Gov. Deal backs guns for school administrators

Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 10:50 AM
Last updated 11:46 PM
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ATLANTA — Gov. Nathan Deal on Wednesday predicted passage of a bill that would allow trained administrators to have guns in schools.

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal on Wednesday predicted passage of a bill that would allow trained administrators to have guns in schools.  FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal on Wednesday predicted passage of a bill that would allow trained administrators to have guns in schools.

During the Georgia Chamber of Commerce’s annual Eggs and Issues breakfast, Deal said much of any new gun-control measures were in the realm of federal government.

But the governor acknowledged he agreed with one state lawmaker’s idea in response to the December elementary school shooting in Connecticut that killed 26 children and adults: a bill to allow administrators who undergo the same weapons training as law-enforcement officers to carry guns in schools.

“That one does have some merit,” Deal said of a bill proposed by Rep. Paul Battles, R-Cartersville, that would authorize local school boards to arm principals if they choose. “If someone is going to be in an environment around children, they certainly need to be trained. I think it’s one that may receive favorable consideration by the General Assembly.”

Other bills would either impose greater restrictions on the owning of firearms or remove them entirely.

Terry Tittel, of Evans, said arming school administrators with weapons is not a good solution for preventing school violence.

“They’re already trying to do the best to teach our children. Now, you’re going to add something else for them to train on,” Tittel said. “Let’s develop a less encroaching solution, a different type of security for all the doors as you’re coming in.”

J.D. Drinnen, of Martinez, agrees with arming school administrators but said it should be voluntary, not mandatory.

“That’s a serious thing to contemplate especially if you’re surrounded by children,” Drinnen said.

Russell Creighton, of North Augusta, said training school administrators to carry guns is not necessary if police are present at schools.

“That’s just overkill,” Creighton said.

SENATOR WANTS MORE OFFICERS

COLUMBIA — The state Senate’s Democratic leader has proposed legislation funding a police officer in every public school in South Carolina.

Senate Minority Leader Nikki Setzler introduced a bill Wednesday requiring the Legislature to put enough money in the state budget to cover the officers’ pay.

Setzler says it’s meant to jumpstart debate. The West Columbia Democrat’s proposal comes a week after State Law Enforcement Division Chief Mark Keel told a Senate panel that every school needs an officer. Keel says that’s his top recommendation for making schools safer following the massacre last month at a Connecticut elementary school.

Most districts already pay for an assigned officer at their middle and high schools.

State funding for an officer in all schools would cost tens of millions of dollars.

– Associated Press

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Little Lamb
43813
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Little Lamb 01/16/13 - 11:57 am
4
0
Too Little

From the story:

But the governor acknowledged one idea in response to the Connecticut shooting that he agreed with, a bill to allow administrators who undergo the same weapons training as law-enforcement officers to carry guns in schools. Of the bills already introduced in Georgia’s legislature as of the third day of the current 40-day session, he predicted the only one to succeed is from Rep. Paul Battles, R-Cartersville, that would authorize local school boards to arm principals if they choose.

Why limit the authorization only to principals? If any salaried school employee obtains the requisite training and demonstrates proficiency, let them all help out. One principal will not be enough.

Also, many principals will choose not to participate.

GnipGnop
11451
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GnipGnop 01/16/13 - 12:08 pm
2
0
I think....

it should be like air marshalls. There might be one there could be 20. You would never know which ones are trained and armed. That's why these loons do this. There is virtually nobody in a school, hospital and other public places that would be able to stop a threatening menace to innocent people. How many police station shootings do you hear about? If you do hear about them how do they usually end and how fast?

thauch12
6138
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thauch12 01/16/13 - 01:49 pm
0
4
Reactionism at its finest...

It is really sad what Deal will do to pander up some votes. Arming administrators is not going to change anything. I would consider it a failure if even one child is killed at school because of gun violence. He would be better off fixing the real issue which is the travesty that we call mental healthcare in this state.

Little Lamb
43813
Points
Little Lamb 01/16/13 - 02:28 pm
2
1
Hardened Entrances

I posted this idea a couple of weeks ago and got no response. It came about because of what I observed when dropping into a local high school as a guest lecturer. It was my first time at the school and I noticed I could drive up and park anywhere my vehicle would fit.

Then when I entered the main entrance there was a big common area with students, teachers, staff, etc. bustling to and fro. There was no school employee to greet me, direct me to identify myself, to stop and explain my business. That seems wrong.

The only unlocked entrance to a school should be hardened. When a person enters, he should be in kind of like a submarine lock where he has to register, state his need to be there, and provide I.D. Then and only then should he be buzzed through the locked door into the school, preferably escorted by a faculty, staff, or trusted student to the appropriate place.

Why do schools fight this common-sense solution?

HenryWalker3rd
2393
Points
HenryWalker3rd 01/16/13 - 02:41 pm
2
2
Many Hats
Unpublished

Educators already wear many hats. Now, they would have to play security guard as well Will there be a pay increase as well?

Why not armed guards instead of armed administrators?

What makes you think that educators are not crazy too?

Where would you keep the gun?

What if the administrator is not working from the school, on a particular day?

What if the administrator doesn't want to? Would they be fired?

fedex227
10618
Points
fedex227 01/16/13 - 10:53 pm
2
2
I agree with LL

'Why limit the authorization only to principals? If any salaried school employee obtains the requisite training and demonstrates proficiency, let them all help out. One principal will not be enough.'

However, if you want to solve this problem, arm the children who are the ones directly in the line of fire. What the heck is wrong with allowing fully-trained, responsible, 12-year olds (if that is what we determine is the cutoff), with bringing weapons to school to protect their classmates? One teacher and a janitor or 16 armed preteens in a class of 32 - you do the math, which would be more effective?

oldredneckman96
4903
Points
oldredneckman96 01/17/13 - 11:22 pm
0
0
Guns
Unpublished

Just remember, the elitist want to tell you everything, including the fact they are the only one who knows what is best for you. Gun law proponents want to tell you who can have what type of weapon to defend yourself with. If you trust your teacher to teach your child, how can you not trust them to protect them? We do not have to require teachers to be armed, just protect the right to do so.

SuzyQ
24
Points
SuzyQ 01/18/13 - 12:20 pm
0
0
Teachers & Guns

I am one of the few who think this is a terrible idea- opens the flood gates on theft of those weapons and as well the weapon being used against the teacher. What I would suggest is two part-a guard gate similar to the ones in gated communities where the school cop would be the first line of defense. The second would be an exterior door located about 25 ft. from the main entrance that would be a metal detector (as the courthouse has); if the alarm sounds the main entrance door as well as all exterior doors would immediately close and lock and the police would be notified immediately via the alarm system. I noted that with all the school intrusions- the perp waits until all the children are in class, teachers are in class and the office administrators are in their offices(leaving the hallways clear for the perp) prior to attacking the school. I think most teachers would not feel comfortable with a firearm in their class. What about these "teachers' who prey on their students (affiars, molestations) no one ever knows who they are or what they have done-until it has been exposed by one of his/her victims. Guns in schools- seems that will open yet another can of litigation nightmares for the school district.

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