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Deal orders review of Common Core standards

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ATLANTA — Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal has ordered an extensive review of national education guidelines known as Common Core standards.

Gov. Nathan Deal also asked for a new social studies curriculum.  FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
FILE/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Gov. Nathan Deal also asked for a new social studies curriculum.

Deal also asked the State Board of Edu­cation to “un-adopt” part of the program that includes sample English test selections that some parents object to, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

Deal also asked the board to develop a new social studies curriculum that emphasizes, among other things, civic and fiscal responsibility. The governor also urged members to come up with a model reading list for school boards across Georgia.

The Atlanta newspaper reports that Deal’s order signals his declining support for Common Core amid criticism that the guidelines are a federal takeover of education policy. The voluntary set of reading and math standards has become a divisive issue in Georgia politics.

“There’s a lively debate going on in many states about whether Common Core raises or lowers the standards,” Deal spokesman Brian Robinson said. “This letter merely asks for the school board to review the Common Core standards and rate how they measure up to state standards used in the past.”

The national guidelines are hotly debated at school boards across Georgia and are at the center of budding political campaigns. The leaders of Georgia’s Republican Party in June voted unanimously to urge state leaders to withdraw from the program on grounds that it “obliterates Georgia’s constitutional autonomy.”

No state is forced to adhere to the Common Core standards. Georgia could get out of Common Core in a couple of ways: The state board could vote to pull Georgia out, or Deal could sign legislation pulling the state out of Common Core.

On Wednesday, the State Board of Edu­cation held committee meetings but did not formally discuss Deal’s letter. It is likely to be on the agenda when the board meets in September.

“I can assure you we’ll do what the governor has asked us to do,” board member Scott Johnson said.

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Bodhisattva
5647
Points
Bodhisattva 08/23/13 - 04:15 am
0
0
July 8, 2010 — The State

July 8, 2010 — The State Board of Education today adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English language arts and mathematics for grades K-12. These state-led academic standards were initiated by the National Governor’s Association (NGA), co-chaired by Governor Sonny Perdue, and the Council of Chief State School Officers CCSSO). The CCSS for grades K-12 were developed in collaboration with a variety of stakeholders including content experts, states, teachers, school administrators and parents.

“The State Board’s vote to adopt the Common Core State Standards is a huge step toward giving us a meaningful comparison of our students’ achievement with that of students in other states,” said State Board of Education Chair Wanda Barrs. “Our students will be competing for jobs with students from all over the world and we must be able to compare ourselves to the rest of the U.S. and other countries to ensure that we are providing students with the tools they need to be globally competitive.”

The CCSS is a state-led initiative — not a federal mandate. Georgia teachers and other experts in standards setting have been at the table since the process began. When the expert development groups that the CCSSO and NGA pulled together began writing the standards in mathematics and English language arts, they built off of the work of states that had already developed rigorous college- and career-ready standards. Georgia was one of these select states, and when reading the CCSS, it is clear that there are many elements of the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) throughout. Therefore, the adoption of the CCSS in Georgia will not be a drastic change for either teachers or students. Some of the standards are introduced at different grade levels, but teachers have, essentially, been implementing the CCSS while they?ve been teaching the GPS.

“Georgia has been ahead of the curve in the development of rigorous standards,” said State School Superintendent Brad Bryant. “The Common Core standards enhance the Georgia Performance Standards and ensure that all of our students will be taught a world-class curriculum that will prepare them for college or a career.”

seenitB4
81877
Points
seenitB4 08/23/13 - 08:15 am
1
0
Something isn't working

You can talk til you are blue in the face but something is NOT working in our school system......I think it has more to do with discipline than anything else.

class1
299
Points
class1 08/27/13 - 08:44 am
0
0
Discipline

Yes, fix the discipline and system will work! However, you need to start putting the blame on the parents . Stop blaming the teachers! However, no one wants to step up to the plate, and make that statement to the public. So in the meantime, the state will continue to manipulate the data to good like everything is going well in the education system.

class1
299
Points
class1 08/27/13 - 08:44 am
0
0
Discipline

Yes, fix the discipline and system will work! However, you need to start putting the blame on the parents . Stop blaming the teachers! However, no one wants to step up to the plate, and make that statement to the public. So in the meantime, the state will continue to manipulate the data to good like everything is going well in the education system.

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