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Atlanta highways still dangerous

AP
Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014 9:20 AM
Last updated 7:04 PM
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ATLANTA — The snow and sleet had stopped falling and traffic was moving again around Atlanta following a crippling storm — but officials warned that ice-covered roads remained a threat for drivers this morning.

State officials were concerned with sub-freezing overnight lows potentially leading to layers of black ice coating roads that might appear to be safe.

Temperatures dipped into the teens overnight in the Atlanta area. Although it was supposed to be in the high 30s today, it was forecast to dip below freezing again before rising into the 50s on Friday.

Heeding the warnings, school districts and state and local governments stretching from northwest to coastal Georgia announced that offices and classrooms would remain closed today.

A storm that dropped just inches of snow Tuesday wreaked havoc across much of the South, closing highways, grounding flights and contributing to at least a dozen deaths from traffic accidents and a mobile home fire. Yet it was Atlanta, home to major corporations and the world’s busiest airport, that was Exhibit A for how a Southern city could be sent reeling by winter weather that, in the North, might be no more than an inconvenience.

The Georgia State Patrol responded to more than 1,460 crashes between Tuesday morning and Wednesday evening, including two fatal crashes, and reported more than 175 injuries.

At Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, more than 400 flights in and out were canceled by 6 a.m. Thursday, according to data from the flight tracking service FlightAware. Many of those flights were canceled before the day began.

Thousands of schoolchildren either slept on the buses that tried and failed to get them home, or on cots in school gymnasiums. All were back home by Wednesday evening, officials said.

State transportation crews spent much of Wednesday rescuing stranded drivers and moving disabled and abandoned vehicles that littered the interstates, medians and shoulders. Gov. Nathan Deal said emergency workers, police, and the National Guard would help drivers today to recover their cars and would provide them with fuel if necessary.

Crews planned to use four-wheel-drive vehicles to take motorists to vehicles they abandoned to reclaim them Thursday. State officials also said they were creating a database to help motorists locate vehicles that were towed to impound lots.

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jimmymac
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jimmymac 01/30/14 - 10:56 am
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SNOW & ICE

Unpublished

Snow isn't so bad to drive in if you know how to do it safely. Ice is a different matter all together. Todays four wheel drive vehicles give people the feeling they can drive faster than they should. You can go faster but you can't stop or maneuver so keep it slow and steady. Atlanta's mayor should have egg on his face for allowing the same mess to occur that happened in 2011. Didn't ATL's government learn anything? An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure!

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