: The reason for restructuring is to outsource city departments, Ivey said.

“How many times have you called to check on a bill and somebody you can barely understand was talking to you on the other line? That’s called outsourcing. If they give you a job, it’s a part-time job. If they give you something, there’s no benefits. There’s no sick leave with those jobs. There’s no vacation with those jobs. They give you a job with a minimum wage, which means, pastors, we would never be self-sufficient because our people don’t have any money. We talk about tithing. Our people don’t even have a decent job. Our people are struggling to rub two nickels together to make a dime.”

And restructuring was never designed to save money, he said.

“It was designed so whoever comes into power – they know the way things are going we’re going to have seven or eight black commissioners and a black mayor. And the sad truth is you’re not going to have any power. So the whole purpose behind the reorganization is not to save money. It’s so people that look like you and I will not be able to move into west Augusta. It’s so people who look like you and I will never be able to afford a $250,000 home. Why? Because we’re still making minimum wages. They feel like minimum wage is too much.

“It’s time for a recall.

“It’s time for us to take a stand and let them know when you sell your vote, make sure you’ve got somewhere to go.”

THEY’RE PLANNING TO SUCCEED! “Here’s the bottom line. Your children and my children are going to have to reap what’s been sown. And until we stand up, until we do what’s right, they’re going to continue to take advantage of us. They’re going to do everything they can. And do you know what they’re going to do? They’re going to strip Augusta-Richmond County of all the benefits, and then they’re going to go to Martinez. They’re trying to make Martinez the place to live, so they can get all those federal dollars in Martinez, not Augusta-Richmond County.”

12TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: It’s awhile before qualifying, but Republican candidates are already making their intentions known. State Rep. Lee Anderson is already in the race, and former state Rep. Barry Fleming plans to run for Anderson’s seat. Augusta contractor R.W. “Rick” Allen is also committed, so those in the know say. And former Congressman Max Burns is testing the district waters for support.

Meanwhile, Don Grantham, 10th District member of the state Department of Transportation board, is now in the 12th District.

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Riverman1
83644
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Riverman1 08/27/11 - 09:19 pm
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Lawsuits and the wrath of God

Lawsuits and the wrath of God coming down from the sky. People in your backyard trying to get to the store. Wagon trains loaded up with families and Ward Bond as Wagon Master heading out to Martinez. I ask again sincerely, what potential administrator who doesn't have a serious felony warrant out for him in a nonreciprocal state with Georgia would take this absurd job?

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/27/11 - 09:39 pm
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About the new 12th

About the new 12th Congressional District, it appears Lee Anderson has emerged over Ben Harbin as the likely local candidate. The Columbia County News Times has never supported Anderson so I assume there's something to this Rick Allen candidacy and he may get the Columbia County paper backing is my guess.

Some say Max Burns is the favorite because of he is known throughout the district, but putting most of Columbia County in the same district with Richmond County is going to be a game changer in more ways than one. Besides assuring a Republican Congressman, it's going to make a Columbia County candidate hard to beat.

Columbia County is now recognized as a Republican power house the way they turn out votes for Republicans. Along with the many conservatives in Richmond County who would tend to vote for a "local" Columbia County fellow, it could mean Lee Anderson is the favorite.

Who would have thunk Lee Anderson would have a good shot at ending up in the U.S. Congress a few years ago? Heh. If the Beltway crowd thought Paul Broun was hilarious, they ain't heard nothing until Anderson gives his initial speech to Congress. Think of a white Moses Todd.

Taylor B
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Taylor B 08/27/11 - 09:36 pm
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Im pretty sure the guy I

Im pretty sure the guy I caught trying to pry the lock off my shed in my backyard wasnt going to the store.

Pu239
284
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Pu239 08/27/11 - 09:37 pm
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I'm a little confused by the
Unpublished

I'm a little confused by the rhetoric...“It was designed so whoever comes into power – they know the way things are going we’re going to have seven or eight black commissioners and a black mayor. And the sad truth is you’re not going to have any power." If you have a majority that should block vote...the block would control who the City Manager was, and therefore control that entity.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/27/11 - 09:42 pm
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TaylorB, the whole idea of

TaylorB, the whole idea of people wandering around in backyards has a zombie like feel to it. Can't you just visualize it?

cityman
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cityman 08/27/11 - 09:56 pm
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Ivey says that those federal
Unpublished

Ivey says that those federal dollars are going to Martinez...good. There is always a string attached to federal dollars. Federal dollars built federal housing projects and that is why crime is rampant in Richmond county!

Insider Information
4009
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Insider Information 08/27/11 - 09:57 pm
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If this Ivey guy is a

If this Ivey guy is a preacher, the only thing he is preaching is hate and racism. It's truly sad that people still think that way.

Interesting how he is so concerned about himself being "self-sufficient" from his congregation's tithes. Quite revealing.

Taylor B
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Taylor B 08/27/11 - 10:00 pm
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Just didnt want anyone to get

Just didnt want anyone to get hurt over a shed of old VW parts. I stood my ground, but didnt take the situation as far as it legally could have gone. I mean, I love my pristine set of German NOS floorpans, but no one needed to get hurt over such things. Jiggle my doorknob and the rules change. Im way fonder of the wife and kiddies.

Emerydan
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Emerydan 08/27/11 - 10:05 pm
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RiverM, I think you are

RiverM, I think you are mistaken a little in your analysis of Columbia County voters being this monolithic voting bloc will back whomever the "hometown good-ole-boy" candidate is. If that were always the case then Barry Fleming would be in Congress instead of Paul Broun. Columbia County voters are savvy and they tend to vote more on principles and issues rather than where a particular candidate lives or grew up. You have to realize that Columbia County has seen tremendous growth over the last 10 years and many of these new voters did not grow up in Columbia County and have no particular allegiance to the hometown good-ole-boys. Just look at the last gubernatorial primary, Columbia County GOP voters overwhelmingly backed Handel when nearly the entire CC GOP good-ole-boy establishment backed Deal. So, CC voters don't just fall in line with whomever the local establishment pushes on them. Anderson seems like a likable and honest man; the kind of plain spoken farmer that founding fathers like Jefferson probably envisioned serving in the House of Reps. But in 2011, is someone like Anderson ready for prime-time? Can he go up against the Harvard educated, well prepared Barrow? I mean just picture Anderson in a debate, or having to give a speech. Or just picture Anderson in Congress in Washington, DC. I just don't think many voters will be able to picture that, especially after seeing and hearing Anderson in a debate or forum. RW Allen? let's hope not. There's going to be a lot of questions asked about his motivations from for all of a sudden going from never being in politics to wanting to be the next congressman from the area. There will also be lots of questions about who's campaigns he gave money to and whether he benefitted by getting construction contracts for his company. You know he did get the TEE Center and library construction contracts among others (has RW Allen been mentioned as a possible construction company for Deke's ballpark?). Allen is strongly linked to the Augusta cabal, and I don't see that going over well with the average CC GOP voter. Ben Harbin? Fuhgetaboutit! As I said before, he has more baggage than an airport carousel the day before Thanksgiving. He's gone about as far as he can go. Max Burns I would say would be the front runner if he gets in.. barring some fantasy super candidate who has yet to be mentioned. Burns has respect and support in the rural counties, but he also has it in CC and Augusta. Max Burns could easily build a coalition throughout the district. He would play well all over. The CC boys who have been mentioned would have a hard time outside their own backyards, and there is serious doubt whether they even have strong support in their own backyard. Funny Sylvia mentions Grantham. That's a new one. But if Allen is serious about running then I don't see Grantham getting in.. you see their sort of in the same clique. I do not see them competing against each other. So from what I am seeing, as this candidate list is shaping up, I don't see any local guy as a front-runner. Bob Young has taken his name out of consideration. So far it looks like Burns is the guy.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/27/11 - 10:16 pm
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Emerydan, you make a good

Emerydan, you make a good point about the way Paul Broun handily whipped Jim Whitehead and Barry Fleming. But remember Whitehead almost beat Broun and the county had poor turnout thinking he was a sure thing. Recent elections the turnout has been much better.

Fleming had the support of the CCNT, too, but he was a much weaker candidate and Broun had already had time to show his outisider spunk inside the Beltway.

All I can say is that Broun was Tea Party before Tea Party was Tea Party.

Emerydan
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Emerydan 08/27/11 - 10:31 pm
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so my point being, that the

so my point being, that the local boys has to get overwhelming support from CC voters, and that takes an exceptional candidate. Fleming didn't even win Columbia County, so that goes to show how much influence the CCtimes has. CC has seen the most growth of any county in the metro area.. many of these new ppl were not born and raised in CC or even in the Augusta area.. They do vote conservative and vote GOP, but that doesn't mean they have some blind allegiance to whoever the local good-ole-boy establishment candidate is. In fact that may actually turn a good number of people off.. and I think it does. That's why I think Burns has an edge. he has good conservative credentials. He has won a congressional race before when the district actually heavily favored a dem. He can easily assemble a ground team in every county.. including Columbia County. So far I have not heard any local name mentioned that jumped out at me, and made me say, "now that guy is a winner. The race is all his." The local candidates emerging seem very weak. It's going to take atleast another cycle or two for CC or West Richmond county to prep some strong quality candidates. No one stands out. Now Bob Young could have probably pulled it off, but he has said he is not going to run.

Emerydan
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Emerydan 08/27/11 - 10:39 pm
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Maybe Whitehead could have a

Maybe Whitehead could have a chance, but he made some major blunders last time... has he learned from them? Does he even want to run? I haven't heard his name thrown out there.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/27/11 - 10:44 pm
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Whitehead lost by about 100

Whitehead lost by about 100 votes when everyone in Columbia County thought he was a shoo-in and stayed home. The county has gotten bigger and turns out now for Republicans. But I believe the big thing is that the Republicans in Richmond County will NOW be joining with Columbia County. That's a whole new deal.

Nahhhh, Whitehead has had it. He's pretty old which is another problem with Burns. Anyway, let's just hope a Republican can pull it off...which should happen.

Emerydan
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Emerydan 08/27/11 - 11:24 pm
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A strong CC candidate could

A strong CC candidate could definitely walk away with this thing, but so far, I see no strong CC or West Augusta candidate emerging.. not one who isn't saddled with too much political baggage

Vito45
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Vito45 08/27/11 - 10:55 pm
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RM:"Nahhhh, Whitehead has had

RM:"Nahhhh, Whitehead has had it. He's pretty old which is another problem with Burns. Anyway, let's just hope a Republican can pull it off...which should happen."

Let's hope a Republican in the mold of Christie can pull it off.

Crime Reports and Rewards TV
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Crime Reports and Rewards TV 08/27/11 - 11:18 pm
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They've been "cutting"

They've been "cutting" through our backyard here for years long before any projects were moved and took about $40,000. worth of stuff. Did they mention what store their buddies were headed to, we'd like to have our stuff back since they can't carry it all in their new BMW's?

Emerydan
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Emerydan 08/27/11 - 11:20 pm
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Well Vito, I see no

Well Vito, I see no Christie-esque republican from CC or west Augusta emerging.. and too many of you are assuming that west Augusta and CC will just be this one huge monolithic voting bloc for whatver the local establishment puts out there. I don't see it that way. Plus when you run as the "Local boy candidate" that turns off the rest of the district.. that happened with Whitehead.. even moreso with Fleming. If you play that strategy you better be counting on an overwhelming turnout from your home county with an overwhelming percentage voting for you, and as I said, I think more CC and west Augusta voters vote on principles and issues whther just blind allegiance to who ever the local establishment guy is. No doubt a certain percentage of local voters will back whoever the local establishment guy is, but those voters will not comprise enough of a majority to be some electoral tsunami to sweep the local good-ole-boy into office. And also I think the tea party will be a big factor here locally. So will a tea party candidate like McKinney be able to make inroads in Columbia County? Will tea party minded voters in CC want to back an establishment pork barrel type republican just because he is local? I don't think so. I mean what is the justification for simply voting for someone just because they are the "local good ole boy"? Usually its because they promise to bring the pork barrel spending back to their home county. Will tea party voters go along with that? Doesn't that sort of stand against all of their principles? I think you all are assuming that CC is just this robotic monolithic electorate.. if that was the case then your analysis would be right. But I don't buy that argument. I think CC voters are more savvy and principled then that, especially the newcomers.

Emerydan
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Emerydan 08/28/11 - 12:02 am
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I also think there has been

I also think there has been an overall voter backlash against pork barrel politicians. Voters are looking for principle, straight talk on how to cut the debt and government spending. The era of voting in the local good-ole-boy who will promise to bring home the bacon is over. Voters are rejecting that. Ideas and principle matter a lot more now than mere geography. So a local candidate better have some principles to run on other than people should vote for him simply because he is local and will bring back more loot. People are wising up to that and rejecting it. Now Burns is not the ideal candidate by any means, I'm just saying from what I have seen he appears to be the strongest (if he decides to run), but I'm hoping there are some other names that will emerge.

Taylor B
5
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Taylor B 08/28/11 - 12:41 am
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Pork barrell? Like the

Pork barrell? Like the deepening of the Savannah? Wait, that doesnt count... right?

Emerydan
10
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Emerydan 08/28/11 - 01:03 am
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Yes Taylor, that does count.

Yes Taylor, that does count. If the state of Georgia and Savannah wants to deepen the River port then they can dig into their own pockets, not those of taxpayers elsewhere in the nation.

Asitisinaug
3
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Asitisinaug 08/28/11 - 03:24 am
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IF this is really what a

IF this is really what a contingent of our black preachers are saying and preaching, then they are the most race bating individuals in our community who are part of the number one problem we have in Augusta.

thewiz0oz
9
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thewiz0oz 08/28/11 - 04:39 am
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GOVERNMENT More News |

GOVERNMENT More News | Augusta Comm. | Columbia Co. | Aiken Co. | Aiken | Editor
Augusta has had experience in replacing city administrators
By Susan McCord
Staff Writer
Saturday, Aug 27, 2011
Comments (1)

Follow Government
Taking heat for giving 44 city employees raises as the rest of staff endures freezes and cutbacks, City Administrator Fred Russell narrowly kept his job Aug. 16, with several Augusta Commission members citing the lack of a suitable backup as the only reason they didn’t vote to fire him.

Rainier Ehrhardt
Fred Russell: City administrator narrowly kept his job Aug. 16. Russell became city administrator in January 2005.
RELATED STORIES

Forecast does not look good for Fred Russell
Ministers group bashes Augusta government change
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Augusta administrator keeps job
Mason says Russell must go

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During Augusta’s short history as a consolidated government, however, the city has twice survived the unplanned departure of an administrator – although the second time, it was Russell who stepped forward during the budget process to ease the transition.
That is why some commission members who want to see Russell canned don’t buy the argument of his being irreplaceable.
“Just like he stepped in, other people could step in too,” Augusta Commissioner Bill Lockett said Thursday.
While Russell was on vacation last week, the commission had an opportunity to deal directly with his top assistants, Tameka Allen and Bill Shanahan. Some commission members have said they don’t know enough about the experience of either to be comfortable that they could handle the administrator’s job.
Shanahan “has only been in town for a month or two,” Brigham said, and “has not been in a city this size.” Before he was hired in March, Shanahan, a retired Air Force colonel, had served as the city manager of St. Marys, Ga., since 2004.
Allen, who would become the city’s first black female administrator, doesn’t appear to have much commission support for the job. She has dual roles as department head and deputy adminstrator and Allen was involved in the controversial government reorganization plan. She said she hadn’t considered whether she was up to the challenge, but didn’t know of any reason she couldn’t do it.
“I really haven’t given it any thought, because Mr. Russell is still here,” she said.
Shanahan said he has managed city government and worked with a three-person team to develop the city budget for St. Marys over the past seven years. The southeast Georgia city has a population of just under 20,000 and a total budget of $40 million. Augusta’s population is 200,000 and its total annual budget is close to $700 million.
Russell declined to resign over the salary raises, something he is authorized by the commission to do. He has stated he has confidence in both deputy administrators to carry on when he is away.
If Russell is fired, it wouldn’t be the first time the city has had to change administrators during the budget process.
WHEN RANDY OLIVER was hired to manage the newly consolidated city and county governments in October 1997, he brought in only one man – former deputy Richmond County administrator Walter Hornsby – to help him.
When Oliver’s résumé began to surface on short lists to head governments in other communities, city officials began to worry what to do if Oliver quit. In the end, even an offer of more money couldn’t retain him. In October 2000, Oliver took a position in Greenville, S.C., earning $135,000 – $35,000 more than he was making in Augusta.
Oliverleft a parting gift, however – a draft 2001 budget requiring several million dollars in cuts to be balanced.
Hornsby, who balked at commissioners’ doubts about his ability to serve on an interim basis, was tapped as the interim administrator.
In November, the commission hired a search firm to hasten the recruitment process for Oliver’s replacement. Among numerous applicants, the firm came forward with a finalist whom Mayor Bob Young recommended the commission hire – Detroit native George Kolb, who was then serving as deputy city manager and the director of public utilities in Richmond, Va.
Kolb, Augusta’s first black administrator, had previously served as assistant city manager or city manager in three Michigan cities. But recognizing, perhaps, the importance of having a backup, Kolb and some commissioners began pushing for the hiring of another deputy administrator, and Kolb already had one in mind – his former colleague, Deputy Richmond Police Chief Fred Russell.
Kolb, hired in April 2001, had a budget done by the end of the year that included a $79,000 salary for Russell to serve as the deputy administrator over public safety. Russell resigned his Richmond police job that year to run for sheriff of the city of Richmond, but lost and became one of what were then two deputy Augusta administrators in January 2002.
With some on the commission pushing to give Kolb more managerial authority, Kolb butted heads during his tenure with others as he asked for increased purchasing power and authority to hire and fire department heads.
“Our charter says we have an administrator, not a manager,” said former Commissioner Marion Williams. “He wanted to be a manager.”
Unlike Oliver, Kolb interviewed department head candidates himself and presented a recommendation to the commission. He complained of being micromanaged and in May 2004, four months after the retirement of Hornsby and at the start of the budgeting process, Kolb resigned to take a job as city manager of Wichita, Kan.
Russell’s salary was boosted to $105,000 when he took the reins as the interim city administrator, and commissioners heaped on praise when they voted in January 2005 to make his title permanent.
When Russell tapped Allen and Shanahan as deputy administrators, both were already city department heads. Allen, a city employee since 1992 and information technology director since 2004, continues to serve in both roles.
IT WAS AROUND the time Russell recommended Shanahan for the deputy administrator position over public safety earlier this year that commissioners’ disapproval of Russell’s government reorganization plan began to mount, particularly among commissioners who opposed the plan.
Allen, a major architect of the reorganization plan, was among the staffers given retroactive 15 percent raises that infuriated several commissioners including Alvin Mason and Lockett, who called for Russell’s termination. The boost brought Allen’s salary to $131,289, while Russell remains at $136,359, significantly less than his former bosses now earn.
Oliver is now the county administrator in Escambia County, Fla., while Kolb is assistant city manager in Surprise, Ariz.
While Mason and Lockett have for months called for Russell to provide documentation showing how the reorganization plan actually is saving the city money, the report Russell distributed earlier this week met with only tepid approval from the commissioners who didn’t vote to fire him.
Commissioner Jerry Brigham called for Russell to cut more and demonstrate more than the $2 million in savings the report showed, while Mayor Pro Tem Joe Bowles questioned the savings from positions that already were vacant. Mason has called for additional discussion at Monday’s meeting of the commission’s Administrative Services Committee.
AUGUSTA CITY ADMINISTRATORS

FREDERICK L. RUSSELL

Work: Augusta city administrator since 2005; deputy city administrator, 2002-2004; deputy police chief, Richmond, Va., 1995-2001; executive director, Virginia State Crime Commission, 1990-1995; police chief and emergency services coordinator, Bedford, Va., 1988-1990; Radford (Va.) University director of Safety and Security, 1983-1988
Current salary: $136,359.35

TAMEKA N. ALLEN

Work: Dual role as Augusta Information Technology director and deputy administrator since 2004; Augusta IT director since 2001; joined city government in 1992

Current salary: $131,289.34

WILLIAM P. SHANAHAN JR.

Work: Deputy administrator over public safety since March; city manager, St. Marys, Ga., 2004-2011; manager, Habersham County, Ga., 2002-2004; assistant administrator, Camden County, Ga., 2001-2002; assistant manager, Liberty County, Ga., 1991-2001; U.S. Air Force, 1976-1996
Current salary: $117,499.98

Comments

thewiz0ozSunday, Aug. 28 3:55 AM
edit
Let's see-Russell froze the salaries of the buddies of his fellow Commissioners while he gave raises to those of his staff whom he placed greater responsibility and charged to help him make the August Government more efficient and cost effective. Now the Commissioners whose buddies didn't get the raises want him fired. And many in the community want him fired for during his job. Only in Augusta.

thewiz0oz
9
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thewiz0oz 08/28/11 - 04:55 am
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Let's see-Russell froze the

Let's see-Russell froze the salaries of the buddies of his fellow Commissioners while he gave raises to those of his staff whom he placed greater responsibility and charged to help him make the Augusta Government more efficient and cost effective. Now the Commissioners whose buddies didn't get the raises want him fired. And many in the community want him fired for during his job. Only in Augusta.

thewiz0oz
9
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thewiz0oz 08/28/11 - 05:13 am
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The Rev Marvin Ivery doesn't

The Rev Marvin Ivery doesn't seem to understand entitlement government. When someone depends on the government for a living they will always live on the bottom of the barrell because they have to share their income with other freeloaders. The only ones who work for the government who do well are the elected politicians who rake off the top while promising the multitudes what they have to eventually have to share myth many others. Rev Marvis Ivery, if you want your people to do better insist they get an education & quit having children they can't afford and become responsible adults. Those living in the tempory low income Manor for those lifting themselves up turned the experience into a generational habitat. Don't look to the government for solutions-a look into the mirror- might surprise you.

Iwannakno
1533
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Iwannakno 08/28/11 - 07:40 am
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Ivey's comments show that
Unpublished

Ivey's comments show that some blacks can be just as racist as some whites. I find it odd that some blacks exalt Dr. King but forget his message. They want to be jusdged by the content of their character until the color of their skin gets them more power. Yep, sounds like a lot of white politicians. Until black and white come together for a better Augusta for all citizens and not just the ones that have the same skin color as them then Augusta will be stuck in quagmire of white vs. black and only the politicians will win.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 08/28/11 - 08:55 am
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By the way, Ben Harbin's cuz,

By the way, Ben Harbin's cuz, Barry Paschal, says today in the CCNT that Harbin hasn't decided yet whether he's going to run or not.

TCB22
632
Points
TCB22 08/28/11 - 09:46 am
0
0
What a bleak, sad,

What a bleak, sad, depressing, and distressing article. Is this rock bottom yet?

Vito45
-2
Points
Vito45 08/28/11 - 10:27 am
0
0
E.D.: "I also think there has

E.D.: "I also think there has been an overall voter backlash against pork barrel politicians."

I am one of those backlashing; thus my hope for a Christie like candidate. I don't care where his/her hometown is.

Insider Information
4009
Points
Insider Information 08/28/11 - 10:30 am
0
0
I'm not a native Augustan.

I'm not a native Augustan. Since coming here, I have wondered why everything (and I mean everything) involves race.

After reading Ivey's pathetic comments, now I know.

As someone described Augusta to me, some people here are still fighting the Civil war. It's no surprise that our schools are still under a deseg order and there is such mistrust among everyone.

Vito45
-2
Points
Vito45 08/28/11 - 10:35 am
0
0
Wonders: "..Ivey your people

Wonders: "..Ivey your people are doomed."

I would rather say "Ivey, your KIND are doomed"; for "your people" implies black folks in general (in my opinion). The good news is that as low income people work their way into middle class, they see what comes out of their check to support those who live off the benevolence of misguided government policy. They don't like Ivey's message any more than you and I do.

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